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Some new planes i found on craigslist

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Blog entry by PaBull posted 1325 days ago 2296 reads 0 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Yesterday afternoon I responded to an ad incraigslist. No pictures, it said:

“I have a large collection of antique wood working tools, planes, levels, augers, etc. that I need to sell.
A few modern as well. All original and in great shape for their age. No fakes.
Fair prices. , Cash only “

I spend all the $160 I had in my pocket. I could have spend a $1000. I felt like a kid in the candy store.

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Here is the whole collection on my garage floor.

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This is the Stanley router #71, all complete as far as i can see.

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Stanley #51 spoke shave. (Thanks Rwyoung for the correction)

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Stanley #7 with 3 pat’n #’s.

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Bed Rock Stanley #605

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Just a #4 “old and ugly” (I did not pay much for this guy)

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Stanley #3 with 3 pat’n numbers

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I was very happy with this plane and the router on top.

-- rhykenologist and plant grower



15 comments so far

View Greg The Cajun Box Sculptor's profile

Greg The Cajun Box Sculptor

4736 posts in 1809 days


#1 posted 1325 days ago

Looks like a great purchase and $160 well spent. Now you can have fun cleaning them up. They will really look great.

-- Every step of each project is considered my masterpiece because I want the finished product to reflect the quality of my work. http://www.FineArtBoxes.com

View rwyoung's profile

rwyoung

369 posts in 1973 days


#2 posted 1325 days ago

I think you mean #51 SPOKE SHAVE and not a “spook plane”.

You nearly got your $160 worth on just the compass plane alone if it is in good shape. No popped rivets or blown welds?

-- Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8473 posts in 2149 days


#3 posted 1325 days ago

awesome find!

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View William's profile (online now)

William

8517 posts in 1343 days


#4 posted 1325 days ago

I’m not much into hand planes and such, but am fascinated with antique tools. Would you please explain the router to me. I’ve never seen or heard of one. Does is take different buts like modern routers? Do you just run it along edges to route profile or is there some other specific technique to it? I tried searching on the internet and got just thousands of pages of modern router for sale. I’d love to know more about this one though.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

14592 posts in 1368 days


#5 posted 1325 days ago

Here's a site that might interest you. A lot of craftsmen used them for inlay and what not.

BTW, I’ve got a Stanley router plane and I need some blades for it. If anyone has one or two that would fit this I’d sure be interested if you want to sell them.

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View PaBull's profile

PaBull

926 posts in 2166 days


#6 posted 1325 days ago

http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan10.htm
Yes it has different cutters, but the one example use I can think of is mortise out a style of a door for a barrel hinge.
Not really a router for edge details.

-- rhykenologist and plant grower

View chilimac's profile

chilimac

22 posts in 1399 days


#7 posted 1325 days ago

Looks like a good haul.

I’ve only got a couple of cheapies from Home Depot, but have been looking to upgrade without spending much… so I’ve been looking at swap meets. Found a few that looked like stanley #3 or #4, about $25-$35,. Would those be good prices, obviously condition varies.

-- Big discoveries don't go "Eureka!", they go "Huh. That's funny..." They just as frequently go *bang* and *woosh*...

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1616 days


#8 posted 1325 days ago

can you bee there….......if not then just send them to me ….niice score hope they will servee you well
if not then just send them to me …...did I tell you that you can send them to mee….LOL

Dennis

View swirt's profile

swirt

1914 posts in 1473 days


#9 posted 1325 days ago

Wow, nice score. And yes I am jealous.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View Div's profile

Div

1653 posts in 1441 days


#10 posted 1325 days ago

Just that #113(the compass plane) alone is worth the deal. Don’t worry about the green glow on the horizon….it is just me!

-- Div @ the bottom end of Africa. "A woodworker's sharpest tool should be his mind."

View Gerry's profile

Gerry

250 posts in 1742 days


#11 posted 1325 days ago

Great Find! Now if only I could find such as that here…...........

-- -Gerry, Hereford, AZ ” A really good woodworker knows how the hide his / her mistakes.”

View rwyoung's profile

rwyoung

369 posts in 1973 days


#12 posted 1325 days ago

Router planes such as the #71 and #71-1/2 are designed to produce a flat surface below a reference surface. That is to say, they create a flat bottomed dado, groove or other cavity. They are not intended to make
profiles in the way an electric router with a spinning bit can.

They are not terribly efficient at removing large quantities of material. Chisels and saws are good at that. The router plane can come along after and be used to take off that last 32nd to get things just right. That isn’t to say you can’t use them with a depth stop and hog out material, just that they aren’t well suited to that.

Router planes can also be used to level the background for inlay, as well as sizing tenon cheeks.

The replacement blades from Lee Valley will fit the Stanley router planes. Also you can order replacement blades direct from Stanley. The LN model, the blades (as I understand it) do not fit. To use the Lee Valley blades you need to flip the adjuster nut over so the rim that catches the blade shaft is at the top.

There are also smaller router planes, the Stanley 271 for example as well as other manufacturers. And you can find wooden and pattern maker made planes too. A less than complementary nick-name for these planes is “hag’s tooth” or “old woman’s tooth” plane.

-- Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1616 days


#13 posted 1325 days ago

you don´t need a seperat deptstop is build in to a router :-)
and its a great tool to go your groves/dado´s after iether if they are made with a plane or
a tablesaw dadoblades then you are sure it has the dept all over the lenght

View BigTiny's profile

BigTiny

1664 posts in 1389 days


#14 posted 1325 days ago

You can make your own blades for the router plane by grinding down an allen key/hex wrench. Just quench it often to keep it from overheating on the grinder and losing the temper.

-- The nicer the nice, the higher the price!

View GaryD's profile

GaryD

620 posts in 1870 days


#15 posted 1325 days ago

Nice score. Dont run into much of this in Myrtle Beach

-- Gary, Little River,SC I've Learned that the Lord didn't do it all in one day and neither can I

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