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Milk paint.

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Blog entry by Oneil posted 1193 days ago 2181 reads 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I am looking for any tips and tricks for using and finishing milk painted furniture. I am nearing completion of a shaker style blanket chest out of soft maple and am toying with the idea of milk painting the main box and leaving the top and plinth natural.
What is the best way to finish a milk painted surface?
Thanks.



11 comments so far

View hObOmOnk's profile

hObOmOnk

1380 posts in 2633 days


#1 posted 1193 days ago

I make my own milk paint and teach its use.
For premixed milk paints and instructions, I recommend this site/source:

Real Milk Paint.

You can also buy milk paint from Lee Valley:

Lee Valley Milk Paint.

-- 温故知新

View spunwood's profile

spunwood

1193 posts in 1341 days


#2 posted 1193 days ago

I used milk paint from general finishes on my doll beds and it came out really great, but I would thin the paint with water next time. The GF brand has a bit of a luster to it which is nice. There is an article in Fine Woodworking about milk paint, you can do a 14 day free trail membership and see the pdf.

-- I came, I was conquered, I was born again. ἵνα ὦσιν ἓν

View hObOmOnk's profile

hObOmOnk

1380 posts in 2633 days


#3 posted 1193 days ago

So called GF “Milk Paint” is actually a water-base acrylic polymer paint that, despite its name, is in no way related to traditional milk paints. The only ingredient common in both is water. However, the GF product produces a flat finish the mimics real milk paint.

A much better brand of simulated milk paint is Old Village Paints.

-- 温故知新

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3198 posts in 1343 days


#4 posted 1193 days ago

I like the Village line of milk paint but I have found that really ANY paint will work for a rustic/primitive finish. I take any free paint I can get my hands on and I often mix the paint to get the color I want. I think the trick for lack of a better word for a good prim finish is to apply the paint using a dry brush technique and apply the paint in layers. For example, I use black under red and brown under mustard. Many people use only one color but I think the result is much nicer/more authentic with layered paint. I do one layer- dry it with a hair dryer then apply the second layer. Use a dry brush technique on the second layer and let some of the paint underneat show through here and there. Once the paint is dry- but not too dry- sand the hell out of it. Don’t just sand around the edges and “wear spots” but apply a lot of sanding with a palm sander 150 grit. It’s a bit scary at first to sand that heavily, but after a while it gets much easier to just go to it. :) I find that sanding it within a hour of two of “dry” makes the sanding easier and it comes off less evenly making the wear marks look more authentic. And don’t panic if you think you sanded too much, and don’t worry about paint lines etc. etc. because the final wipe on/wipe off dark stain really works it all into one cohesive … well worn… mess? LOL I use ebony stain on reds and a dark walnut stain on the others. But I tend to use what I have and what I can get for free. :) Hope this helps.

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

View hObOmOnk's profile

hObOmOnk

1380 posts in 2633 days


#5 posted 1193 days ago

Catsup on caviar comes to mind. :)

I like to err on the side of tradition and authenticity.
It’s what my clients expect.

-- 温故知新

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3198 posts in 1343 days


#6 posted 1193 days ago

Hobo- in honor of tradition and authenticity then do you use only powerless hand tools as well? Or are a planer, jointer, table saw et. utilized?

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

View hObOmOnk's profile

hObOmOnk

1380 posts in 2633 days


#7 posted 1193 days ago

I try to acquire skills not tools.
I follow the grain…

-- 温故知新

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3198 posts in 1343 days


#8 posted 1192 days ago

So I take it you are a woodwright shop type of builder? I would love to see some pics of your work. Do you have a website?

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

View hObOmOnk's profile

hObOmOnk

1380 posts in 2633 days


#9 posted 1192 days ago

Got Milk paint?

-- 温故知新

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3198 posts in 1343 days


#10 posted 1192 days ago

LOL That was funny. I do like the Old Village Milk Paints. I always use their red wagon red and also like the mustard very well.

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

View Oneil's profile

Oneil

17 posts in 1198 days


#11 posted 1189 days ago

Thanks for the help, i will post some pics of the finished chest as soon as it is done!!

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