LumberJocks

Rescued Wood #18: Name This Wood ?

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Blog entry by PG_Zac posted 1662 days ago 1021 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 17: Flamboyant Crotch Anyone? Part 18 of Rescued Wood series no next part

A couple of years ago someone gave me a grotty old roof beam from a demolished building. Two days ago I needed a plank as an Alaskan guide rail and this old beam was just the right size, but needed to be cleaned up to give my jig a smooth ride. This is what showed up after planing and sanding.

Does anyone know what this wood is? I suspect it may be Oregon Pine purely because of it’s age and where/how is was used. I’d like to know if it worth getting the nails out of it and using it for a project sometime, or if it should stay relegated to the “general construction wood” section of my stock.

Face Grain

.

.

End Grain

.

.
The tight grained section which is towards the outside of the tree has about 30 growth rings per inch so I guess the tree was old growth.

Thanks.

-- I may be schizophrenic, but at least I have each other.



12 comments so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112016 posts in 2210 days


#1 posted 1662 days ago

Looks like douglas fir.
or southern yellow pine.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View sphere's profile

sphere

109 posts in 1664 days


#2 posted 1662 days ago

Agreed, my $$ is on DF.

-- Spheramid Enterprises Architectural Wood Works

View Andy's profile

Andy

1535 posts in 2541 days


#3 posted 1662 days ago

Douglas Fir, old growth by the ring count.
Outside of the Pacific Northwest it is often called Oregon Pine.
Here in Oregon we just call it Doug Fir.

-- If I can do it, so can you. www.artboxesbyandy.com

View PG_Zac's profile

PG_Zac

366 posts in 2022 days


#4 posted 1662 days ago

Thanks for your input guys. I’m pretty sure Southern yellow pine was never imported into South Africa as we have more than enough pine of our own. I suspect (I could be wrong) that Douglas fir also was not generally imported.

Oregon pine on the other hand enjoyed great popularity in the 20’s to the 60’s and was imported by the boatload mainly for flooring and roof beams in the spate of lower end residential development around the mines.

I don’t have personal experience of any of these woods, so I’ll take the consensus of the majority.

PS
I started my reply before Andy posted. Thanks Andy – so I guess this IS Doug Fir AND Oregon Pine.

Cool

Thanks.

-- I may be schizophrenic, but at least I have each other.

View antmjr's profile

antmjr

262 posts in 1817 days


#5 posted 1661 days ago

What astounds me is the quality of this lumber…used as a roof beam! Incredible. Now I have difficulties to find such a quality even in first grade lumber (here in Italy, not in USA or Canada obviously).

-- Antonio

View Enthalpy's profile

Enthalpy

44 posts in 1675 days


#6 posted 1661 days ago

Bald Cypress..well over 100 years old

View Enthalpy's profile

Enthalpy

44 posts in 1675 days


#7 posted 1661 days ago

Could be a Bald Eagle..but I see no feathers

View mmh's profile

mmh

3389 posts in 2355 days


#8 posted 1661 days ago

Isn’t it interesting to see how international our LJ group is on these postings? To think that lumber of pine is treasured in Italy and thought of as basic construction grade wood in the USA. As I am located in Maryland, redwood and yellow cedar (west coast/Canada) is pricey for my area, yet cherry, maple, poplar, black walnut, oak, are considered common hardwoods. I did spy some decent birdseye maple in HD a few months ago, and failed to purchase it as it was only 1 inch thick (I use 5/4 or thicker stock for my canes.).

-- "They who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night." ~ Edgar Allan Poe

View PG_Zac's profile

PG_Zac

366 posts in 2022 days


#9 posted 1661 days ago

I would (almost) kill for some decently figured wood like bird’s eye Maple, or even better, quilted maple of ANY thickness.

I have to go to a specialist importer about 2 hours drive away to get anything like Maple, Padauk, Oak, Walnut – the stuff you take for granted in the USA. Not only are they a long drive away, they are also expensive.

On the other hand, I have cheap (free) access to Wild Plum, Yellowwood, Litchi, Natal Mahogany – stuff you guys would salivate over.

-- I may be schizophrenic, but at least I have each other.

#10 posted 1661 days ago

that my friend is old growth douglas fir what im woundering is how it got to where u livewhat kind of history is behind a wood that is native to the pacific north west ended up in another country

-- i wonder if obama stood in a wind storm with them big ears of his would he start spinning like a drill bit

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

422 posts in 1716 days


#11 posted 1661 days ago

Yep…Old growth Douglas Fir, no question.

I bet it’s hard as a rock by now as well.

-- "The trouble with people idiot-proofing things, is the resulting evolution of the idiot."

View antmjr's profile

antmjr

262 posts in 1817 days


#12 posted 1661 days ago

well mmh, maybe I was slightly misunderstood: I wasn’t referring to any pine, but to Douglas Fir…and not any Douglas Fir, but sound Douglas Fir without knots or other defects. Here such quality lumber was always used for window frames or for matchboarding, not for roof beams :-)

-- Antonio

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