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MDB #4: The Age of the Machines - Final milling and profiling

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Blog entry by PurpLev posted 1356 days ago 2229 reads 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: So many cubes - GULP! ....I mean GLUP..... um - GLUE UP Part 4 of MDB series no next part

Disclaimer: This blog follows my Magen David Board that is already finished and posted here

Once everything was glued up into a single slab, it was time to plane it flat and parallel. one of the strips I jointed happen (don’t ask me how…lol) to be jointed off square, throwing the last 4-5 strips in the glueup off flat (mostly flat). I was tired at this point, and just figured I’m not going to rejoint it, but will pay the price and plane it all down at the cost of having a thinner board – it didn’t seem like it was going to take off too much material, but more than what I had hoped for.

I took the board to the garage, and went at it with hand planes. Unlike planing cross grain, planing end grain is a serious task, the bites are hard, the setting needs to be such that the plane will take ultra thin shavings in order for it to be able to handle the shearing force, and the lumber is not very friendly to the blades – I think now that I’m done I’ll have to resharpen all plane blades just because of this one job.

I was able to decently plane most of the board down flat , but those last 4-5 strips were too low that I wanted to keep at it with this method.

The next day, I reconfigured my old drill press table that served me as a glueup guide, and was not setup as a planing base along with 2 jointed flat support boards that are slightly taller than my cutting board.

I shimmed the cutting board between the 2 ‘rails’ so that it won’t be moving about, and using my old workbench-planing-sled and a 1-1/4” mortising bit, I went at it taking ~1/32 passes until I was able to level out the board on one side, flipped it (and put a 1/8” masonite sheet under to lift it up a tad bit) and did the same thing to the other side to get a flat and parallel board – rough looking:

After that, I went back to hand planing it flush and smooth. still not an easy task, but at least the bulk of it was done. remember – bevel the edges slightly so that you don’t chip it as your planing through it.

Now that I had a flat board to work with, I trimmed it on the TS tot make it square on all the edges so that I can edge treat it with the router table.

I then (finally since setting it halfway up) was able to utilize my router table and the LS positioner to get:
  1. A nice consistent bevel around the edges (top and bottom)
  2. fingers handles on both sides – this was real nice since I setup stops on left and right of the fence, and was basically following along, while taking 1/8” passes to get the total of ~2.5” deep pockets in a matter of seconds – no guessing, no remeasuring – once the stops were set, they kept their location throughout the entire process. I’m really liking this fence.
  3. V shaped juice grooves. again – setting up the stops on both ends, and sneaking up on the final stops was easy with the precision of the Incra positioning method.

what I eventually got. was this:

A bit thinner than I had planned for, the geometry is a bit off from the original lines I had designed for it, but I think it came out great! I’m really liking this one, and the thickness actually looks more elegant than the original thicker design.

With a bit of mineral oil. this project was done and done, and can be seen here:

Click for details

After applying the oil, the board twisted corner to corner. at first I freaked out, but then it hit me that this might be the effect of the oil and once it is fully absorbed evently, the board will naturally balance itself out – which it has, and is back to flat.

So, the project is done, Lessons learnt, Experience gained, and I’m pretty happy with it all. All in all, even though there was a lot of fixing and dealing with the improperly milled lumber – it was a fun project to work on, and I already have a couple more in mind.

Thanks for reading,
Peace.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.



14 comments so far

View lew's profile

lew

9831 posts in 2257 days


#1 posted 1356 days ago

Great series, Sharon!

I picked up quite a few tricks from your experiences, thanks!

Lew

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8473 posts in 2150 days


#2 posted 1356 days ago

glad to hear that Lew – mission accomplished!

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Karson's profile

Karson

34797 posts in 2902 days


#3 posted 1356 days ago

Sharon:

A great completion to the board.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8473 posts in 2150 days


#4 posted 1356 days ago

Thanks Karson, as I was routing the details, and it started to shape up the accomplishment feeling kicked in. finally a finished project.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View dub560's profile

dub560

606 posts in 1415 days


#5 posted 1356 days ago

looks great pulplev

-- Life is enjoyable especially when you borrow from people

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6642 posts in 2481 days


#6 posted 1355 days ago

Hi Sharon;

Really very nice!

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2094 posts in 2229 days


#7 posted 1355 days ago

I enjoyed reading your about your progress. thanks for posting and showing what great results you achieved!

View Robb's profile

Robb

660 posts in 2435 days


#8 posted 1355 days ago

Great looking board!

I have those same earmuffs, btw, and love them.

-- Robb

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4617 posts in 2383 days


#9 posted 1355 days ago

Crimmineee. I forgot how many steps there are to make a board. I just read post 1 to this one, and I am exhausted. Good job, and a really nice looking board.

The grooving on the top and at the end really adds a professional touch.

Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8473 posts in 2150 days


#10 posted 1355 days ago

Thanks guys. glad you enjoyed. hope you enjoyed it at least as half as I did ;)

Steve – it’s amazing how many steps are taken to make a board of wood into a board of wood isn’t it?

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Jimi_C's profile

Jimi_C

506 posts in 1736 days


#11 posted 1353 days ago

Funny, after just posting on #3, I noticed you used maple and cherry – exactly what I’m planning on doing :) I’m staying away from the triangles though… this is my first butcher block and I’ll be happy if I just get the cubes right :D

Also, I plan on using the router setup to flatten mine too. I’m going to glue up long boards that are 7/8” x 1”, then cut them in 2” sections to turn them up for the end grain. I plan on doing the long glue-ups 4-6 at a time, so I can run them through my planer on edge to try and keep them consistent… we’ll see how that goes after the first batch though.

-- The difference between being defeated and admitting defeat is what makes all the difference in the world - Upton Sinclair, "The Jungle"

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8473 posts in 2150 days


#12 posted 1353 days ago

Sounds like a good idea Jimi_C. If you plane/thickness all your sub-blocks at the same time you can also ensure that they are all of the same thickness – although since you will be then flipping them on edge – it may not really matter that much. Good luck with it. looking forward to see the posts and pictures :)

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Jimi_C's profile

Jimi_C

506 posts in 1736 days


#13 posted 1349 days ago

I was going to use the router setup for the end grain part. I’m going to use the planer for getting a consistent thickness on the boards after they’re face-glued. I don’t want to deal with individual blocks like yours, since they’re such a pain to get even like that.

-- The difference between being defeated and admitting defeat is what makes all the difference in the world - Upton Sinclair, "The Jungle"

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8473 posts in 2150 days


#14 posted 1349 days ago

Jimi- the only reason I slowed things down is because I was drying to draw a picture with the triangles that is not consistent from one strip to the next. If I was doing a squared uniformed board – I’d just plane everything down with a planer, and not worry too much about it. it would have been much faster and less of a pain. go for it!

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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