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Chip Carving Class - Quilt Squares #7: Lesson 3: Pattern Development, Part 2

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Blog entry by MyChipCarving posted 03-13-2011 05:48 PM 7332 reads 1 time favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 6: Lesson 3: Pattern Development Part 7 of Chip Carving Class - Quilt Squares series Part 8: Lesson 4: Pattern Transfer »

I know that drawing and working on patterns is not enjoyable for many chip carvers.
With that in mind, we will start carving tomorrow.

I’d still like to encourage many of you to give pattern development a try.
I’ll provide some patterns for you to carve. Adding your patterns to the mix will give our finished project more variety. Also, there’s a great sense of satisfaction knowing that the pattern you are carving is one that you came up with on your own.

Here’s an example of one pattern that I’ll provide you and what I did to make it chip carveable.
The grape basket quilt pattern is one that I’ve seen quite a few times.
I started with that pattern, sized it to fit our small square (3.25×3.25” carving area), and then divided it into smaller three-corner chips (triangles). The dots indicate the very bottom of the chip.

Below are a four quilt squares to help you get started. You can adapt and divide the shapes to see what you come up with. When developing a pattern for the large square (5.25×5.25 carving area) you can use four quilt squares in the space to make the size of the chips more manageable.

Marty Leenhouts
https://www.mychipcarving.com Chip Carving
866-444-6996

-- Marty, https://www.MyChipCarving.com, 866-444-6996



13 comments so far

View woundedthumb's profile

woundedthumb

6 posts in 1386 days


#1 posted 03-13-2011 07:08 PM

that helps alot, sometime ago I got a copy of George Bains CELTIC ART< The Method of Construction 1951,1973. I’d like to try to include s psrt of the page attached, if I would not be jumping into to deep water. This book is great I got it when I started teaching (subbing) and used it and an Escher book a great deal.
Thanks again for everything
lew

-- lew (woundedthumb) Pennsylvania, http://woodworkerwoundedthumb.com

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

16043 posts in 1618 days


#2 posted 03-14-2011 06:15 PM

Marty, I did this one a while ago. Will this work ok?

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View MyChipCarving's profile

MyChipCarving

477 posts in 1876 days


#3 posted 03-14-2011 06:20 PM

Yes! That pattern will work fine. Good job getting this pattern ready to go!

-- Marty, https://www.MyChipCarving.com, 866-444-6996

View Cubie's profile

Cubie

16 posts in 1388 days


#4 posted 03-15-2011 12:28 AM

Marty,

Here is my first attempt at a pattern. Only the left quarter is finished, I will repeat the pattern in the other three quarters. I’m not sure how this will look carved out so I’ll probably carve a test quarter on a practice board first to see if I like it.

-- Cubie

View Merrill's profile

Merrill

9 posts in 1391 days


#5 posted 03-15-2011 01:07 AM

Has anyone used “tessellations” as a source for patterns? A Google of the word will given you all you ever wanted to know about the math concept. Here is a example—Is something like this workable for chip carving?

-- Merrill, Cody, Wyoming

View MyChipCarving's profile

MyChipCarving

477 posts in 1876 days


#6 posted 03-15-2011 01:56 AM

Cubie, good pattern development and good idea to practice first on another board before carving the ‘real McCoy’. I like what I see!

-- Marty, https://www.MyChipCarving.com, 866-444-6996

View philphoto's profile

philphoto

16 posts in 1808 days


#7 posted 03-16-2011 04:27 PM

Marty:
I must be blind or ?? I can’t seem to find the grid size you are working with. I work with graph paper or Corel Draw and I need the grid size to make sure the math is working, and also to have the right size chip. I think. Am I missing something?
Phil

View MyChipCarving's profile

MyChipCarving

477 posts in 1876 days


#8 posted 03-16-2011 04:45 PM

Hi Phil,
Start with a 4mm grid when you are first starting out.
I’ll demonstrate this in the next lesson, due out any day now.
4mm is a nice size to begin with.

The patterns you see in this lesson are larger than 4mm. I’ll be providing these patterns for you so there’s no need to draw them yourself.

-- Marty, https://www.MyChipCarving.com, 866-444-6996

View philphoto's profile

philphoto

16 posts in 1808 days


#9 posted 03-17-2011 01:32 AM

Thanks, I thought 4mm was the grid size but some of the patterns I was seeing above are 3 squares or more and that is what confused me. Some of the chips in the sample quilt squares are much bigger than 4mm. I actually went to 5mm and that was easier for me.

Glad to know you are providing the patterns.
Phil

View Merrill's profile

Merrill

9 posts in 1391 days


#10 posted 03-20-2011 04:39 PM

Here is my first attempt at a pattern. Just squares inside squares.

-- Merrill, Cody, Wyoming

View MyChipCarving's profile

MyChipCarving

477 posts in 1876 days


#11 posted 03-20-2011 08:51 PM

That pattern will carve very nicely, Merrill!
Well done!

-- Marty, https://www.MyChipCarving.com, 866-444-6996

View Merrill's profile

Merrill

9 posts in 1391 days


#12 posted 03-22-2011 03:57 AM

I used Google Sketchup to do the drawing. Then once I get it like I want I export it to photo editing software to get the size i want. In this one I inscribed squares inside squares rotating 90 degrees each time. Then I erase what I don’t want. I worry that the triangles are too large for me to carve nicely.

-- Merrill, Cody, Wyoming

View MyChipCarving's profile

MyChipCarving

477 posts in 1876 days


#13 posted 03-22-2011 03:10 PM

I worry that the triangles are too large for me to carve nicely.

If the triangles are too large, subdivide them to make them more manageable. If dividing them in half still leaves them too big, try dividing in thirds or fourths.

-- Marty, https://www.MyChipCarving.com, 866-444-6996

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