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Life as an Amateur Woodworker #75: Made a start on the Dining Room Suite

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Blog entry by PhilBello posted 04-05-2016 08:34 PM 703 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 74: A Cheat! Part 75 of Life as an Amateur Woodworker series Part 76: A Tip When Making Simple Sanding Blocks »

I think it will take almost as long to prepare this, as if I made it from scratch! On closer inspection, they used nails to supplement all the joints. Then just covered both the nails and the joints in filler, I guess to cover with their gloopy paint!

I started by sanding the table with 80 grit, to remove the filler and expose the nails and wood grain, then punched all the nails, and raked out the filler.

They have not only nailed the joints, but the top to the skirt as well, which is a shame.

Removing the filler was easier than expected, they hadn’t even worked it into the holes/joints, however on starting under the table, albeit out of sight, I want to make sure it is all to the same standard, I found they had not even been careful with their nails, and one supposedly holding the top, had missed the leg below.

I ended up cutting this off with my rotary tool, I thought about knocking it back out, but with my luck, and Murphy’s help, I would have split the top!

Once I had finished sanding the table, I used the sawdust mixed with glue, working it into all the joints and nail holes.

Once dry, it will then all need to be sanded again, and if needed, the DIY filler topped up, and sanded again.

I then moved on to a chair, where nails have been used yet again, this is going to be fun!

I had to give up before I had finished the first chair, as I was suffering spinal pain, but will be back to work in the morning.

-- If you want the rainbow, you got to put up with the rain - Steven Wright



7 comments so far

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

7705 posts in 2307 days


#1 posted 04-06-2016 01:58 AM

Phil,

If the joints are only secured with nails ( might have missed something) What about removing them and doweling?

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

7705 posts in 2307 days


#2 posted 04-06-2016 01:59 AM

Just read where you worried about splitting the wood.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View PhilBello's profile

PhilBello

390 posts in 1432 days


#3 posted 04-06-2016 01:13 PM

Tom, the joints I am pretty sure are M & T glued and then nailed! unfortunately the saw dust I mixed with glue had dried dark, so the nail holes are visible, hopefully once I stain them, they will look less so!

-- If you want the rainbow, you got to put up with the rain - Steven Wright

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3392 posts in 1669 days


#4 posted 04-10-2016 11:15 PM

Phil

Get a HSS drill about 10mm or there abouts, then check you have a a plug cutter of exactly the same size.
In an inconspicious spot of similar grain cut some plugs, and then carefully drill out the nail hole filler, then insert the plugs, paying close attention to matching the grain direction, and I think you will be happeir with the result.
Dont use a forstner or the likes as you will touch a nail heads somewhere along the way, sure as eggs.

-- Regards Robert

View PhilBello's profile

PhilBello

390 posts in 1432 days


#5 posted 04-10-2016 11:59 PM

Thanks Robert,

I know I would encounter the nail heads, because I punched them in, they are only 2-3mm below the surface, I certainly like your idea, and can see how it would do the job, the problem is there are so many, it would look like Swiss cheese on the underside. I might go back to the Shop and see if I can get a similar piece of oak to cut plugs from.

-- If you want the rainbow, you got to put up with the rain - Steven Wright

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3392 posts in 1669 days


#6 posted 04-16-2016 07:16 AM

Phil, me again

If the holes are only a few mm you may wish to try a hollow punch method and some thin oak Veneer
and punch out heaps of little circles from the veneer, some will possibly split in half on yoiu and you will lose them but it beats plugging away at them if there is so many.

You will need the following tools
1 A wad punch slightly larger than the nail hole
2 Some oak veneer
3 A transfer punch that will fit inside the wad punch
4 A hammer
5 A suitable work surface

Punch out heaps of veneer circles, now they are bound to bind in the Wad punch so with your transfer punch reversed hold the wad punch over the transfer punch and gently hammer them out by hitting the wad punch.
Once you have made enough caps next step is using the same wad punch position it over the nail holes and gently hammer away until the punchs face taper just enters the wood the thickness of the veneer or a little less, then using the punch gently chisel out the blind hole.
Apply glue and insert a round oak cap, sand to finish!

OK lets see if it will work in practice

Making the veneer caps,

sure enough there is some splitting

The veneer caps results

Sure enough some rejects

Getting the wad punch cleared

Out they come.

Fitting the caps

After using the wad punch as a chisel drop the cap in.

A bit fiddly, but may be of assistance to you beats having to make plugs and drill holes for them.
There is a slight difference in circumfrences but the glue made fill it OK otherwise sawdust in the glue.

Dont hit a nail making the recess or you will have to sharpen the wad punch as well.

-- Regards Robert

View PhilBello's profile

PhilBello

390 posts in 1432 days


#7 posted 04-16-2016 12:28 PM

Hi Robert, thanks for going to the trouble of demonstrating this, I have a couple of problems with it, the first being, ther sheer number of nail holes I have, ranging from pins to larger nails, I couldn’t see them when I bought the furniture because they had smeared filler over each head, but now they are shining at me like a mirror! the larger ones, I have punched below the surface, but I haven’t touched the pins yet, although I will have to, otherwise they will rust.

The second is, I have some oak veneer, from another project, but it is darker than the existing oak, so I will have the same visual problem as the method I am using now, using the oak sawdust mixed with glue.

I remain hopeful, because after a week, the dark spots where I have filled are lightening slightly, so will not be as noticeable once varnished with the oak colouring…I hope.

I started sanding again on Friday, and ket stubbing my injured finger, unfortunately I turned the air blue, so have stopped again, until I have some skin on my finger!

Thanks again, Phil

-- If you want the rainbow, you got to put up with the rain - Steven Wright

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