LumberJocks

Equipping the Shop #8: Lumber Racks (and some lumber)

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Blog entry by Ocelot posted 02-07-2012 07:38 PM 2748 reads 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 7: Harbor Freight 5 Speed Bench Top Wood Lathe - Model #65345 Part 8 of Equipping the Shop series Part 9: Things you can do with a tiny Drill Press - by making a few jigs »

I was eating dinner with my old retired pastor back a few weeks (I think it was in December), when he mentioned that he was interested in selling the rough-cut lumber that he has collected for many years. He said he already had a taker on the walnut, but he had almost 2000 bft of air-dried cherry, some more than 30 years old, that he was interested in selling. Now this fine man has reached 80, and he’s realized that he’s not going to use all the bounty he has saved up.

A day or two later, I called and told him I wanted to buy a good bit of it if he could give me a price.

So, I’ve got 1000 bft of lumber – and had no place to store it.

Lumber racks were needed.

Unfortunately, the 5 minutes/month that I have for LJ has elapsed. Got to take the wife to the doc.

More about lumber and racks later.

-Paul



14 comments so far

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11561 posts in 1445 days


#1 posted 02-08-2012 02:22 AM

Paul, You are more than welcome to store it at my place for free! Wish you lived next door as I have tons of dry storage area.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Ocelot

666 posts in 1393 days


#2 posted 02-08-2012 10:05 AM

Thanks gfadvm!

But, I have a solution in work here so it won’t be neccesary to ship it out west there.

I was working on a design for a lumber rack – double sided, cantilever, and even mobile, and had bought the material and cut most of it out, when I saw a great deal on some lumber racks on eBay.

So, I bought the ebay rack for $145 plus $80 worth of gasoline to go get it.

Here it is in my shop.

But I’m still working on my home-built rack. All the materials are cut out. I have almost all the hardware.

Here’s a piece of it that I’ve completed. (Other pieces can be seen leaning on the right side of the steel rack). When I get the entire thing done, I’ll post it as a “project”. I haven’t posted any projects because the LJ guideliines say that it has to be a completed project and I don’t have any that I’m willing post yet, but the lumber rack will be one when it’s done.

The shop-built rack should have the capacity to store 340 cubic feet (4080 bft) of lumber if tightly packed. Of course, it will never be tightly packed. At 42 lb / cubic foot, that’s about 14000 pounds, which is close to the capacity of the 12×1200lb rated castors.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

666 posts in 1393 days


#3 posted 02-08-2012 10:28 AM

The main part of my shop-built mobile, double-sided, cantilever lumber rack (MDSCLR :) consists of “trees” designed as a sandwich structure. The arms, along with 2×6 spacers are sandwiched between two 2×6s to form a “tree” which slides down into/over a base made of 2 2×12s with spacers blocks between them – on which 2 1200lb rated 6in castors are mounted. Both the tree and the base are assembled with nails, and the upper tree is attached to the base with carriage bolts.

When I first layed one of these out on the floor, I realized that the construction materials were not of uniform thickness. The 2×4s were thinner than the 2×6s, so that the arms would be loose if I assembled it like that. So, I looked over at my newly aquired Griz 20in spiral planer and it just seemed natural that I should plane everything to a uniform 1 3/8 in. thickness. ...

So I did, and it went pretty quickly – so it was a good exercise for the planer, except that I didn’t figure on how much chips/dust that would make. As you can see below, the blueberries got mulched as a consequence.

Another consequence I didn’t think of when I decided to plane all that pine was that I might gum up my new planer with pine tar. I haven’t pulled the covers off to look, but I know it must be on there. Hopefully, it won’t cause any problems.

After planing, the sandwich went together much more tightly.

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Ocelot

666 posts in 1393 days


#4 posted 02-08-2012 10:37 AM

Here’s the “open-face” version, which shows how the arms and spacers go in.

The top of the rack is at the bottom of this photo.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

666 posts in 1393 days


#5 posted 02-08-2012 11:01 AM

Ignoring for a moment the nails, the load on each arm will be transfered directly to the spacer on which it rests, and down through the stack of arms and spacers directly to the top edge of one of the 2×12s in the base. It should be a very sturdy arrangement.

The “T” of the base with the tree is another area that needs to be strong to resist the force of uneven loading of the rack (for example if everything is loaded on one side). I don’t leave this to the bolts alone. One of the vertical 2×6s is sandwiched between the 2 2×12s of the base, and both sides of the vertical 2×6 are blocked by blocks of 2×12 nailed in place to form a socket. The bolts actually then don’t have much load at all, since the verical load rests on the top edge of the 2×12 and the torsional load is resisted by the blocks.

This photo shows the bottom of the base with the vertical tree inserted in the “socket”. This was taken before it was nailed. The socket is actually a bit tighter than this. The tree can only be inserted/removed by hammering it. This prevents the slop in the bolt holes from affecting the squareness of the “T”.

View DIYaholic's profile (online now)

DIYaholic

14698 posts in 1429 days


#6 posted 02-08-2012 01:54 PM

Oh My, What a nice rack you have! Lol.

Looks like it could hold a tank. Much more impressive that my little rack

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

666 posts in 1393 days


#7 posted 02-08-2012 05:11 PM

DIYaholic,

Yours looks quite functional. Where did you buy the pipe?

I like your rack. The guy I bought the lumber from had a rack of the same general type as yours. That’s the kind I was going to build originally, until I let my imagination run away.

My shop has a lot of windows, and as a consequence, not very much wall space. I wanted a free-standing rack.

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DIYaholic

14698 posts in 1429 days


#8 posted 02-08-2012 05:22 PM

The pipe is 1/2” black pipe available in any hardware/home improvement store. I however, got all the pipe for FREE from my old job! The 4” x 4” posts were also FREE from the same source as the pipe! I only had to pay for a some hardware and support brackets.

I know what you mean by letting your “imagination run away”. I always get paralized during the design phase of any project. Trying to anticipate and design for ANY & ALL contingencies, leaves mind spinning sometimes!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

666 posts in 1393 days


#9 posted 02-08-2012 06:28 PM

The design phase is what I enjoy the most – except, of course, for seeing what you imagined in your mind become reality! I’m not one for building things from plans. There’s nothing wrong with that, and I might learn a lot by doing that, but it’s not the way I like to do it.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11561 posts in 1445 days


#10 posted 02-08-2012 11:44 PM

That is a really solid looking rack that you are building that should serve well forever and look nice while it’s doing it. You have blueberries? I may come visit as I LOVE BLUEBERRIES. I eat frozen blueberries and heavy cream every night before I go to bed. My best friend gives me 25 gallons every year for my birthday. They grow a lot of the really big one where he lives in Arkansas.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View HamS's profile

HamS

1228 posts in 1143 days


#11 posted 02-08-2012 11:52 PM

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/59883
I posted the above in Stumpy’s Tubafore contest. This is a very flexible way to store lumber. I like the cantilever approach you used, but it is always a problem to keep the cantilever rack balance and not fall over.

-- My mother named me Hamilton, I have been trying to earn my nickname ever since.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

666 posts in 1393 days


#12 posted 02-09-2012 10:28 PM

@gfadvm,

25 gallons of blueberries! Wow! Now, that’s a best friend!

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11561 posts in 1445 days


#13 posted 02-10-2012 03:28 AM

Yep, The very best!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

666 posts in 1393 days


#14 posted 10-15-2013 03:34 AM

Hi. I thought I would report that I’m still alive, and did finish that lumber rack. I’ll have to post photos of it in use when I get them sorted out.

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