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Weekend "Arts and Crafts" side table

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Blog entry by Blue Mountain Woods posted 05-17-2010 04:03 AM 1471 reads 2 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I have Arts and Crafts in quotes, because I woke up this morning and decided to get rid of some scrap. The result is that the only thing Arts and Crafts about this thing is some of the joints and profiles used. It’s meranti with purpleheart pins. Stickley’s laughing from his grave, but I’m having more fun than he is.
Still have to shoulder the tenons prior to final. Also, haven’t really decided whether or not to radius the apron. Suggestions welcome!





-- Pete ----- http://www.bluemountainwoods.com



16 comments so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115201 posts in 3037 days


#1 posted 05-17-2010 04:18 AM

Wow I love that Idea well done.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View mpmitche's profile

mpmitche

428 posts in 2436 days


#2 posted 05-17-2010 04:52 AM

It looks like it will be great. I love the square purpleheart pins, they really stand out.

-- Mike, Western New York

View Blue Mountain Woods's profile

Blue Mountain Woods

110 posts in 2394 days


#3 posted 05-17-2010 05:47 AM

Thanks, Jim and Mike. But really…...can you hear Gustav saying “What the heck’s with that diamond, Boy?” (It was an afterthought from Meg, who will have to live with it.)

-- Pete ----- http://www.bluemountainwoods.com

View sras's profile

sras

4391 posts in 2589 days


#4 posted 05-17-2010 06:29 AM

An excellent job of “getting rid of” scrap! This is going to look fantastic!

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1429 posts in 3019 days


#5 posted 05-17-2010 04:33 PM

Love the design and the execution. So it’s not in the Stickley catalog. Who cares? I wouldn’t round over the aprons. A nice hand sanding will ease the edges sufficiently for comfort. You could always do an inlay inside the diamond which could act as a “frame”.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View Blue Mountain Woods's profile

Blue Mountain Woods

110 posts in 2394 days


#6 posted 05-17-2010 07:18 PM

CaptainSkully ~ Thanks!
On the radius thing, I probably should have been more clear: I wasn’t meaning to radius the edge (as would be inferred from my wording). I meant putting a slight curve along the bottom edge like Stickley did on his Harvey Ellis designs.

TO ALL:
I’ve always taken the easy way out on finishing, so I’m needing some help here! Do any of you have experience with wax / shellac or wax / oil finishes? Tints? Tinting tung oil?
I need a bone, here, fellas!

-- Pete ----- http://www.bluemountainwoods.com

View HighRockWoodworking's profile

HighRockWoodworking

182 posts in 2440 days


#7 posted 05-17-2010 11:40 PM

Great job! Really good picture showing how you assembled the top, it looks great.

As for a finish, I believe simple is best. I would just use a rub on varnish, you don’t want to loose the contrast in the purpleheart pins, but that is just my opinion.

Look forward to seeing it finished!

Chris Adkins
http://highrockwoodworking.com

-- Chris Adkins, http://highrockwoodworking.com/

View Blue Mountain Woods's profile

Blue Mountain Woods

110 posts in 2394 days


#8 posted 05-17-2010 11:44 PM

Chris, are you cutting wax into that?

-- Pete ----- http://www.bluemountainwoods.com

View mpmitche's profile

mpmitche

428 posts in 2436 days


#9 posted 05-18-2010 12:29 AM

I have been using shellac on a project I am doing right now. On the white cedar I used the grain is tight and the shellac went on easy and left a nice finish (I am rubbing it on with my best impression of a french polish). The white oak is a different story. The porus grain has led me to spend a lot of time filling the grain (a time consuming process of rubbing the sealed project with pumice). I’m don’t know what the grain of meranti is like but I can tell you filling open grain the way I have been doing takes a lot of time. Other than that I really like the shellac. It goes on easy and because it dries so fast you can just keep building the finish without waiting around for the last layer to cure. I think the best part of it is that it can be fixed easily and I like the way it doesn’t give a plastic look like some poly does. As for color I used blonde shellac and it just makes the wood color look like it does when you wipe it with mineral spirits.

-- Mike, Western New York

View BarbS's profile

BarbS

2434 posts in 3546 days


#10 posted 05-18-2010 02:09 AM

Well, that is innovative! And seemless joinery on the top. Thanks for the pix. Great idea.

-- http://barbsid.blogspot.com/

View Blue Mountain Woods's profile

Blue Mountain Woods

110 posts in 2394 days


#11 posted 05-23-2010 06:27 PM

notottoman ~
Yup… there are some places where I swear by ‘em. One thing I ran into: because there’s an angle at the joint between the diamond and the rest of the top pieces, I had to plunge 25mm into the “straight” pieces and 15mm into the diamond (I used 40mm dominos) in order to achieve the rotational swing I needed for assembly.

-- Pete ----- http://www.bluemountainwoods.com

View HighRockWoodworking's profile

HighRockWoodworking

182 posts in 2440 days


#12 posted 05-28-2010 05:32 PM

No I am not a fan of wax….but that is just a personal preference.

-- Chris Adkins, http://highrockwoodworking.com/

View Blue Mountain Woods's profile

Blue Mountain Woods

110 posts in 2394 days


#13 posted 05-30-2010 10:40 PM

Hey, folks… back from vacation (sort of; we still have the three-day weekend. : )
I took yesterday to complete the side table. The apron is an Ellis rip-off, and the spindles are nearly so. But, it was lots of fun, and first cut to completion took about 11 total hours (not including tung oil finish, which feels like it takes about 3 years). For those interested in ripping off my rip-off, I used loose tenons in the spindle ends, and pinned the stretcher tenons from underneath with 3/8” dowel.




-- Pete ----- http://www.bluemountainwoods.com

View mpmitche's profile

mpmitche

428 posts in 2436 days


#14 posted 05-31-2010 04:49 AM

It came out beautiful. I really like the style and think you did an excellent job with it.

-- Mike, Western New York

View Blue Mountain Woods's profile

Blue Mountain Woods

110 posts in 2394 days


#15 posted 05-31-2010 08:13 AM

Thanks, Mike! The thing I like most about LJ is the extreme level of varied experience here: I’ve never built a thing that hasn’t been built built before (sometimes much better) and the exchange of information by people that reflects their awareness that they’re in the same place: If I build a thing, than so can you. If you cannot, than we will help you to.
I wasn’t an LJ member for a day, before I met people who were building amazing, absolutely beautiful things from their heads, with whatever tools they choose to swear by. Personally, I think that choices are in part cultural. Take Jim, for example; I can’t get with the beard thing (I’m from NYC and I think he might be a hick….lol…) but he has a billion years of real experience that’s evidenced by his work, and if NASA ever colonizes Mars, they’d be smart to start with real woodworkers, because we all speak a sophisticated language that only we speak, no matter where we’re from (and; we’re SCARY smart…... and, of course, WAY better-looking than any “astronaut”.)

Bottom line is this: Thank you, mpmitche for you kind words; I did what I did on the backs of 2,000 years of our predecessors. Let’s keep sharing all we have and putting the trade before ourselves.
I, for one, am very impressed by the membership of LumberJocks, and will have LOTS more questions because I have the affliction of endless learning. : )

-- Pete ----- http://www.bluemountainwoods.com

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