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End Grain Floor #10: 1st Scroll Work

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Blog entry by Nate Meadows posted 836 days ago 2201 reads 0 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 9: Apron-Large tiles Part 10 of End Grain Floor series Part 11: Marquetry Inlaid Sailing Ship »

Before I could glue down the apron I needed to cut out the letters of the compass and get them inlaid in the Black Oak tiles. The last time I used a scroll saw was in high school for my guitar but I recently just got an Excalibur 21 thanks to a friend at General International. Theres no better way to learn than to do so I drew up the letters that I wanted and ordered the wood I thought would look best from Cookwoods.com. At first I was going to use Claro Walnut but the blank ended up to small so then I ended up choosing a beautiful piece of Shedua.

West

South

East

Imperfect North

I resawed up the Sedua into 5/16 thick squares and glued them to 12in thick Baltic Birch Plywood.

Prepared

Resawn

Thin Cut

Glued up

I then attached copies of my drawing onto the blanks.

Redone

I started with the North and began cutting…

First Cut

Progress

Magnified Progress

Continued

I do use Bostiks Dricote on my Scrollsaw blades and I get zero burning!

Another Bostik

I used Titebond II to glue the letter in and because it was my first the kerf was much wider than I wanted.

Frustrated and Glued

Not as Bad as I Thought.

On to the East…

One to the East

A Look Toward the Future

A Look Toward the Future

It just make life Easier!

Like here

You can get the pen at Mcfeelys.com.

Fast Cap Marking Pen

I won’t bore you with more pictures of me cutting the rest out, I will just show the end result. I did get better and better the more I cut.

Placed

Again Sanded

With those letters done I could start gluing the apron down. Again I am using Bostik Vapor Lok

Starting

Moving Along

Gluing down the Border 4

Gluing Down the Border 3

Gluing Down the Border 2

The glue takes about 24 hours to cure. Since it is a moisture cure urethane it can cure much faster when there is more moisture in the air.

More to follow…

-- "With a little bit of faith, and some imagination, you can build anything!" Nate



16 comments so far

View Bearpie's profile

Bearpie

2586 posts in 1650 days


#1 posted 836 days ago

What are you planning to use for “grout”?

-- Erwin, Jacksonville, FL

View Nate Meadows's profile

Nate Meadows

1077 posts in 839 days


#2 posted 836 days ago

Erwin,

The grout is going to be granulated cork. This will allow the wood to move through each season as it desires without any fuss or obstruction.

-- "With a little bit of faith, and some imagination, you can build anything!" Nate

View William's profile

William

8977 posts in 1475 days


#3 posted 836 days ago

Very interesting.
I hope you post some more photos after the glue dries.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Nate Meadows's profile

Nate Meadows

1077 posts in 839 days


#4 posted 836 days ago

William,

I hadn’t thought about that. I will have to do that! Thanks! I will continue to Blog my progress as I go.

-- "With a little bit of faith, and some imagination, you can build anything!" Nate

View patron's profile

patron

13017 posts in 1973 days


#5 posted 836 days ago

i’ll say you are getting better
the letters came out great

what is the binder in the cork
something flexible ?

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View Nate Meadows's profile

Nate Meadows

1077 posts in 839 days


#6 posted 835 days ago

David,

I haven’t figured that all out yet. Charles Peterson says to use a water base finish. What do you think?

-- "With a little bit of faith, and some imagination, you can build anything!" Nate

View patron's profile

patron

13017 posts in 1973 days


#7 posted 835 days ago

well nate

i did some research
and have to admit
that charles peterson
seems to be at the top
of the floor game
i’m guessing the cork is mixed with a binder
and is trowled in after the wood is sanded and sealed
then wiped clean before it sets

all my floors were cut tight
and just minor voids needed to be filled

sorry i don’t really know more than this yet
and all i could find on the net
relates to tile or cement

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View Nate Meadows's profile

Nate Meadows

1077 posts in 839 days


#8 posted 835 days ago

David,

Exactly, most of the info on the net is guys who are doing it all wrong. Sand or cement will not let the wood move as it needs and wants to.

I am going to have to grout before I sand. The reason is because the sander just tears up the free ends of the tiles. The tear out is crazy. Once they are gouted the tear out will be limited.

I am finishing the floor with Waterlox, it is a tungoil with a resin infill. I really love tung oil! First, it is easy to apply and second it looks beautiful. Finally should you ever need to reapply it, you don’t have to sand down the whole floor, just clean it up and there you go. This floor is going to hold some heavy machines. I knew I was not going to go gloss, that would be a nightmare. I love Waterlox because it has the resin infill so the end grain will suck it up and then the tiles will be even stronger.

I was thinking of using the waterlox as a binder but the resin may harden the cork to much now that I think about it. The other thing I considered was watering down a titebond solution. Titebond is amazingly stretchy. I am attracted to this idea and since I have to sand the whole floor anyway, the surface would not matter. What do you think?

Have you read Charles Petersons Book? I love it! I would love to someday get a signed copy as he is the guy that really inspired me to get into the floor!

Anyway, thank you so much for looking for me. David, I am very glad I have met you!

-- "With a little bit of faith, and some imagination, you can build anything!" Nate

View William's profile

William

8977 posts in 1475 days


#9 posted 835 days ago

They make some stuff that’s made to dip things like plier handles in to give them rubber handles. This is just an idea that popped in my crazy brain. Aint saying it would work or if you’d even be able to get it in large enough container to make it economically feasable.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View William's profile

William

8977 posts in 1475 days


#10 posted 835 days ago

This is an interesting idea I came up with while searching, moldable silicone.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Nate Meadows's profile

Nate Meadows

1077 posts in 839 days


#11 posted 835 days ago

William,

I don’t think that is crazy, thanks for the idea. That is interesting and needs so consideration for sure. Definitely need to do some reading and even talk to the company. My only thought right off the top of my head is to think how well will it hold up in 80 years from now? 100? 150? Sure, I know sounds stupid cause I won’t be alive but I am the kind of guy that if I build something I want to build it to last, build it once and build it right. You know how our forefathers built there homes and barns in timber frame because they knew the next generation was going to need them, and they are still standing today. I had the pleasure to be in some of those homes when I was in DC while I was in the hospital. It was amazing.

Anyway, I am rabbit trailing. I wonder if the polyurethane would dry out and then crack? Good questions for the sales rep:).

Thanks for the thoughts, seriously! I am so glad I joined LJ. You guys are awesome! (But I still love flickr to, for my flickr friends out there)

-- "With a little bit of faith, and some imagination, you can build anything!" Nate

View William's profile

William

8977 posts in 1475 days


#12 posted 835 days ago

I completely understand the need for longevity. This sounds like a discussion I have with various people all too regularly. I get sick of today’s throw away attitude that a lot of people have. My viewpoint actually is, if it’s worth building, it’s worth overbuilding.
That’s why I thought of silicone though.
My first thought was rubber. My experience with rubber though is shrinkage over time. When I seen the ad while searching for silicone, I started thinking of the fact that they’re now making baking pans and such from silicone. If that material is capable of standing up to the heat of a 350 degree oven, if you could get similar quliaty material, surely it might be capable of holding up as grout material.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View patron's profile

patron

13017 posts in 1973 days


#13 posted 835 days ago

i have worked with silicone
we instal windshield on ships with it
it is great as glue too

but sands bad
all rubbery
and it is messy

i too thought of it
but for the above reasons
chucked it

all the teak decks we did
we used thiokol
the black stuff
(chris craft uses some white stuff
that could be tinted)
and the tubes for a caulking gun
can be got empty
and filled as neded
to lay in a good bead
without smearing it around
with a putty knife
and filling the grain with it

why i think sealing good is important first
the thiokol dries up but never hardens
and sands well

some research

http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?133860-Silicone-vs-polysulfide-based-caulking-for-teak-decks

http://www.goodoldboat.org/reader_services/articles/sealant.php

this one below has the best advise and supplies

http://www.detcomarine.com/dcaulkappl.htm

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View William's profile

William

8977 posts in 1475 days


#14 posted 835 days ago

I’m wondering if regular grout material, if mixed with enough of that cork substance you’re planning on using, would have enough give to allow for wood movement.
It’s just a thought.
I’m thinking that it’s time, before you get completely ready for it, to start doing some testing with different compounds. That way it can have time to dry and you can see what’s flexible, what’s not, and what is just pure crap. I’ve been searching off and on all night and haven’t found an answer such as anyone else doing this.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Nate Meadows's profile

Nate Meadows

1077 posts in 839 days


#15 posted 835 days ago

William,

Thank you very much for your efforts! I am tending to agree with you that I am going to have to set some sort of test up. Its not the sort of thing to just go barreling into, not with all those hours of work into it:). I think I will make up a mock up board and go from there. It will take me some time to get there. I am very attracted to the cork idea, mainly because Charles Peterson, the expert who inspired me really advises it. And it does make sense, cork is very flexible. They already use it in expansion joints in construction.

I am drawn to the idea of watering down Titebond. The cork will stick to each other and the tile and there is little worry of it crumpling all over the floor. However, I really need to look into what David is suggesting as well, I just saw his post.

-- "With a little bit of faith, and some imagination, you can build anything!" Nate

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