LumberJocks

Life as an Amateur Woodworker #28: Carport

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by PhilBello posted 10-14-2014 12:41 AM 1426 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 27: Pipe Clamps! Part 28 of Life as an Amateur Woodworker series Part 29: Tip of the Day!!! »

I recently decided that I would retire gracefully from motorcycling, I bought a new bike in March and have only done 500km due in part to the weather, and probably more importantly due to the horrendous standard of driving in Colombia, there isn’t a day when I am out in the car that I don’t pass at least two accidents involving motorcycles.

So the bike is being sold, and I have purchased a 1982 Suzuki SJ, which I am more than happy with, but it came with it’s own problems, the main one being how to keep it from becoming a mobile swimming pool, with all the storms we are having.

I made the decision that it was time for a carport on the parking area, big enough to take our two cars, however again I was restricted by finance, and that lead to an interesting design.

To limit the number of roofing panels needed, using corregated UPVC I needed to slope the roof in two directions simultaneously, firstly it had to slope front to back, to protect the vehicles from both rain and the sun, and then it had to slope from left to right, so I could put the corregated sheeting length-ways to allow the water to run off, and use less sheets than if fitted the conventional way.

The answer to this, was firstly to cut, the back or lower posts to 1.9m, and the front or higher posts to 2.3m, I then shortened one of each pair by 10cm. I then attached the roof beams (4cm x 12cm) to the posts (9.5cm x 9.5cm) with 3/8” threaded rod, at 4.5m, allowing a slight overhang on either side, which as you will see shortly had to be disguarded.

The overall depth of the carport is 4m, but to allow for an overhang front and back the posts are set at 3.4m, the width to allow for the two cars was calculated at 4.75m, with the posts being set at the previously stated 4.5m. I attached the posts to the parking area using metal post bases with 3/8” expanding bolts, which like in previous projects I had to have the bases fabricated, because they are not sold over here.

I then slotted the 4m rafters (4cm x 9.5cm) and placed them between the roof beams, fortunately I did not nail these on immediately, I usede my japanese saw and a chisel to cut the slots, the saw was like a knife going through butter in the mahogany, definitely one of my better purchases. I also fitted corner braces to the posts to make it more rigid, with it being freestanding.

I then headed off with the trailer to buy the roofing sheets, I was told that they were 70cm x 255cm so I bought twelve and headed home, where I decided to dry fit a few before fixing them in place, and this was when I found that the sheets were not as advertised, but were 70cm x 245cm, and this made a big difference, I needed to remedy this without having to buy another six sheets, and the only way was to get rid of the overhang on each side, which left the sheets with only a 10cm overlap in the middle, which is not ideal considering there is only a fall of 10cm over a 4.75m distance, but…

The roof fitted, all the timber which I had painted with waterproofer before construction, then had to be stained, which fortunately I completed before a tropical storm came along to test it, and the overlap seems to be OK, the water ran off as it should, and now the SJ is protected from the elements, and the only time I will need an umbrella is if I am out on the roads when the rain comes :)

-- If you want the rainbow, you got to put up with the rain - Steven Wright



4 comments so far

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

7706 posts in 2308 days


#1 posted 10-14-2014 01:04 AM

Phil,

Not laughing at your misery, laughing with you in your misery. LOL! It’s easy to visualize and plan but…Murphy usually shows up? I’m amazed when he does not and things go smoothly as planned.

Isn’t there a roof of sorts for the car?

I bought material for a 12 ft by 12 ft awning to extend from my shop. We now need a permit for any build. Use to be if it cost over a thousand dollars. Bought some 5/8ths 4×8 ft sheets which I am too woosie to lift up onto rafters. AndI don’t have enough to hire help even at minimum wage. Fortunately or unfortunately my walnut tree has gone for any light it can get and is now extending its canopy over the parking area.

The material is waiting under some plastic drop cloths.. Winter is coming, and I’m getting older and woosier.

Hey you got warmth and rain I get freezing 40 below Fahrenheit and snow. And no canopy for my vehicles yet.

Thanks for posting. Looks good!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View PhilBello's profile

PhilBello

390 posts in 1433 days


#2 posted 10-14-2014 01:34 AM

Hi Tom, I’ve got a soft top, I only bought the car two weeks ago, I have had the car serviced, now I have got to save up to have the soft top repaired, it is dryer than being on the bike, but not much ha! ha!

Yep you are right, it is certainly warmer here, I wouldn’t trade that, can’t stand the cold now!

Hopefully you will figure out how to get your sheeting up on the rafters, there is usually a way, I am surprised at having to have a permit, I thought you only needed them for permanent structures, but every country is different, what do I know. Here if you are out in the sticks and you want to build something, build it!!! as long as no one complains nothing is said.

-- If you want the rainbow, you got to put up with the rain - Steven Wright

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

7706 posts in 2308 days


#3 posted 10-14-2014 01:57 AM

Maybe you can sell the motorcycle and get some cool woodworking tools? LOL! Got to go feed my shop cats. They have been locked in the shop since babies due to a very controlling neighbor that has passed away. They have an enclosed kitty jail that they can go outside. Problem is they are fixed but continue to do what unfixed cats do. I find cat urine to be a great challenge. But they are my pride. You know like a pride of lions?

Have my window challenge mostly met. had to build a sacrificial fence for my saw. MDF sucks. Won’t use it again!

Then if nothing is under Murphy’s challenge I make my next step into chain saw milling and building some shop jigs, dust collection completion and making some prototype cabinets for the shop in preparation for some real woodowrking/furniture/art/ stuff.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View PhilBello's profile

PhilBello

390 posts in 1433 days


#4 posted 10-14-2014 12:37 PM

Nice thought Tom, but the motorcycle is being sold to replenish the funds taken for the SJ !!

I am surprised at your comment on MDF, I actually like using it, but here, for some reason, the price is ridiculous, so don’t get to use it much.

You take care with that chain saw milling, as for jigs, I love making them, I haven’t used half of those I have, but I know they are there when needed.

I have moved away from cabinets in a workshop, they take up so much space, I am moving towards the french Cleat system, which is easy to install and cheap, as a lot of it can be built from scrap.

Glad to hear you have nearly finished the window, and look forward to following your next escapade! :)

-- If you want the rainbow, you got to put up with the rain - Steven Wright

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com