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Milling Lumber (grudgingly) #1: What would you do?

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Blog entry by MoshupTrail posted 09-01-2011 12:12 PM 1761 reads 1 time favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Milling Lumber (grudgingly) series Part 2: Inventory »

It is interesting that the storm knocked over almost exclusively the red oaks. I lost 6-10 large (60-80 yr old) trees, 18-24” in diameter. So the question is, what do you do with vast quantities of red oak? It’s not the most popular wood, but it has some good qualities. These are just a few of the trees I lost. It’s a mess in there.

-- Some problems are best solved with an optimistic approach. Optimism shines a light on alternatives that are otherwise not visible.



14 comments so far

View HalDougherty's profile

HalDougherty

1820 posts in 1983 days


#1 posted 09-01-2011 01:13 PM

Be careful with the hangups. I use a winch to pull them down before I ever take a saw to them. Also be very careful of the root ball. When you cut the log free, the root ball can/will fall back in the hole and the end of the stump shoot up with great force.

-- Hal, Tennessee http://www.first285.com

View MoshupTrail's profile

MoshupTrail

299 posts in 1226 days


#2 posted 09-01-2011 01:55 PM

Thanks for the advice. I’ve never cut off a “fresh” root ball. Frankly, I probably won’t attempt this myself.

-- Some problems are best solved with an optimistic approach. Optimism shines a light on alternatives that are otherwise not visible.

View gpastor's profile

gpastor

165 posts in 1804 days


#3 posted 09-01-2011 02:01 PM

Looks like a big bunch of unfinished furniture to me!!!

This is what I did…step by step From tree to lasting memory

http://lumberjocks.com/gpastor/blog/24342
http://lumberjocks.com/gpastor/blog/24355
http://lumberjocks.com/gpastor/blog/24364
http://lumberjocks.com/gpastor/blog/24427
http://lumberjocks.com/gpastor/blog/24452
http://lumberjocks.com/gpastor/blog/24481
http://lumberjocks.com/gpastor/blog/24518

-- Gray hair is a crown of splendor; it is attained by a righteous life. Proverbs 16:31

View gpastor's profile

gpastor

165 posts in 1804 days


#4 posted 09-01-2011 02:14 PM

Do not do this !!! http://youtu.be/agcLlKcXp40

-- Gray hair is a crown of splendor; it is attained by a righteous life. Proverbs 16:31

View SSMDad's profile

SSMDad

395 posts in 1342 days


#5 posted 09-01-2011 02:28 PM

Sounds like a good opportunity for wood to me. I still don’t understand why there is such an aversion to red oak on this board?!

-- Chris ~~Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present controls the past."

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2394 days


#6 posted 09-01-2011 03:03 PM

not a big fan of red oak, but I know many are. if it was me I’d probably go for Quarter Sawing this if you don’t care much for it to at least have some good stable stock.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

2953 posts in 1831 days


#7 posted 09-01-2011 03:28 PM

If you were not so far from Montana, I would offer to take a few of those logs off your hands, but looking
at those long straight logs, you should have some real nice wood ready for use after a lot of hard work. The
only problem is the work necessary to handle all those trees at once. Out here there are many loggers with
plenty of experience cutting trees and logs, hopefully you will have one or two out there that will be able to
help you with your problem. Thank you for sharing.

-- As ever, Gus-the 76 yr young apprentice carpenter

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

2617 posts in 1522 days


#8 posted 09-01-2011 03:45 PM

Get a hold of your local WoodMizer dealer and other portable mill dealers, ask if there is anybody local that has one of their rigs.

You can do a lot with oak, things you make with it tends to give it “countyr” look. That is not a bad thing.

-- David in Damascus, MD

View rustfever's profile

rustfever

639 posts in 2056 days


#9 posted 09-01-2011 06:37 PM

You can just call me. I will come from California with my saw, loader, and truck/trailer and just take it off your hands. I DO LOVE RED OAK.
When I get done with it. much of it will go to a local high school wood shop, thus supporting the Wood Working Dept of that school.
Ira

-- Rustfever, Central California

View MoshupTrail's profile

MoshupTrail

299 posts in 1226 days


#10 posted 09-02-2011 12:49 AM

Yes, I will need some way to cut those leaners and haul the logs out of the woods into the open. Then I’ll be looking for someone with a portable mill. I’ve been reading up on quarter sawing red oak. Seems like that’s what’s wanted most for furniture.

-- Some problems are best solved with an optimistic approach. Optimism shines a light on alternatives that are otherwise not visible.

View venicewoodworker's profile

venicewoodworker

100 posts in 1374 days


#11 posted 09-02-2011 03:45 AM

Nice problem to have. Please let me know if you need any help with the project. Would be willing to help for some red oak. Down here, that stuff is pricey.

View MoshupTrail's profile

MoshupTrail

299 posts in 1226 days


#12 posted 09-02-2011 03:55 AM

Well, when life gives you lemons, make lemonade. But this used to be a beautiful forested area with a canopy – so you felt sort of closed in and shady. Now the canopy is gone and all that’s left are the scrub trees – mostly holly. It’s very sad. I am heart broken.

-- Some problems are best solved with an optimistic approach. Optimism shines a light on alternatives that are otherwise not visible.

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3203 posts in 1421 days


#13 posted 09-02-2011 03:56 AM

I suppose it is a regional thing. I live in SW Oklahoma and it is the wood of choice here. I bought some furniture from a local store around 20 years ago and the owner told us he was the #1 seller of the oak design we bought from Keller. Of course now Keller has gone out of business because of the foreign market. It is really popular here.

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

2617 posts in 1522 days


#14 posted 09-02-2011 05:28 PM

From what I have experienced, an even mix of flat and QS is ideal. QS oak can split fairly easily if not careful where flat sawn wood will not.

In some applications, the grain patterns in flat sawn will actually look better. Either way, if the piece is of a large size, to much of the same thing may not be the best thing.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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