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Deep Thoughts - Reader Beware #8: Dead wood

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Blog entry by Sandra posted 243 days ago 1113 reads 0 times favorited 27 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 7: Sentimental Joinery - sappy over wood Part 8 of Deep Thoughts - Reader Beware series Part 9: Mere meanderings, or 'Stumpy's Trail of Tears' »

First, the caveat:

I’ve been spending a lot of time thinking about woodworking, trying to make sense of what it is that has always drawn me to it. I’m notorious for over-thinking, overanalyzing and basically spending too much energy navel-gazing. This blog is intended to get some of it out of my head. I’ll be glib, sarcastic and flippant in my other posts. Who knows how this one will turn out. It may be a train wreck, so reader beware! If navel-gazing doesn’t hold any appeal or distraction for you, move on. If you’re allergic to estrogen, move away quickly.

My own personal rules are to not to spend more than 30 minutes on any one post. I can correct a mistake if I catch it right away, but can’t go back. If I post it, I can’t edit or delete. I tend to edit things to death and have been known to delete my posts before it’s too late.

If anything resonates with you, feel free to chime in.

9:29
We’re all going to die.
It’s just as certain as we were born, pay taxes and suffer the effects of gravity.
When we hear of someone passing, the first question is “how old was he/she?” and then we proceed to compare that number to our age and do the math.
We all know it, but it makes us squirm to talk about it, and most of us don’t even want to think about it.

When is it a tragedy?
One of the LJs lost a son-in-law last month, a young man who had just become a father.
I think we’d all agree that leaving a newborn and a young wife behind is a tragedy.
My mother-in-law is 88. To her, anyone dying under the age of 90 is a tragedy. She’s scared to death that she may get “C-A”. (she can’t even say the word cancer) I guess that’s another example of how everything in life is relative.

My father is only in his sixties, but he constantly makes comments about this or that ‘outlasting’ him. Why would he buy an expensive pair of shoes, when he’ll be dead soon anyway? (his logic, not mine). I’m thinking ‘why not buy whatever the heck you want provided you’re not going to leave debt behind for someone else to carry.

A friend of mine with a serious health issue has told me that he’s ‘accepted’ death, whenever it may come.
Wow! I dont’ know if I’ll ever be there. Don’t get me wrong. I don’t think the world is going to stop turning when I’m not here to grace it with my presence, but I suspect I would arrive at the Pearly Gates with a chip on my shoulder if I don’t get to raise my children.

Of course I’m just realizing that anyone who cares to read this may start a discussion on the ‘after-life’, so I’ll make my views clear: I don’t necessarily think that God is a caucasian male with a long white beard, because that’s too similar to Santa. I do believe however, that there is a God, and I do believe that there is something for us after physical death. Even for the non-Catholics. (GASP!) I think it’s like reading a book. Each of the characters has a voice in our heads, and it’s the same way with God. He may not sound or look the same way to you, but that’s because of the filter through which we see everything.

There are those who believe the glass is half empty, those who believe the glass is half full, and those who believe that the water was poisoned in a government conspiracy involving China. Regardless, we each have a finite amount of water.

Where am I going with this? I have no idea. Of course it may have something to do with the internist who is sending me for an echocardiogram to rule out a atrial myxoma. What is that you say? It’s a benign tumour that grows in your heart. It’s not cancer, but it can block various structures causing stroke and sudden death. It also happens to secrete some weird compounds into the body causing a wide variety of symptoms.
Nobody is saying I have this, it’s just next in the list of things being ruled out in my quest to drain the Canadian medical system dry of funds. It certainly got my attention however.

So when I went and looked at the Record CL3 48” lathe that is being sold in my neighbourhood, I could have justified the purchase. It’s not going to take food off the table, it’s a good deal, solid piece of machinery, you only live once etc etc etc. But the danged thing is huge. I have no space for it. Nowhere to even hide it for a few weeks. And it’s likely more lathe than I will ever need. Not because I plan on dying anytime soon, but there are just so many other things I would like to try before I feel the need to turn table legs. And since I don’t want my husband pouring all the water out of my glass, I passed on the purchase.

Am I depressed? No. Contemplating life’s vicissitudes? You betcha. I’ve always liked that word, ‘vicissitudes’. I read it in a book once.

I think I’ll wander out into my shop and wait for something on the lumber rack to call my name. Anyone who says that wood is dead isn’t a woodworker.

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.



27 comments so far

View NormG's profile

NormG

3611 posts in 1503 days


#1 posted 243 days ago

Now, that was a lot of thinking. Hope that wood spoke to you

-- Norman

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

10774 posts in 837 days


#2 posted 243 days ago

Glad someone else thinks about it. I am in one of “those” scenarios right now. Causes one to think about it far too much.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it. - It's not ability that we often lack, but the patience to use our ability

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4357 posts in 1342 days


#3 posted 243 days ago

Trees are life. They can live longer than anything on the planet except some really old microbes that have been found. If we left them alone we’d have a filtered eco system, and different weather patterns.

Wood speaks to me in sight, smell, and feel. It moves me, inspires me and like many woodworkers makes me a miser. It fertilizes creativity. Have you seen what some LJ’s do with scraps?

The great mother blessed us with life however fragile. Make every day, every moment as meaningful as you can.

Hopin for the best for ya!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

4787 posts in 1928 days


#4 posted 243 days ago

I want to die laughing.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Sandra's profile

Sandra

3519 posts in 574 days


#5 posted 243 days ago

Amen Doc.
Monte – you and I must have the same navel-gazing schedule! Whenever I think of deleting a post that smells a bit too much like self-pity, I think, ‘dang, Monte would catch me.’

Norm – fast typist and the tendency to ramble is a dangerous thing…

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.

View Sandra's profile

Sandra

3519 posts in 574 days


#6 posted 243 days ago

Gene – I like it, think I’ll steal that line.

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4357 posts in 1342 days


#7 posted 243 days ago

Worked with a little boy for around a year and a half. Use to yell at me in play therapy….”NO TALK JUST PLAY”! I made him a deal. I’d talk less if he’d talk a little more. About a year later he came in and started asking me questions. I looked at him and yelled “NO Talk Just Play!” we laughed and I told him I’d remember his advice cause it works.

When I’m too much in my verbal analytical self, I remember his advice.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Sandra's profile

Sandra

3519 posts in 574 days


#8 posted 243 days ago

Doc, whatever might you be suggesting???? ;)

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

11229 posts in 1174 days


#9 posted 243 days ago

I haven’t really come to ponder my end….
However, I’d like it to come at the end of my day….
That way I can sleep right through it!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4357 posts in 1342 days


#10 posted 243 days ago

Slide into that other side of your brain girl! LOL! Look at what stumpy did with a few hand tools.

Goin out to-do some animal care. Later.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Bob Kassmeyer's profile

Bob Kassmeyer

73 posts in 1424 days


#11 posted 243 days ago

Sandra, I’m not much of a poster, but I’ve been reading all of the nubber posts for some time. I have seen all of the ailments that many of the membership has and can not really say what I would feel if I had any of these. I have been for ten years a born again Christian and am ready to meet the Lord anytime. I said to a coworker today while discussing doing something I considered unsafe that I didn’t care if I died from an accident but I did not want to have a disabling injury. I would have a hard time not being able to use my hands or loosing my sight. I had to stop and look up vicissitudes it is a pretty good word.

-- Bob Kassmeyer, Nebraska

View Sandra's profile

Sandra

3519 posts in 574 days


#12 posted 243 days ago

Thanks for the comment Bob.

I used to know a lot more about being sick until I fell ill. Same as I was a great parent until I had kids…

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.

View Handtooler's profile

Handtooler

1008 posts in 631 days


#13 posted 243 days ago

Thanks Sandra! I enjoyed it immensely along with other’s comments. I’ll likewise wonder some but NOT worry. And, did ya find any lint or cobwebs while gazing? LOL

-- Russell Pitner Hixson, TN 37343 bassboy40@msn.com

View eddie's profile

eddie

6277 posts in 1113 days


#14 posted 243 days ago

Sandra as we say down south here your plowing pretty deep there ,and i do relate to overanalyzing i do it all the time and its a bad thing for me as i also procrastinate often ,woodworking really help me to feel better taking something and creating some thing out of wood , its therapeutic to a point and additive but in a good way ,

get your lathe if you can afford it ,i had one and never used it ,maybe one day but right now im in a lot of learning curves in other areas of this craft and im slow enough already learning them ,

far as dieing its a given its the living part thats a chore ,i dont think on it much but i do have one rule and thats to keep it simple and one day at a time its all we got anyways and tomorrow will be here soon enough ,

-- Jesus Is Alright with me

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

4787 posts in 1928 days


#15 posted 243 days ago

Doc, Out of the mouths of babes. What a wonderful piece of advice. The world would be a much better place were his advice to be followed universally.
We all must grow older….where is it a rule that we must grow up?

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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