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Dovetail box in Mahogany and Poplar (in 4 parts) #2: roundover for box lid (2 of 4)

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Blog entry by Paul Sellers posted 1001 days ago 3137 reads 1 time favorited 23 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: four corners and planed in 10 minutes (1 of 4) Part 2 of Dovetail box in Mahogany and Poplar (in 4 parts) series Part 3: Finishing with Shellac »

Here is the second part of a short series. In this one I round the edges of the lid with a hand plane.

-- Paul Sellers, UK http://paulsellers.com/paul-sellers-blog



23 comments so far

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1751 days


#1 posted 1001 days ago

nearly the way I learned it in primeryschool :-) thanks

I noticed you lubricated the sole midway ~ what do you use
and the can with ? is what …. looked like a very fast and easy way of doing it

take care
Dennis

View Paul Sellers's profile

Paul Sellers

277 posts in 1206 days


#2 posted 1000 days ago

I use a rag neatly rolled up so that it sticks above a 4 ounce baked bean or tomato can by 12 mm. It must be as tight in the can as possible. I then charge it with 3-1 machine oil. I sue this on the sides of all of my saws and other metal tools too.

-- Paul Sellers, UK http://paulsellers.com/paul-sellers-blog

View Dan's profile

Dan

3543 posts in 1516 days


#3 posted 1000 days ago

How do you prevent the tear out when planing the ends? I heard you say something about tear out in the video but I couldn’t really make out what you said. Is it the angle in which you are using the plane that prevents the tear out?

Great video. Thanks for posting

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"

View Paul Sellers's profile

Paul Sellers

277 posts in 1206 days


#4 posted 1000 days ago

Yes. See the angle of presentation right at the beginning. This is a slicing action. The shallower the angle the less tearout. There is never any tearout using this method. As an apprentice we made all window sill returns this way. The window bottoms (boards) came with a bullnose but because all sill sizes differed, they had to be done by hand. Very fast, as fast as a router when you have skill. Sales reps tried to sell us routers back then but they were too slow and caused tearout too frequently. Hard to believe, eh! We also dis returns on stair nosings too. It works. I cut my teeth on this type ofwork.

-- Paul Sellers, UK http://paulsellers.com/paul-sellers-blog

View AttainableApex's profile

AttainableApex

338 posts in 1469 days


#5 posted 1000 days ago

why do you use 3in1 oil instead of wax. i think pretty much everyone uses wax

-- Ben L

View Paul Sellers's profile

Paul Sellers

277 posts in 1206 days


#6 posted 1000 days ago

Most craftsmen used oil.It’s fast and the system with the ragtin works only with oil. Wax is thicker and has it’s uses, but as I said, my tools never rust and I use the ragtin all the time because it sits on my bench. I simply drag the plane across the cloth and get on with life. Wax and all that is very slow by comparison. Imagine, I’m planing, the sole sticks, I whip around, wipe the sole by dragging the sole across the tin perched on my benchtop, and get on with the job. Quick, efficient, no playing around. Job done!

-- Paul Sellers, UK http://paulsellers.com/paul-sellers-blog

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1751 days


#7 posted 1000 days ago

thank´s Poul
now you made me hungry again even though I don´t deal with beans or tomato´s
other than grow them ….. LOL

one more question to your oilrag …. we all know that a oily rag can self ignit and burn
does you put it in a safe place when you shot down for the day or do you have another can
that fits right over it as lid :-)

Dennis

View Paul Sellers's profile

Paul Sellers

277 posts in 1206 days


#8 posted 1000 days ago

Never heard of spontaneous combustion with three in-one-oil. Don’t know if it’s valid or not. Anyone? Better find out. I have done this for 45 years now.

-- Paul Sellers, UK http://paulsellers.com/paul-sellers-blog

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1751 days


#9 posted 1000 days ago

I sure don´t know either
we just hear it all the times with other oil things including blo
but with 45 years behind the test it seems to be pretty safe :-)

take care
Dennis

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6810 posts in 1787 days


#10 posted 999 days ago

Thanks for sharing more of your knowledge and wisdom Paul!

I think the combustion thing is only a problem with curing oils like BLO or Tung oil that produce heat while they cure. The 3-1 doesnt cure as far as I know.

My concern with the 3-1 oil would be it staining the wood or effecting your finish later but since you have been doing this for so long, it obviously is not an issue.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Paul Sellers's profile

Paul Sellers

277 posts in 1206 days


#11 posted 999 days ago

No issues with the oil on the wood for any reason. You’re right, in 45+ years working wood I never had any issues.

Best for now,

Paul

-- Paul Sellers, UK http://paulsellers.com/paul-sellers-blog

#12 posted 999 days ago

I can’t put into words how grateful I am for your videos. I look forward to each one you post.

Just another reminder why I’m getting away from my power tools.

-- Practice does not make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect. Vince Lombardi

View Paul Sellers's profile

Paul Sellers

277 posts in 1206 days


#13 posted 999 days ago

There will be more as time allows and I am glad they seem to be making a difference. Although we must all make a living, we must also share what knowledge we have. As a craftsman, my personal quest now is to pass on all that I know.

Thanks for the kind comments.

Best regards,

Paul

-- Paul Sellers, UK http://paulsellers.com/paul-sellers-blog

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4138 posts in 1587 days


#14 posted 998 days ago

Another excellent video, Paul. I’m learning a lot from these short tutorials.

I liked the part where you said, “Still looking for your router bit.” I do think the router would be faster if you had a bunch of lids and they were set up for a production run, but I for one would much rather prefer a roundover done by hand than one that had been machined. Looking forward to more videos.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View Paul Sellers's profile

Paul Sellers

277 posts in 1206 days


#15 posted 998 days ago

Ninety-nine point nine, nine, nine percent of woodworkers will never mass make a bunch of lids, or drawers or boxes with dovetails or many other things for that matter. They will need a router to run moulding on the edges of stock such as base trim or the nosings on shelves. That’s fine. I take issue when they, the catalog suppliers and manufacturers of machines and such, take simple aspects of woodworking and displace the sense of wellbeing you get from working with your hands creatively even if the machine does it better. My videos will continue to come for free to even out the disparity that has gone on for far too long so that those woodworkers looking for real woodworking can find it and believe that it work not just for me but them also. I have been in full time woodworking as a furniture maker for 47 years – that’s 141,000 hours of woodworking. Over 120,000 hand cut woodworking joints, millions of shavings from planes, spokeshaves and scrapers.

Go to my blog at www.paulsellers.com for bags more free stuff from my daily work in my workshop to learn more.

Best to all.

Join me in the Real Woodworking Campaign (RWC) for more changes to come too.

-- Paul Sellers, UK http://paulsellers.com/paul-sellers-blog

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