LumberJocks

Chip Carving a Plate #4: Carving the Rosette

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by MyChipCarving posted 1032 days ago 3341 reads 2 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Knife Preparation - Sharpening! Part 4 of Chip Carving a Plate series Part 5: Carving the Border »

The pattern is on your plate and your knife is sharp. That means it’s time to start carving!
We’ll begin with the rosette. Have one or two practice boards ready so you can try some of these chips on your practice board before carving on your plate.

Here’s the lesson:

Next lesson: Carving the border

-- Marty, https://www.MyChipCarving.com, 866-444-6996



12 comments so far

View Panthro's profile

Panthro

19 posts in 1222 days


#1 posted 1031 days ago

Good video Marty. You make it look so easy. I will be doing a couple of these rosettes on a practice board. Should be a lot of fun though.

Good luck everyone.

-- Bob

View MyChipCarving's profile

MyChipCarving

463 posts in 1723 days


#2 posted 1031 days ago

You make it look so easy.

It will get easier and easier for you with practice. Also, look closely at my hand when I’m removing the large chips. You’ll see it shake a bit on a couple of cuts. Those biggies are not easy! :-)

-- Marty, https://www.MyChipCarving.com, 866-444-6996

View rich2008's profile

rich2008

23 posts in 1238 days


#3 posted 1027 days ago

Marty:

I transferred the pattern to one of my 3/8 inch practice boards. I then proceeded to carve the rosette, cutting a small triangular “starter” chip out of the middle first. I just could not get the knife to draw through it, and get the depth and remove the chip. I used my new wood handle cutting knife, and even bent the blade on the tip, and had to grind it down. The knife is properly sharpened; it cuts all the rest of the chips just fine. I know my practice board is a bit dry, so I even sprayed it with a 50/50 mix of alcohol and water, and soaked it. Still no luck! I got another board and went through the same thing again. I wanted to make sure I completed the whole rosette before jumping onto my plate, and ruining that too! So, I think I will just draw a 12 point rosette, and let it go as that. I don’t know what else to do. Do you sell just the replacement blades for the new knives?

Rich

-- Rich, Mississippi Gulf Coast

View MyChipCarving's profile

MyChipCarving

463 posts in 1723 days


#4 posted 1027 days ago

Hey Rich, yes, those large chips in the center are challenging. Why don’t you go ahead and divide each chip into two or three chips to make them smaller and easier to remove. That should give you the confidence to remove them on your plate.
I’ll stand behind the My Chip Carving Knife you have. Send it to me and I’ll send you a replacement!
51654 164th St.
Garden City, MN 56034

Keep chippin’!

-- Marty, https://www.MyChipCarving.com, 866-444-6996

View rich2008's profile

rich2008

23 posts in 1238 days


#5 posted 1027 days ago

Thanks for an offer like that Marty! I’ll get it in the mail tomorrow. I sure appreciate this. As you said, I’ll try and divide the large chips into smaller segements, and see how that goes.

Thanks again;
Rich

-- Rich, Mississippi Gulf Coast

View rrdesigns's profile

rrdesigns

491 posts in 1784 days


#6 posted 1020 days ago

Finally dedicated some time to try these techniques. First attempt was pretty rough. Definitely not the clean lines and “click” of your chips, but after revisiting your techniques video on your website, things improved. Thanks for the tip about locking your thumb against the knife. I was providing a good example of what not to do ( thumb as pivot instead of sliding tripod). That makes all the difference in the world in the cleanness of the cuts. Eliminating my death grip on the knife helped too. :) Practice continues…

-- Beth, Oklahoma, Rambling Road Designs

View rrdesigns's profile

rrdesigns

491 posts in 1784 days


#7 posted 1020 days ago

Progress report (or lack thereof). The density of the plate is very different from the density of the practice boards, hence my first foray into cutting the rosette ended poorly. I had too steep an angle going in so the sides of the first rosette did not meet cleanly at a single point like they did during my practice runs. Looks like I get a whole plate to practice on now. Chalk it up to the learning curve. At least I have a better understanding of the required angles now. (The remaining seven chips in the center rosette came out well. I don’t suppose there is any way to save or transform the one oddball?)

-- Beth, Oklahoma, Rambling Road Designs

View MyChipCarving's profile

MyChipCarving

463 posts in 1723 days


#8 posted 1019 days ago

Chalk it up to the learning curve. At least I have a better understanding of the required angles now. (The remaining seven chips in the center rosette came out well. I don’t suppose there is any way to save or transform the one oddball?)

Hey Beth,
Your learning curve will lessen with each chip. You’re approaching it correctly – practice board and then your project. As far as the one “oddball chip”, I’d just leave it and not attempt to make any more cuts on it. When your plate is done others probably won’t even notice it.

-- Marty, https://www.MyChipCarving.com, 866-444-6996

View ifonly's profile

ifonly

3 posts in 1292 days


#9 posted 744 days ago

could you please tell me what kind of wood that is please

View MyChipCarving's profile

MyChipCarving

463 posts in 1723 days


#10 posted 744 days ago

Hello ifonly,

could you please tell me what kind of wood that is please

I’m carving on a basswood plate. Northern basswood is all I supply because it is the highest quality. Contact me or check out my store for basswood and items to carve.

-- Marty, https://www.MyChipCarving.com, 866-444-6996

View ifonly's profile

ifonly

3 posts in 1292 days


#11 posted 744 days ago

hello marty
i wondered because it looks very white, and lot softer, i can only get a wood called lime wood over here in uk, but its a lot darker and seems harder to cut than yours, maybe it seems harder as i`m only just starting to learn, i don`t seem to be able to find basswood over here. i`l just have to keep practising.
thank you for your quick answer.
allen

View MyChipCarving's profile

MyChipCarving

463 posts in 1723 days


#12 posted 744 days ago

wood called lime wood over here in uk

I believe that limewood and basswood are in the same family of trees. Although I’ve never carved limewood, I’ve seen some marvelous carvings from this species. let me know if you have any other questions as you start learning how to chip carve.

-- Marty, https://www.MyChipCarving.com, 866-444-6996

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase