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Treasure Box - Series #2 - Post #4: Hot Sand Shading of the 2 inside panels

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Blog entry by Patricelejeune posted 08-01-2013 05:56 PM 1866 reads 4 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: 2nd Marquetry Panel Cut Part 4 of Treasure Box - Series #2 - Post series Part 5: Incrustation of marquetry on the assembly board »

It is time to do shading on those 2 first panels.

The first thing I do is put the sand to heat. We have a cast iron pan on a 1500W hot plate containing about 2 inches of very fine sand.

Second thing I do the shading map.

When I do it home at night, while watching TV I do get a little more artistic like for the Treasure box series #1

Here I did it at work and was more practical

The main action in shading is diping

Depending on the species of the wood and the thickness of the veneer, it takes more or less time to shade. Do not overdo it though, if it smokes, it is burnt.
This green for example takes time to reach the shading point, but then I have to be careful because when it starts, it is quick.

The angle you dip your piece also has its importance. The pieces on the left are dipped with a wide angle and away from the centre where the heat is greater. The more the angle the more the gradience of the shading. On right I put them straight in the sand and close to the center, for a short shadow.

Other example for the tree, I dip the root with an medium angle

When you dip with an angle do it on both side of the piece to have an homogenous exposure to the heat

The top part receive a shorter shadow so it is dip straight.

I want to add a bit of shading on the right side of the tree, so it looks like the light comes from the left and will give more volume to the piece.

But the root do not permit dipping, so it is time for spooning.

The same than for angle dipping shade both sides

A little video we did on spooning

here is the difference with or without spooning

Panel 1

panel 2

Both of them

Detail of the Drawing and the pieces

Next step, cutting the background on the Chevalet

-- Patrice lejeune



11 comments so far

View stefang's profile

stefang

13633 posts in 2088 days


#1 posted 08-01-2013 06:47 PM

Very interesting and informative Patrice. The shading certainly creates a 3 dimensional appearance.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Patricelejeune's profile

Patricelejeune

293 posts in 675 days


#2 posted 08-01-2013 10:23 PM

Sorry guys. I will finish that post as soon as AT&T gives us back our internet

-- Patrice lejeune

View tinnman65's profile

tinnman65

1178 posts in 2168 days


#3 posted 08-01-2013 11:03 PM

Great post Patrice, this was very informative on your shading practice. I learn something new every time you make a post.

-- Paul--- Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep. — Scott Adams

View Mathew Nedeljko's profile

Mathew Nedeljko

641 posts in 2584 days


#4 posted 08-02-2013 04:21 AM

Patrice, this is a great series! This is probably more descriptive of the shading process than any other source I have found online yet. Thank you for sharing your knowledge and techniques so openly!

-- Aim high. Ride easy. Trust God. Neale Donald Walsch

View lightweightladylefty's profile

lightweightladylefty

2765 posts in 2467 days


#5 posted 08-02-2013 04:37 AM

Patrice,

You are an incredible artist and an excellent teacher as well. Thanks for your willingness to share your talents.

L/W

-- Jesus is the ONLY reason for ANY season.

View shipwright's profile (online now)

shipwright

5319 posts in 1552 days


#6 posted 08-02-2013 06:06 AM

You make it look so easy Patrice.
if only it were…....... :-)

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View Dale J Struhar Sr's profile

Dale J Struhar Sr

361 posts in 1884 days


#7 posted 08-02-2013 02:02 PM

All I can say is WOW!

-- Dale, Ohio

View Frank Strazza's profile

Frank Strazza

10 posts in 1320 days


#8 posted 08-02-2013 09:20 PM

Patrice, where do you find such fine sand. Please don’t tell me the beach, its too far for me! :)

-- Heritage School of Woodworking

View Patricelejeune's profile

Patricelejeune

293 posts in 675 days


#9 posted 08-02-2013 09:49 PM

Thank you all again for those nice comments.

Mat, you have been at the School here couple times, and you know we do not teach for money, but to share. This posts can’t replace a real class but at least it passes as much info as possible. And the thank you for posting infos comes back right to you and Paul for telling us about lumberjocks and encouraging us to post.

Paul, it is not that easy, but you have been pretty good at it

I agree that learning all the little tricks is one thing but mastering them is only acquired by practice.

Frank, this sand was bought by Patrick in France. Traditionally it comes from Fontainebleau in France

When I was in France, I picked up mine directly in Fontainebleau. Real fine sand in a forest and sand stones for climbing

Here is an interesting article on that sand

http://throughthesandglass.typepad.com/through_the_sandglass/2010/02/two-museums-and-the-fontainebleau-glass-sand.html

Otherwise, very fine sand works anyway, wind blown sand seems the best. We tried sand for sand blasting, 2 kinds, did not work great.

Cheers

-- Patrice lejeune

View shipwright's profile (online now)

shipwright

5319 posts in 1552 days


#10 posted 08-03-2013 03:54 PM

Pet shops have very fine sand that they sell as “reptile sand” for your pet iguana.
Try to get one that hasn’t been dyed.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View Mathew Nedeljko's profile

Mathew Nedeljko

641 posts in 2584 days


#11 posted 08-04-2013 04:11 AM

Patrice thanks for that reference to the best sand for shading. When I start working with veneer from Georges I will have to upgrade to Fontainebleu sand too I guess.

In the meantime, I have had good success with this sand, its very fine, white, and takes the heat very well with no odor.

-- Aim high. Ride easy. Trust God. Neale Donald Walsch

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