LumberJocks

Treasure Box III - Post #5: Chêne de Tronçais - Tronçais' Oak

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Patricelejeune posted 12-02-2018 09:42 PM 776 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Cutting Marquetry Part 5 of Treasure Box III - Post series Part 6: Frisage / Parquetry »

I have been working more on the Treasure Boxes than on the blog…

I could cut down the blog and fast forward to now, closer to the end, but I understand some of you like the step by step appoach.

One of the reason I have not been updating our progress as much as usual, and I am usually not great at it anyway, is that the first box was ordered 11 months ago, on drawing alone. It was bought by the wife of one of our best client for a big birthday, one with a brand new zero in it. The down side was that we had only 9 months to bring one of the 4 boxes to a presentation stage for the big date.

It is a small series so we worked on the 4 of them as much as possible and focused on the first one in the last couple months to bring it to presentation. We usually take 2 years to complete a series of 4 boxes, with all the other work and the fact that this box is the most comlplicated one we made so far, iit has been quite a challenging and very busy year.

One way we saved on time was with the carcass. On the previous 2 boxes we used european beech, one of the best wood we have access to, here, in San Diego, but we wanted to upgrade for something special and as Patrick was really busy working on a 14 foot dining room table, we contacted our friend Florian Bourgine in France.

He proposed to use Tronçais oak for the carcasse, a great white oak to work with.

Tronçais is a forest in Allier, France, that has had areas protected since the 17th century. A lot of the French oak forest where created by Colbert in 1670 when he bacame minister to Louis the XIVth. He ordered 2,5 million acres to be planted in order to become the first naval country and avoid the prediction of shortage of old growth tall oak for boat building by the year 2000. Talk about long term politics.
Today, in Tronçais, there is still a protected area of about 9000 acres with some trees closing to 500 years old.

Florian Bourgine had easy access to that great wood and I knew his quality as a woodworker, so we asked him to help us, in our need of hurry and quality in equal measure, by cutting and preparing as much as possible of the wood before hand.

Dimensions and type of joinery wanted.

(photos by Florian Bourgine)

Ready to ship.

While in the meantime I was working on the marquetry panels.

-- Patrice lejeune



7 comments so far

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8166 posts in 3001 days


#1 posted 12-02-2018 10:34 PM

Great choice. Florian is very good.
Looks like he did not disappoint.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View ugoboy's profile

ugoboy

109 posts in 3237 days


#2 posted 12-02-2018 10:37 PM

Hey Patrice – nice to see the progression of the boxes. I to am working on a box. A tool box for my Son. I hope to have completed by Xmas. I am planning on doing a little marquetry on the front and inside lids of the box. Cant wait for the next post. Once I am a little further I will document my progress.

-- ~ Guy Woodward, Pflugerville Texas

View Sodabowski's profile

Sodabowski

2383 posts in 3036 days


#3 posted 12-02-2018 11:03 PM

Wow I had no idea we had such a huge protected oak zone! Thanks for the info and update on this series :)

-- Thomas - Pondering the inclusion of woodworking into physics and chemistry classes...

View Patricelejeune's profile

Patricelejeune

381 posts in 2123 days


#4 posted 12-02-2018 11:05 PM



Wow I had no idea we had such a huge protected oak zone! Thanks for the info and update on this series :)

- Sodabowski

I like that article sent by Florian

-- Patrice lejeune

View madburg's profile

madburg

210 posts in 1046 days


#5 posted 12-03-2018 12:21 AM

Thanks for the update Patrice, and the fascinating article by Florian. The dovetails look very chunky, and brought to mind the opposite end of the dovetail scale which I came across while researching a Japanese woodworker, Suda Kenji – a Japanese ‘Living National Treasure’. Check out these two videos which for me are quite inspirational on par with your work Patrice – but alas no marquetry in sight!

Suda Kenji - sake cup

Suda Kenji - British Museum

-- Madburg WA

View stefang's profile

stefang

16140 posts in 3537 days


#6 posted 12-03-2018 01:54 PM

Very interesting blog.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Sodabowski's profile

Sodabowski

2383 posts in 3036 days


#7 posted 12-03-2018 10:37 PM


Wow I had no idea we had such a huge protected oak zone! Thanks for the info and update on this series :)

- Sodabowski

I like that article sent by Florian

- Patricelejeune

Indeed, very interesting and quite impressive also. I’ll have to check with the in-laws’ cousins as they operate a rather big sawmill company, maybe they have access to that wood also. Thanks for the link, mate!

-- Thomas - Pondering the inclusion of woodworking into physics and chemistry classes...

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com