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Uses for sawdust #1: I just got a thing from the tool crib on the uses for sawdust

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Blog entry by Obi posted 06-04-2008 07:08 PM 2920 reads 3 times favorited 42 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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Click the link below and save the heating costs on your shop in winter.

how to build and use a sawdust stove



42 comments so far

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2480 days


#1 posted 06-04-2008 07:17 PM

This is an interesting post. Thanks for the link, Obi.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View Russel's profile

Russel

2199 posts in 2597 days


#2 posted 06-04-2008 07:17 PM

Very interesting. They talk about a paint can in the example but don’t say alot about how much of an area it heats. It looks like it might worth investigating further. Thanks for the link.

-- Working at Woodworking http://www.VillageLaneFurniture.com

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 2895 days


#3 posted 06-04-2008 07:22 PM

Here is the entire article from Tool Crib

View tenontim's profile

tenontim

2131 posts in 2403 days


#4 posted 06-04-2008 07:31 PM

good post on this subject. the amount of sawdust that I create, I would have to use a 20 gallon can to keep up with it.

View Tony's profile

Tony

978 posts in 2688 days


#5 posted 06-04-2008 08:14 PM

Thanks for the links Obi. I have just drilled a couple of holes in the bottom of a 2 gallon paint drum and used a 2” plastic pipe.

The sawdust is from my pile created by cutting some trees into planks a few weeks ago, so not 100% dry yet, but it works. Getting it started was a small problem – when inserting the paper the sides wanted to collapse. But it was just started and burning well with no discernible smoke, but definitely some fumes.

I do not know if I would trust it inside the workshop overnight, but it certainly would be useful to keep the frost out of the greenhouse in the early spring.

Any way going to leave it to burn overnight and see what it is like in the morning – I’ll let you all know tomorrow.

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 2895 days


#6 posted 06-04-2008 08:37 PM

I think they were using a 5 gallon can, Tony.

View Tony's profile

Tony

978 posts in 2688 days


#7 posted 06-04-2008 10:35 PM

It’s been 2 1/2 hours and the 2” diameter hole is now 4” but still burning and giving heat.

I do not have a 5 gallon drum at the moment, but if this works on a small scale, then I might invest some more efforts into this.

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 2895 days


#8 posted 06-04-2008 10:40 PM

so the hole in the bottom of the can is getting bigger. Nice to get actual tests results. maybe we can come up with modifications as we go along.

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 2895 days


#9 posted 06-04-2008 11:07 PM

I was just thinking about the hole in the bottom. Maybe if you mixed up a little concrete and with the pipe in the hole pour the concrete around the pipe so not to burn the metal bottom of the can. After the concrete sets up, remove the pipe and let the concrete finish hardening overnight.

View Russel's profile

Russel

2199 posts in 2597 days


#10 posted 06-04-2008 11:19 PM

This is getting good. Thanks, Tony for the experiment. Now I’m really curious how much heat is given off, how much area could be warmed with a 2 gallon furnace? Could the fumes be the result of the sawdust not being fully dry?

Obi, I was wondering the same thing about the can; how long would it last before it burned out? Unfortunately, I don’t need heat this time of year, so I can’t really give it a try for some months.

-- Working at Woodworking http://www.VillageLaneFurniture.com

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 2895 days


#11 posted 06-04-2008 11:21 PM

Well appearantly Tony burned the bottom of the can from the 2” hole to a 4” hole. If you put 2” of concrete in the bottom, I’d bet money that it wouldn’t burn out at all.

Another thing is I buy my lacquer and thinner in a 5 gallon can, so it seems to me that it might heat a larger area for possibly longer. I don’t know, because this wasn’t my design, I just happened accross it from the folks at Toolcrib.

View Russel's profile

Russel

2199 posts in 2597 days


#12 posted 06-04-2008 11:24 PM

I didn’t realize that was the hole in the can, I thought it was the hole in the sawdust. That makes a big difference.

-- Working at Woodworking http://www.VillageLaneFurniture.com

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 2895 days


#13 posted 06-04-2008 11:25 PM

I’m checking the article again to make sure we don’t burn down the house.

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 2895 days


#14 posted 06-04-2008 11:35 PM

When the can is full, completely cover the top of the sawdust with a thin, even layer of sand or ashes. Then twist the pipe back and forth and carefully pull it out of the packed fuel. You’ll have a neat hole—which will act as a chimney—right through the mass.

This must be their idea of a lid to keep the fumes from rising right in your breathing area. Saving the lid of the can might also be another way of “keeping a lid on it”.

View Tony's profile

Tony

978 posts in 2688 days


#15 posted 06-04-2008 11:37 PM

Here are a few photos taken 3 hours after lighting

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Flash Photograph

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Hand held No Flash

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Hand held No Flash

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

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