LumberJocks

Three drawer hall cerdenza #2: Determining how to detail the legs

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Blog entry by Oldtool posted 03-04-2018 09:54 PM 456 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Start to a new project requiring new techniques Part 2 of Three drawer hall cerdenza series Part 3: Third & Final in Series »

For the better part of the last two weeks I’ve been attempting to determine how to apply a bead & set-back plane to the front legs, to look something like this:

My first thought was to create the side beads the length of the leg, using a simple scratch stock. This proved to be feasible, as shown here:

This proved easy when referencing the tool on the side of the practice leg, but then came the semicircular portion I wanted to use. Multiple attempts failed, as follows:
First – the freehand attempt;

Second, an attempt that used a form to follow:

So back to the internet to try and find a solution that produces an accurate unwavering end bead, and I came across this Lie-Niesen produced tool that is called the Latta Radius tool for inlay work:

My attempt to make one of these worked out well, coming up with this:

This one I made will accept mounting the blade either in line with the tool for circular beads:

or in the same manner as L-N’s for stringing a radius:

As I said, it worked out well – but only on flat surfaces.

I also tried to freehand a straight bead, using alcohol to soften the wood first, no go, chip out:

Further research found this fenced beading tool, that I thought might scrape out a nice set back field, but this too proved no good as by referencing on the corners of the leg allowed the tool to rock sideways.

Repeated attempts of all kinds all proved to be a disaster:

So, back to square one, and what I should have probably done in the first place, carving the set-back by hand. Trying this on both the pine and maple practice legs appears to be a feasible solution:

So now, I’m going to carve the set back using standard bench chisels, I have no carving gouges, and put on the full length bead ( or cove, or round over ) with a regular scratch stock, and I only need to figure out the element running across the round-over portion.

The next blog will have pictures of the nicely detailed legs, or the fire I started with them.

Any suggestions on “how to” are welcome, wish me luck.
Thanks for viewing.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln



9 comments so far

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2603 posts in 644 days


#1 posted 03-04-2018 10:18 PM

Tom, I personally like the hand carved approach. Run your bead with the scratch stock vertically, and then fashion a small handle for the scratch stock blade and free-hand the bead across the round over. I’m also wondering if perhaps a file box might help facilitate the bead across the round over. This will be an awesome detail. Good luck!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2619 posts in 2187 days


#2 posted 03-04-2018 11:16 PM

Thank you Ron for the suggestion, however I don’t know what a file box is, and Google only shows wooden crates for “woodworking file box”.

Got a description?

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2603 posts in 644 days


#3 posted 03-04-2018 11:22 PM


Thank you Ron for the suggestion, however I don t know what a file box is, and Google only shows wooden crates for “woodworking file box”.

Got a description?

- Oldtool

Tom, please see my blog post Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu #2: To the File Box!  This is the contraption I used to make the barley twist split spindle on my last Prie Dieu.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2619 posts in 2187 days


#4 posted 03-04-2018 11:35 PM

Thanks Ron, I’ll look into something like this for the detail on my legs. Thinking about it, I guess it could be used to work the set-back area, but I’ll need to be careful about movement under chisel pressure.
Thanks for the help.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

2148 posts in 578 days


#5 posted 03-04-2018 11:52 PM

I think I would end up free-handing it as well. I’d draw the curve on a piece of paper, glue it in place, and then carve freehand with a chisel or gouge, but if I couldn’t make that fly, Ron’s file box would be the next trick I’d try.

I get a lot of mileage out of paper and a glue stick lately. The legs for the box I’m building for the swap have glued-on templates so I stand some chance of having all four look somewhat alike.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2619 posts in 2187 days


#6 posted 03-05-2018 12:00 AM

I’m leaning to free handing the carving as you said Dave. I learned a lot about carving this maple on the practice leg, cut with the grain – like hand planing – while not cutting across the grain because it had a tendency to chip out. However having said that, the nail box will make a good depth measuring device, confirmation of my progress.
Anyway, nothing ventured, nothing gained. I can alwsys make more legs.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

2148 posts in 578 days


#7 posted 03-05-2018 12:13 AM

One trick for freehand carving cross-grain I discovered (I’m not very good, but I’m practicing carving in my copious free time) was using either a marking knife, marking gauge, or dividers to score across the grain to help me avoid tear-out / chip out. I find myself wondering if there’s some way you could score that curve — maybe make a template in veneer in the flat, and score through that with a marking knife after you’ve bent it onto the leg? Maybe that’d give you an edge to reference from…

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2619 posts in 2187 days


#8 posted 03-05-2018 12:27 AM

Dave,
I’ll probably try all you and Ron suggested, because I plan to go slow, so slow in fact that my wife will think I’m sleeping at the work bench, should she be looking for me that is.
Seriously, going to go very slow, trying various techniques, avoiding those that don’t produce desired results. I’ve never really “carved” before, so learn as I go is always my modus operandi.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

2148 posts in 578 days


#9 posted 03-05-2018 12:50 AM

That sounds like a plan to me. I’ll be interested to see what works for you.

The only other thing I can think of at the moment is somehow carving in the flat before you make the curved surface on the leg, and then making the curve later. I can’t quite make that work in my brain though. But when I’m stumped on how to do something, it’s often because I’m doing things in the wrong order. Cut the dado before assembling the box, and it’ll be a lot easier to put in the bottom (only took one failed box to learn that one) for example.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

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