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Making wooden dowel with a router #2: How it is done

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Blog entry by Pjonesy posted 12-05-2016 11:24 PM 1064 reads 3 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: How to make your own dowel Part 2 of Making wooden dowel with a router series no next part

A few people have asked for more information so here goes. Use a piece of scrap timber preferably hardwood about 100mm (4”) x 45mm wide (1 3/4) x 20mm thick (3/4”).
 photo IMG_7174_zpsisaccc12.jpg
For 1/8” dowel bore a 9/64” (1/8” is to tight) hole straight through the length approximately in the centre, then cut a notch 3/4” wide and 1” from the end. This is the gap for the straight cut router bit This notch only needs to go slightly past the back edge of the 9/64” hole.
Now bore a 11/32” straight down the centre of the 9/64” hole from the 1” end. This size hole may vary depending on the size of the timber you are turning into dowel. I found that I had a few off cuts of 1/4’ square timber, if you take a fine arras off each edge it will fit nice and snugly into the 11/32” hole. It is important that the timber fits snugly in this end otherwise it will jump around and the dowel wont turn out as it should.
 photo IMG_7178_zpsoi0h07pv.jpg
Now all that has to be done is to clamp the jig to the base and guide of an upturned router, push a piece of 1/8” dowel through the 9/64” hole to line up the cutter, then you are ready to run a test.
Put a piece of 1/4” square timber in your drill and do the chuck up fairly tight (this will centre timber in the chuck as drill chucks don’t like 4 sided items) start the drill to see if the timber is centred and running reasonably straight.
 photo IMG_7179_zpsncxcu4bq.jpg
If all is going to plan clamp you upturned router in a wood vice or other device and fire it up then fire up the drill on a fast speed, now you ready to push the timber through the jig and if you have set up everything properly you will see perfectly round dowel coming out the other end.
When the timber is in as far as it will go turn of the router before withdrawing the dowel otherwise you will destroy what you have just created.
 photo IMG_7180_zpsz19rasod.jpg
I find that if you are very careful you can turn the dowel around and run that last bit through the router so that the whole length is usable.
Give the dowel a light sand and there you have it.
 photo IMG_7172_zpsupffqwht.jpg Remember using routers upside down in a vice is dangerous and anyone doing this method does so at their own risk. Always think safety first and protect yourself.

-- Peter New Zealand



8 comments so far

View htl's profile

htl

3058 posts in 972 days


#1 posted 12-06-2016 12:09 AM

Nicely done and thanks.
Off the top of your head do you remember what bits you would use for any other size dowels?
And thank you, thank you very much!!!

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2515 posts in 1981 days


#2 posted 12-06-2016 12:23 AM

Thanks, this makes sense and is very usable.

Nice to see how we can help each other here at LJ.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

1273 posts in 634 days


#3 posted 12-06-2016 02:10 AM

Thaks Pjonesey. Simple and a very thorough description.

Give me a chance and I’ll over-engineer this to hell.

PS. Now all we need to do is metricate ALL you noncomformist Kiwis. Long live the Metric ruler...

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Pjonesy's profile

Pjonesy

206 posts in 639 days


#4 posted 12-06-2016 02:36 AM



Thaks Pjonesey. Simple and a very thorough description.

Give me a chance and I ll over-engineer this to hell.

PS. Now all we need to do is metricate ALL you noncomformist Kiwis. Long live the Metric ruler...

- LittleBlackDuck

Hey LBD I am with you but I am using an American plan, Gatto’s grader. I still have my Aussie passport as well, however I do find a lot of people over here still use the imperial system.
You will notice I converted some of it to metric but thought I better put the old imperial in for people who may follow the build when I get around to uploading the progress.

-- Peter New Zealand

View crowie's profile

crowie

1990 posts in 1764 days


#5 posted 12-06-2016 07:07 AM

A HUGE AUSSIE THANK YOU Peter from across the ditch….

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

View htl's profile

htl

3058 posts in 972 days


#6 posted 12-06-2016 11:07 AM

Google needs to make an automatic measurement translator. lol

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2515 posts in 1981 days


#7 posted 12-07-2016 08:00 AM

Thaks Pjonesey. Simple and a very thorough description.

Give me a chance and I ll over-engineer this to hell.

PS. Now all we need to do is metricate ALL you noncomformist Kiwis. Long live the Metric ruler...

- LittleBlackDuck

Hey LBD I am with you but I am using an American plan, Gatto s grader. I still have my Aussie passport as well, however I do find a lot of people over here still use the imperial system.
You will notice I converted some of it to metric but thought I better put the old imperial in for people who may follow the build when I get around to uploading the progress.

- Pjonesy

What is imperial?

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View crowie's profile

crowie

1990 posts in 1764 days


#8 posted 12-07-2016 08:35 AM


What is imperial?

- Dutchy

THANK YOU Dutchy…. I have now had my daily good belly laugh…..

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

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