LumberJocks

Stickley Spindle Dining Chairs #1: Beginning the cuts for the raw pieces

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Philfranklin posted 480 days ago 1547 reads 1 time favorited 24 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Stickley Spindle Dining Chairs series Part 2: Part 2 of Spindle chairs »

Having made a couple of prototypes from Robert Lang’s plans I embarked on the ambitious journey of building a complete set of 8 chairs; 6 side chairs and 2 arm chairs, along with the Stickley #599 Trestle Table. I thought it might be helpful for those who wanted to know about building this unique chair design.

The first image is of a raw “blanks” for the back legs. I oriented the quarter sawn face on the sides, and prefered veneering a quarter sawn face on the front and back to create the 4 sided quarter sawn leg.



24 comments so far

View Philfranklin's profile

Philfranklin

44 posts in 544 days


#1 posted 480 days ago


My first chore was to cut all the rough pieces to size.
Making the backs, curved pieces was a decision; steam bend, laminate around a form or cut from a solod block on the band saw? I chose the later. In this view you see where I cut the tenons first.

View Philfranklin's profile

Philfranklin

44 posts in 544 days


#2 posted 480 days ago

I traced a 36” radius template on each member following the tenon cut. I own a tenon jib which was essential for this whole project. More on that later.

View Philfranklin's profile

Philfranklin

44 posts in 544 days


#3 posted 480 days ago

Having bandsawn the set of 6 upper and lower back members, I was on my way!

View Philfranklin's profile

Philfranklin

44 posts in 544 days


#4 posted 480 days ago

Here they are… all 12. Ready for careful preparation.

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

10774 posts in 837 days


#5 posted 480 days ago

Gotta follow this. Chairs are one of my next jobs to tackle.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it. - It's not ability that we often lack, but the patience to use our ability

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3025 posts in 1312 days


#6 posted 479 days ago

This is a great blog. I have not seen rear chair legs laminated, so that will be interesting. I usually just cut my rear legs out of solid stock. Front legs are easier to laminate because they are straight without any angle.
Good luck, I’ll be watching this one for sure.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View ZED's profile

ZED

83 posts in 858 days


#7 posted 352 days ago

ok I’m interested, hooked, more pictures please ;-)

-- A good craftsman is able to make it work with the tools he has, I still need more tools

View Philfranklin's profile

Philfranklin

44 posts in 544 days


#8 posted 264 days ago

Cutting the compound angled through tenon members was the HARDEST part of this entire project. Glad I did mock-ups. I will admit I am doing this all “after the fact” in this blog but guys have been asking for images to assist in their own efforts.

View Philfranklin's profile

Philfranklin

44 posts in 544 days


#9 posted 264 days ago

This is the compound tenon cutter I purchased used from Craigslist. BOY did it answer my prayers.

In laying out all my pieces with mockups, I carefully indicated which way was UP/DOWN, LEFT/RIGHT. I personally suggest making shims and alternate V blocks for reversing the camber when doing the opposite side of the leg’s side stretchers.

View Philfranklin's profile

Philfranklin

44 posts in 544 days


#10 posted 264 days ago

This shows how I went about clearly indicating which members were which. The poplar mock-ups in the middle took a lot of trial and error to perfect before I cut on the oak. I wrote on all of the members which side faced the plate, which side had a shim. Bear in mind that the angle of the cut is only about 2.5 degrees. It matters however over a length of its length for the compound miter. It creates the 1/2” height variation between the mortise in the front and the rear leg.

View Philfranklin's profile

Philfranklin

44 posts in 544 days


#11 posted 264 days ago

The upper left/right side stretcher is also compound cut, but the angles are different for the rear leg as the stretchers hit the leg on the curve. It is nearly 0 degrees but trial and error is best to ensure the fit.

View Philfranklin's profile

Philfranklin

44 posts in 544 days


#12 posted 264 days ago

The spindles are a breeze. Cut LOTS of stock 1/2×1/2. Resist the temptation to use random pieces of scrap without checking at least their own preference of curving or bowing. I learned to use a board and maintain the orientation for all the strips. That way the give or deflection in the cutting of the stock into 1/2” pieces will be uniform across the whole and not have each spindle waving at you in defiance of their desire to lean this way or that.

Cut 1/2” mortise holes and FIT the spindles into each one. Make the orientation of the spindles. be sure to do all your surface sanding of the spindles while they are loose and not already mounted in the assembly.

View Philfranklin's profile

Philfranklin

44 posts in 544 days


#13 posted 264 days ago

As I said earlier in the blog, I am doing all this after-the-fact with available pics I have at my disposal in order to help my wood working buddies. The sequence may seem a bit out of context though.

I made all the parts in sections, at one time. Then assembled the chairs in pairs. It was just easier that way, and took up less space with only two chairs in process instead of 8.

This shows the matched sides with their stretchers, mortised and fitted, dry assembled at the moment.

View Philfranklin's profile

Philfranklin

44 posts in 544 days


#14 posted 264 days ago

As a side not, I cut all the mortises on the legs first. Then I cut the tenons to fit the holes made. Not the other way around. I DID learn you can glue wood back and refit if need be. Sometimes the mortise machine “magically” takes off more somehow :-)

View Philfranklin's profile

Philfranklin

44 posts in 544 days


#15 posted 264 days ago

In this image its easier to see that the upper stretcher hits the rear leg where it begins its angle back. Thus the caveat about finding the fit.

Also its clearer to see that the upper and lower stretcher, though parallel to each other, are ascending 1/2” from back to front. That’s about 2 degrees. When its time to bore your square holes for the spindles, MARK the low and high ends. Cut a wedge of 2 degrees) to cancel out the angle when on the mortise machine. Then the spindles will fit perfectly upright, going from bottom to top in holes which are oriented to be 88 degrees.

showing 1 through 15 of 24 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase