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Lathe work using math!

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Blog entry by PGreene posted 12-28-2010 02:49 AM 1441 reads 1 time favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Check out these links I recently found on a mathematics website. Very interesting stuff!

http://blog.makezine.com/archive/2010/06/math_monday_mathematical_lathe_work.html

http://blog.makezine.com/archive/2010/12/math_monday_mathematical_lathe_work_1.html

-- Patrick



11 comments so far

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3143 days


#1 posted 12-28-2010 08:28 AM

WOw!! I’m not sure I want to go there?? If I ever have too much time on my hands, maybe ;-)) Thanks for the post.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5314 posts in 3180 days


#2 posted 12-28-2010 02:15 PM

It would be very interesting to see these being turned!

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

View Sawdust2's profile

Sawdust2

1467 posts in 3555 days


#3 posted 12-28-2010 02:24 PM

Mindboggling – with the mind I don’t have
Time consuming – with the patience I don’t have.
Wonderful – with the awe I have for both (or all).

Lee

-- No piece is cut too short. It was meant for a smaller project.

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3201 posts in 2306 days


#4 posted 12-28-2010 03:40 PM

I checked out your links and as a former teacher and a parent who is happy to have survived having three daughters in public school, I can’t help but wonder if you are a math teacher? Then my mind wanders to include- well, if he’s a math teacher he must teach advanced math/gifted education? My thoughts continue to wander- well, how could a public school teacher justify using that much class time to use these types of lesson plans? maybe it’s a math club? extracurricular? And who pays for the materials? There is no budget for this stuff. And where do you store that many projects so they dont get stolen or trashed or lost? (And please kind sir, please don’t tell me this is an “out of class” assignment- where mom has to do it and has to pay for all the materials, then drive it (and my kid) back to school to turn in the project (mom) made -just in time to display for parent/teacher conference/ open house night. ;)

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

View PGreene's profile

PGreene

114 posts in 2897 days


#5 posted 12-28-2010 11:13 PM

Wow Rivergirl, you really made a lot of assumptions there! Let’s see…I was a teacher, but not a math teacher. I taught US History. Currently I am an administrator at a large public high school. I feel your pain on the idea of budget cuts while wanting to maintain high levels of educational experiences for our children. I have to say that I would support something like what I posted in these links. Any time children can gain from creating something with their hands and using their brains, real learning can take place. This year I have devoted a great deal of my time toward writing grants to make this happen in my school though the integration of technology in remedial English and Algebra classes. The children I help support with this grant often do not have the parental support or finances for the basics to help make themselves successful. From your post I can see that you’ve had quite a bit of experience helping your children with school projects. I just hope you had a better attitude toward their experiences than you did toward my post.

-- Patrick

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rivergirl

3201 posts in 2306 days


#6 posted 12-29-2010 03:20 PM

PGreene, I think I only made one assumption- that you were a math teacher. The rest was not assumed- just reflected upon. And frankly, since you are a prinicipal I wasn’t that far off the mark. I think you figured out pretty quickly that I was a teacher. ;) I would love to tell you that being a teacher in public education, and having three children who survived public education was a positive experience for me, however the converse is true. As a teacher I am certified in 7 areas, including special ed, reading, MS math, MS Englishand special education, elementary education, and early childhood education. Principal cert is completed but never applied for. Not interested. US HIstory is a hobby interest for me and I could pass the Praxis with my eyes closed if I so desired. In addition to teaching in the public school classroom I also worked as the data specialist, and reading specialist. I have also written and procured grants, including the 21st Century grant (500,000) for the middle school. I designed a remedial reading program THAT WORKS, and I wrote curriculum. As for your supporting (adminstratively) the type of activities you posted in the links, well sir that is terrific. However, in the real world of education (outside of gifted ed) there are few students, fewer teachers and even fewer administrators who possess the skills necessary to teach and learn what you have suggested. As for the integration of technology into the classroom, the old adage applies: “Curriculum does not teach, TEACHERS teach.” Yet we continually pour millions of dollars into “technology” that consistently breaks and quickly becomes outdated. This is not to say that we shouldn’t use computers in the classroom, but that we should emphasize, support and defend quality educators and reduced student teacher ratios over technology. Personally I prefer books and ensuring students can read and comprehend grade level text and calculate mathematically well enough to ensure students can accurately tell me how much a full ounce of weed (or Wheaties) really costs. Then give me the correct change- using mental math- after I make my purchase. I am sick to death of hearing about Japan’s lead in technology- yes of course they lead- their students are taught to read and calculate. Then they grow up and create. My negative attitude toward public education is something I am not ashamed of. My experiences have taught me that there is no real interest in student academic achievement in public education. It is all a fascade. While salaries of teachers and administrators continue to soar, the student achievement tests get easier to ensure that schools make the required annual progess and to perpetuate the myth that “no child is left behind.” As far as my having experience “helping (my) children with school projects, well let me say that as a special educator I had too much experience trying to help children with disabilities survive the projects that were inappropriate to their current ability and skill level. Teachers refuse to modifiy, principals refuse to support special educators, and superintendents are too busy placating the school board to care about what is happening in room 221. So dear sir, you can post all the Maslow’s “high level thinking skill” math links that you desire. This is still America. And I will continue to read them, if nothing else to serve to start my day off with a laugh. For the record, my SO Len is a retired educator with 32 years in special education and 3 in Vietnam. Betweenn us we have five college educated kids, who are smarter and better educated than most teachers I know. Thankfully NONE are teachers. ;)

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3143 days


#7 posted 12-29-2010 08:19 PM

I nominate rivergirl for secretary of education. My wife is a library aid. the teacher who is in charge of computer lab let the kids play on the computers. My wife suggested they should be learning the keyboard. Duh?? Another 5th grade kid could not add 2 columns of numbers. Took her less than a week to get him doing. 5 years with the “pros” and nobody helped the kid figure it out!!

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View PGreene's profile

PGreene

114 posts in 2897 days


#8 posted 12-29-2010 08:37 PM

Wow! I just wanted to post what I thought were some pretty nice turnings on the lathe! Didn’t mean to start a debate on the condition of American education. I am sorry that you all have had such bad experiences with public schools. There is no denying that there are real problems in our nation related to how we educate children. Please do know that there are schools out there that do get it right. The school I have worked at for the past 2 years is truly one of those schools. We have received multiple Siemens Awards, multiple listings among the Top 500 American High Schools list and it is the only school in NC to ever achieve high growth status on AYP reports for 10 consecutive years. No school is perfect, and none ever will be. Schools rely on strong leaders, talented teachers, strong parent support and adequate funding. In short, schools take hard work from dedicated and talented individuals. I truly do feel sorry for everyone that has not had an opportunity to experience that.

Again…just intended to show some neat turnings.

-- Patrick

View JJohnston's profile (online now)

JJohnston

1614 posts in 2759 days


#9 posted 12-29-2010 08:53 PM

Don’t worry, PGreene. I spent several years in public schools, and I was able to read the captions on the pictures, so I, at least, knew what you were getting at.

-- "A man may conduct himself well in both adversity and good fortune, but if you want to test his character, give him power." - Abraham Lincoln

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3143 days


#10 posted 12-29-2010 09:15 PM

I survived them too, but in a different era ;-) sorry PGreene, some of us are too opinionated. Glad you are working to make a difference. The turnings are great and an inspiration for us all.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3201 posts in 2306 days


#11 posted 12-29-2010 09:46 PM

:) Here’s to you Topomax.

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

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