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Making Plane Blades #2: Etching a Logo

08-17-2015 06:32 AM by bobasaurus | 5 comments »

(Disclaimer: I take no responsibility for anything done with this information, proceed at your own risk.) I like to etch my logo onto plane blades using toner transfer and salt water electrolysis. This technique is commonly used by knife makers to put a makers mark on their blades, and is pretty simple to do. I start by making a logo in a program called Inkscape. This makes a “vector” image that can be scaled to whatever size I want without becoming blurry. I then invert ...

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View bobasaurus's profile

Making Plane Blades #1: Fabrication and Heat Treatment

07-06-2015 10:40 PM by bobasaurus | 14 comments »

For the “Shop Made Tool Swap - 2015: Hand Planes and Spokeshaves”, I decided to make two planes (one to keep, one to swap) including the blades. I started with a 1/8” thick 2.5” wide precision ground flat bar of A2 tool steel that I happened to have on hand. After some requests for more information, I decided to start this tutorial blog for making them. You can buy tool steel pretty cheap from Enco: O1: http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRAR?PMSECT=0000000793A2: ht...

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View Gianni's profile

I'm building an Army #2: Cutting (and cutting, and cutting and...)

01-02-2015 02:30 AM by Gianni | 0 comments »

So the first piece I wanted to cut was the knight. This was the piece about which I was most unsure of the design, so I thought I’d give it my best and abort early if it turned out poorly. A few mistakes I learned right quick: 1. Cutting the notch in the base is no job for the scrollsaw, at least with me behind the wheel. Blade flex and alignment in wood this thick just makes lining up the grooves from side to side nearly impossible. 2. Blade speed and feed rate. I normally scroll...

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View grfrazee's profile

Plane Restorations #1: Stanley No. 45 Boxes Reproduction Graphics

10-09-2012 01:57 AM by grfrazee | 7 comments »

I bought a No. 45, but the cutters did not come with the boxes that were included at the original purchase, all those decades ago. Not wanting to spend a large amount of money for real boxes, I’ve opted to make my own reproductions. However, I wanted them to be as close to the original versions as possible. The astute reader will note that the No. 45 cutter boxes had graphics on them displaying the contents of each box. These tend to get destroyed over time and are very rare to be...

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View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

My Journey As A Scroll Saw Pattern Designer #313: My New Excalibur EX21 Scroll Saw!

04-18-2011 02:03 PM by Sheila Landry (scrollgirl) | 17 comments »

After several months of waiting and anticipation, the moment finally arrived when I got a chance to really get to know and work on my new Excalibur scroll saw! Even though I had the saw delivered to the show in Saratoga Springs, there was little time for me to enjoy it and really run it through the paces. I was very busy at the show and I must say that I was only at the booth a couple of hours a day, during which time I was usually talking to people who stopped by. Both Keith and I were ...

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View shipwright's profile

Shipyard Memories #1: The Smaug Blog: Wood Boatbuilding 101, A Trip to the Sawmill

11-12-2010 08:56 AM by shipwright | 15 comments »

To those of you who have requested more photos and explanations of my boatbuilding days, thank you for sending me into my stacks of old photos and allowing me the enjoyment of remembering a youth spent doing what I loved and creating just really cool stuff. My days building wooden boats, from age 22 to 55, are all magical memories to me from the aromatic smell of yellow cedar coming out of the planer to the amazing geometrical shapes of bent frames to the sheer mass of some of the timbers we ...

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View WheelsAF's profile

Super Glide Recycled Roubo Workbench #4: Wagon Vise w/ drawer glides

05-14-2012 01:28 AM by WheelsAF | 4 comments »

Here is my wagon vise. It is pretty standard in that I used a Lee-Nielsen vise screw. The innovative part is using 8” full-extension drawer glides to ensure smooth travel. Here is an over all look from the bottom of the bench with the chop not yet installed. You can see I used some spacers between the chop and the drawer glide; I did this in the hope that I can keep some of the debris from interferring with the glide mechanism. You can see that I set up the wagon vise opening in...

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View Andy Panko's profile

Building My Roubo Bench #4: Building the Wagon Vise

02-03-2012 05:16 AM by Andy Panko | 9 comments »

I decided to put a wagon vise in my bench. I considered a traditional L-shaped tail vise, and also a twin screw end vise. But I really like the simplicity of a wagon vise. Furthermore, since I’m limited on shop space to the tail end of where my bench will be, I thought a wagon vise would consume the least amount of real estate off of the tail. And finally, a wagon vise seemed like it would be a really cool project to build! I hadn’t planned out the exact dimensions of the v...

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View CartersWhittling's profile

Tap and Screw Jig Tutorial #2: Starting the Tap

01-18-2012 06:27 AM by CartersWhittling | 33 comments »

Hello. I have finally put out the second installment of the tutorial. I had to break up the video into two sections in order to fit it onto youtube. In this part I begin work on the tap by making the guide block my friend Chris Legendre designed. The lumber you want to use for the guide should be a hardwood at least 2” thick. Depending on the size of screw you will be making the block can be 3” – 6” wide. It only needs to be surface on one face and one edge. Then...

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View Brit's profile

Saw Talk #9: Making a Saw Vise

03-18-2012 05:16 PM by Brit | 49 comments »

When I did my research, I found a number of good saw vise designs on the web. Some were simple, whilst others were more complex. The fundamental requirement of a saw vise is that it clamps a saw securely while you sharpen it, everything else is just icing. So it can be as simple as sandwiching the saw plate between two pieces of wood in a vise on your bench. Last December, I had the privilege of attending a saw sharpening class with Paul Sellers at Penrhyn Castle in North Wales. At the beginn...

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