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Mini V8 Workbench Build #2: Continuing Prep of Frame Lumber

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Blog entry by Ocelot posted 04-20-2015 02:42 PM 1188 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Beginning Part 2 of Mini V8 Workbench Build series no next part

As I wrote in the “Beginning” blog entry, I have lots of thin lumber on the rack so decided to build up the thicker lumber needed for this project. Honestly, I’ve never done that before, so although I enjoy playing around with the planer and just seeing, feeling and smelling the wood, as I went, I was think that this is a lot of trouble for just a little bit of lumber, but in the end, I enjoyed the process and will do it again.

This is more beginner stuff, probably boring to read if you’ve done it a few times.

I spent a few minutes figuring out how I was going to clamp the glueup. Here is a dry fit of how the clamping will work.

I’ve taken out one pair for gluing and here is the boy watching. A few moments before this he was sucking on a wrench he picked up. LOL. Yeah, he’s still a baby, but he’s a smart one.

Spreading too much glue. I often use my RAS table and extension for various other work, then I have to clean it off so I can crosscut something.

4 pairs, all glued and clamped.

24 hours later, clamps off. I had to beat on ‘em a little because a drop of glue here and there had things stuck together which were not supposed to be.

Here are the glued-up pieces after ripping/jointing on the table saw. Also see the thinner (5/8”) side rails which I had left oversized at this point until I adjust my rip fence so that they are no longer getting burned. These are just sitting on the RAS table because that’s a place to put things in my disorganized shop.

Finished ripping the thinner side rails to final width (3 3/4”) after adjusting fence more parallel with the blade. No burn now. The thick glued-up pieces have been left at 4 1/4” wide but the ends squared now.

I don’t have dust collection on my table saw – but only on the planer and bandsaw.

Thinking constantly about this project – day and night, actually.

I’ve figured out how I want to do a few things.

Since the glued up wood is thicker than called for, and I’d hate to just plane off the excess, I’m changing all the 1 1/4” thick parts to 1 3/8” except the “chop” (don’t know why it’s call that) of the vise, which I’ll change to 1 1/2”.

Also, I plan to cut the doghole blocks from the excess length on the ends of these pieces – so that the doghole blocks will be 1 3/8” square rather than 1 3/32” which would be 5/8ths of 1 3/4” from the original design.

Also, since I have 1/2” extra width on these boards, I plan to saw off strips 5/16” thick (by 1 3/8” wide) which will be used as part of the top cladding between the 1 3/8” square dog holes blocks.

I’m questioning whether I should stick to scaling the dog holes. At 5/8 scale, the dog holes should be 7/16. I can get 7/16 dowel. I could slightly upsize and use 1/2” which makes sense – especially since I think I can get bloodwood or purpleheart dowels in 1/2”. OR, I could use standard 3/4” dog holes – which would enable standard sized holdfasts to be used on this child-sized bench.

I already have some 3/4” purpleheart dowels which I could use if I went with 3/4”.

The dog holes in the bench could be 3/4 and the holes in the wagon vise 1/2.

I haven’t decided yet on that.

-Paul



7 comments so far

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7174 posts in 2263 days


#1 posted 04-20-2015 09:49 PM

Looks like you are doing the right thing Paul, thinking before you cut.
For my money, I would be selective about the scaling and basically just scale the major dimensions. As you have already noticed yourself there are some things that are the size they are for a good reason. Examples being the trough (deep enough for a plane lying on its side) and the dog holes (big enough for std. holdfasts should you later decide you want them).

I like your planning. You can never go wrong building it in your mind first ….... and as an added bonus you don’t have to replace pieces you cut too short in your mind. :-)

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2104 days


#2 posted 04-20-2015 10:40 PM

Thanks, Paul.

I haven’t posted all my thinkings yet.

I’m reconsidering on veneer the legs. I think I should just try to cut some shop-sawn veneer. The thing that put me off the veneer is doing the curved parts of the legs.

The legs under the bench will only be about 18” high.

I am thinking of sawing some veneer on the table saw. I can get a much smoother result than trying on the bandsaw, and easily make strips thin enough to bend.

What I have in mind is to simulate the look of the legs being built up out of boards. I don’t think it’s possible to make end-grain veneer, so I’m not trying that, but For the flat faces of the leg structures, if I cut strips 3” wide (which I think I can on the table saw – maybe even a bit wider), and make them say 1/8” thick, then bevel the edges, when glued up it would look like v-groove flooring (running horizontally) – emphasizing the separate “boards”. (6 boards to get 18”) Then on the front/back edges with the curves, I would use strips sawn much thinner, so that they can bent. I would then intentionally cut these at the places where their edges intersect a joint line in the 1/8” facing “boards”, and swap the strips around to simulate a joint line. These would be more like veneer, and would overlay the edges of the facing boards. The total thickness of the legs would be 2 19/32 (5 layers of 15/32 ply + 2 layers of 1/8 cladding). That’s thin enough for my table-sawn veneer to cover.

Well, I’ll probably try cutting some walnut like that. If it works, I’ll try to follow that path. If it doesn’t, no problem, I’m back to the dark stain. After all, who sees what’s under such a low bench anyway?

Unfortunately, this process doesn’t scale back up, since I can’t saw veneer wide enough on the table saw to cover the curved edges of the full-sized bench.

For the face cladding, I have two variants of what you did.

First, I’m planning to skip the MDF, and use 5/16” hardwood cladding.

Then, instead of using 2 solid boards to fill the space on either side of the line of dog-hole blocks, I would use strips sawn from the edge of a board. This would lead toward the illusion that the top was composed entirely of boards on edge. The lining of the tray would not be tucked under the edge, but would come up to the surface of the bench. To make this work better, I could glue up a multi-thickness board like I’ve done already and saw the cladding off the edge of the built-up board. Obviously, this is structurally inferiour, but if done well, should be fine.

A completely alternative approach would be to bookmatch the cladding on each slab. I like bookmatching. I don’t think I’ll do it that way this time, but if I did, the dog holes would not run down the centerline of the bookmatch. Since I’m not so good at making square holes, I would drill holes for the upper end of the dog-hole blocks, which I would have to round to fit. So the upper end of each block would be round where it penetrates the cladding. (I would buildi a fixture to do this using the router). Then the actual bookmatch glueup would be done in place as I glue the cladding in place.

OK. I think too much.

Thanks for looking in on this humble child,s play. Your jewelry box is absolutely awesome, by the way.

-Paul

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2104 days


#3 posted 04-20-2015 10:50 PM

One other thing. Since the side rails are only 47”...

If I build a booster to put under my dovetail jig, I can stand on a stool and use the router and dovetail jig to dovetail the rails. For the full size bench, I would have to stack two work benches and stand on a ladder to do that.

Well, if I can work out the spacing of the dovetails. I can’t recall if 3 3/4” width will work.

-Paul

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7174 posts in 2263 days


#4 posted 04-21-2015 12:02 AM

You’re right, you think too much.
But that said, it is a far better failing than not thinking enough.

When I was building boats I would have built the whole thing over in my head several times before I actually got to the making actual pieces. It really is amazing how many problems you can find and solve before they arise.

Keep planning and thinking. If nothing else it will keep your brain nimble. :-)

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2104 days


#5 posted 04-21-2015 02:00 PM

Paul,

In my work, if I am thinking about a project day and night, I am much more productive. Unfortunately, that doesn’t happen much anymore. I remember 2 years ago, I was off from work for spring break to spend some time with my oldest daughter (age 12 at the time), and I designed a very complicated process in my head without ever opening my computer all week. I was able to come back on the following monday and type it all up. It took me over a year to get around to implementing it, but it was pretty much designed on vacation entirely in my head.

When I put the flooring in the attic of my shop (2 layers of 7/16 OSB), I had the entire plan in my head (notching around trusses and arrangement of all the pieces in the two layers). I didn’t have to look at drawings to cut the pieces or assemble them. But then I found out that space I was flooring is not 40’ long – but 39’ 11”, which caused some pain for awhile.

I haven’t studied out your entire V8 yet, but after I do, I could probably build it from memory. That’s the way I usually do things.

Now, I think about woodworking – even when I’m at work, which is not ideal, but not 100% bad either.

-Paul

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2104 days


#6 posted 04-21-2015 02:20 PM

Paul,

Thanks for the photos. For example, it helps to see that you applied the side rails after the top cladding. That way the top cladding could be left a few thousandths wide and trimmed to fit before applying the side rails. I had not noticed before that you did it in that sequence.

Next on my agenda is to try to saw some walnut veneer and also start on the wagon vises. I plan to glue some walnut to a piece of pine so that I can saw all the walnut and still have something to push through the saw. While that glue sets, I can start on the wagon vises.

I saw one comment you made on your blog to the effect that for this case, you don’t really need the little shoulder on the special shipbuilding do-dad (can’t recall what you call it) – where the red arrow points…

It seems to me that if the side-rails of the wagon vise are fixed so that this shoulder does not seat against the mating shoulder, the construction makes more sense to me (as an engineer). If the shoulder is seated, then, unless the wedge and it’s mating surfaces on the side-rail are perfect, the wedge will not be seated.

At 5/8 scale, this shoulder is 5/64” wide.

Call you illuminate?

-Paul

-

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7174 posts in 2263 days


#7 posted 04-21-2015 03:10 PM

When this joint is used in boatbuilding it locks a jack beam or header into another deck beam. The angle supports the weight and insures that the fit is tight length wise and the shoulder prevents the header from dropping below the main beam’s top where the decking goes. Ideally, done well the shoulders just touch as the angled surfaces come tight.
It can be a challenging joint.
It is the way it is in my bench because it wouldn’t look right to me without the “ears” but you don’t need them to have it work.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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