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New Workshop #3: Slow progress...

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Blog entry by NinjaAssassin posted 11-11-2013 02:19 AM 1559 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Some progress Part 3 of New Workshop series Part 4: Some fun progress »

I’m chipping away at this, slowly but surely. I’ve got the walkway around the shop dug out and the most important part of the retaining wall is up. I’m in the process of digging out and framing in the steps and still need to lay out the gravel in the walkway. Once all of the world’s trees finish depositing every one of their leaves in my yard, I’ll clean everything up and put down the gravel. The holidays are fast approaching and my “free time” is even more limited than usual so I’m putting the digging and everything on hold until probably February (except for the gravel). Additionally, I won’t be able to get power run to the shop until Spring so I’m going to be running off an extension cord which obviously limits what I can do quite significantly. Lights and one other thing can be run at the same time (at best) and considering the time of year, that other thing will likely be a heater. I’ll post some pictures of where I’m at as soon as I take some more pictures.

On a side note, I had about an hour and a half free this afternoon and decided to move my tools out of my dilapidated shed and into the shop and have a little fun with some scrap wood. With a couple hand saws, tape measure, try square and workmate, I decided to start my first project in my knew shop (and only my second or third “real” woodworking project period) – a saw bench. I didn’t make a ton of progress but I wasn’t in a rush at all. It was really nice to take my time, not get frustrated at my mistakes and generally just enjoy the process. When I had to call it quits for the night, I was able to put my tools down and just lock up the shop. As simple as this all sounds, it’s pretty huge for me. There was no stress about putting all the tools away in the shed and house and finding some place to put the incomplete project where it won’t be in the way and the kids won’t bother it. There won’t be any lost time getting everything back out and getting set up next time. If I have 30 free minutes, I can go out to the shop and be productive rather than putting it off because it’d take about that long to set up and tear down. This is just awesome!

UPDATE: I realize I estimated a couple full days of work to get the outside finished. It appears my woodworking skills aren’t the only thing I need to improve. Apparently, digging out and moving what probably amounts to several thousands of pounds of dirt, rock and clay takes quite a bit longer than I imagined it would.

As promised, here are some pictures:

-- - Billy



7 comments so far

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

5078 posts in 2085 days


#1 posted 11-28-2013 02:53 AM

It usually takes my three times longer to get something done. First, I think about it way too long. Then finally I do it. then go back and fix what I screwed up. The results make me happier much longer than it took to finish though.

Love whatchu r doin’

-- I love Jeeps

View NinjaAssassin's profile

NinjaAssassin

629 posts in 1186 days


#2 posted 11-28-2013 02:59 AM

Thanks man. There’s no doubt I’m going about this in probably one of the most difficult ways possible, but it sure is satisfying. It’s kind of funny that your process for doing things is so similar to mine. I thought about this whole thing for a very long time, planned out all sorts of stuff. Then I rented the skid steer and went to work. Now I’m going back to fix what I screwed up lol

-- - Billy

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lysdexic

5078 posts in 2085 days


#3 posted 11-28-2013 03:12 AM

Yeah, I will share a comment. Consider putting some corrugated pipe and gravel behind that wooden retaining wall. It will last longer.

I am not saying that to conjure doubt but propose improvement.

-- I love Jeeps

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lysdexic

5078 posts in 2085 days


#4 posted 11-28-2013 03:15 AM

-- I love Jeeps

View NinjaAssassin's profile

NinjaAssassin

629 posts in 1186 days


#5 posted 11-28-2013 03:20 AM

Thanks for the suggestion and diagram. I’ll definitely incorporate that when I start this part of the project up again around February.

-- - Billy

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

5078 posts in 2085 days


#6 posted 11-28-2013 03:28 AM

I don’t know what is up with the plate in the above picture but incorporating a deadman into your scheme will also prevent caving.

-- I love Jeeps

View NinjaAssassin's profile

NinjaAssassin

629 posts in 1186 days


#7 posted 11-28-2013 03:35 AM

Yeah, I know that’s the preferred method (and one I see all the time) but that wasn’t feasible for me. From what I’ve read, burying posts is a suitable alternative commonly used when deadmen can’t be incorporated for whatever reason. Each post along the two highest walls is buried 2 feet deep and the highest point of the wall is about 3.5 feet. They’re also spaced no more than 2.5 feet apart. Again, what I’ve come across indicates this should be sufficient but if this seems wrong to you (or if you know this is factually incorrect) please don’t hold back.

-- - Billy

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