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Opportunity #1: Opportunity

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Blog entry by MsDebbieP posted 03-03-2007 09:00 PM 793 reads 0 times favorited 19 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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Last month my brother had local Mennonites build a porch around his house and they used what I think is called rough-hewn pine. It is so beautiful.

My brother built a couple bird houses out of some leftover wood and Rick fell in love with the look and had my brother go to the workers’ sawmill and buy us some boards for the as-of-yet unknown projects ($8 Canadian/board).

Today we actually used the wood to make a garbage bin for our back door. It’s rough—just the way I like it. I will probably take some pictures of it next week.

Anyway, that was the “pre-story”. Today we get a call from my brother saying that he was at the sawmill again and they had a 13’ maple log for sale for $300 Canadian. Most of it is about 30 inches wide. My brother wants to split it with us, so we’d have 6.5’ length for $150 Canadian.

That’s a lot of table tops, I’m thinking. Is it a good deal? I have no idea. I can only assume that it is—but more than the wood it is a nice connection with my brother. Although he only lives about 15 minutes away, we really don’t see each other very often. But this woodworking has brought us together. I’ve been at his house more times in the past month than I have in the past 5 years!

Gotta love woodworking and all the opportunities that it brings.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)



19 comments so far

View Karson's profile

Karson

34889 posts in 3087 days


#1 posted 03-03-2007 09:41 PM

Debbie Go for it. Here is a calculator of wood volume from a log. You will have the sawdust factor so you might not get that amount of wood.

Sometimes these calculators are used to calculate firewood, where you are keeping all of the wood and don’t have the waste of sawblades.

But you will get 13’ wood not 6.5. You will just get half of the boards.

It needs to dry for 1 year for each inch of wood. You will also want to paint the ends of the boards with latex paint to keet the splitting to a minimum. You want to fill all of the pores on the ends of the wood. Not the surface, just the end grain.

If you want table tops you might want to request 2 1/2” thick wood, this would be coffee table size. Or one of them and the rest 4 quarter or 5 quarter.

4 quarter is 1” thick but when it dries it might be under 1”. It is usually used for 3/4” finished wood. 5 quarter is 1 1/4” thick and will usually give you 1” thick finished wood after it drys and is planed smooth.

When you stack the wood put stickers every 18” or so and put weight on top of the pile to keep twisting to a minimum.

If you are stacking it outside try to keep rain water from soaking into the pile. but you want air movement so don’t cover it all up with plastic. A piece of tin, plywood etc.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2847 days


#2 posted 03-03-2007 10:49 PM

wow—what a lot of things to think about.

this is wonderful. Thank you so much for the information.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Karson's profile

Karson

34889 posts in 3087 days


#3 posted 03-03-2007 11:03 PM

Debbie: I have some wood stored in the barn now. Holly and Popular and I have it stckered with a fan blowing on it. So it’s inside and has air movement. I have kept the fan running for at least 30 days. Somewhere I read that they say to let the wood rest for 8 hrs (no fan) per day so that the moisture will move from inside the boards to the outside. I’ve not noticed any problems with the fan being contuinous except for a couple of boards that were on the top without weight on top of them. (A shelf right above). Some small amount of cupping and a little twist. But that was on a 10” board. The 4” and 6” boards were fine.

I resawed a couple into 1/2” and then planed to 3/8” for small drawer sides. and I have had a little wood movement since planing so They might not yet be ready for fulltime use. But I’ve only dried them for 45 days not a full year.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2847 days


#4 posted 03-04-2007 01:36 AM

that’s a lot of drying…
do I have the patience to wait that long???

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Karson's profile

Karson

34889 posts in 3087 days


#5 posted 03-04-2007 03:49 AM

If you are using the boards in furniture it will be a requirement that it be stable to its environment. Or, parts that were assembled will become loose. If you are using the board as a plaque where you might try woodburning then it’s not a requirement.

As to you having the patience, ???!!!

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 3013 days


#6 posted 03-04-2007 04:23 AM

I’d be all over a piece of maple like that… as far as being able to wait for it… I guess you could use that time to plan out your project(s)

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2847 days


#7 posted 03-04-2007 01:18 PM

we’ll be chatting with my brother soon to decide if we want it or not…
I’ll probably see it and hate to cut it up!

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Karson's profile

Karson

34889 posts in 3087 days


#8 posted 03-05-2007 01:57 AM

Debbie: A year will go fast, as you are picking up the skills to tackle many different projects.

You can see if they have any dryer wood. I mean sawmills always have old scrap boards laying around. Some of them would be good pieces to start cutting your teeth (Router Bits) on.

Meanwhile the maple will be drying.

Buy it with or without your brother. It’s a good buy. brobably less than a $1.00 per Bdf. maybe $.60 depending on how much wood the log is cut up into.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2847 days


#9 posted 03-05-2007 02:13 AM

all their wood that they have for sale is freshly cut. My guess is that they save the rest for their own purposes.

We can stack the wood in our shed .. and wait… and plan… and wait.
It’s pretty exciting.
Of course I know that I would make something out of it right away – something simple just so I can say “ah – this is the opportunity that is drying”

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Karson's profile

Karson

34889 posts in 3087 days


#10 posted 03-05-2007 03:13 AM

Debbie: They might have a slab pile, if they don’t burn them. You might find some of Frank’s rustic pieces there.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2847 days


#11 posted 03-05-2007 01:28 PM

that is true – i forgot about the art!!!

When Rick and I put up the shelf to hold the wood, we sorted the “dumpster bin” as well, getting rid of some little stuff that (at this point in time) we won’t be using. BUT … many pieces came back out of the burn barrel and put into the save pile.
One piece had split in a beautiful 1/4 circle with a tiny little branch coming out of it. I said, “look at what you almost threw out”—Rick’s eyes opened wide and the next piece he picked up was the matching inverted 1/4 circle. It quickly went into the save pile.
I have no idea what they are/will be but they shouted “save me; save me; save me”

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2848 days


#12 posted 03-05-2007 06:02 PM

It sounds like a good buy for the Maple, if you can get it cut somehow. Will the mill cut it for that price? If so, it would be a great deal to jump on.

Let us know how it goes.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2847 days


#13 posted 03-05-2007 06:14 PM

they won’t cut it. My brother thinks that if we take our chainsaws to it that we’ll at least be able to transport it!

I was wondering what a sawmill might charge to cut it into slabs for us.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Karson's profile

Karson

34889 posts in 3087 days


#14 posted 03-05-2007 11:35 PM

Debbie: I guess I assumed from your original post that the sawmill was going to cut up the log for the $300. price. The price is still good though for the wood.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2847 days


#15 posted 03-06-2007 12:20 AM

I’ll have to get more information on it —I’m just assuming that it is in one piece.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

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