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Greene & Greene Magazine Rack - my "own" design #5: Stock prep done and joinery started

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Blog entry by Mike_D_S posted 05-29-2016 03:21 PM 1440 reads 0 times favorited 2 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Stock choice and starting prep - discovered Peruvian Alder Part 5 of Greene & Greene Magazine Rack - my "own" design series Part 6: Joinery 90% done and a quick dry fit to get a quick look »

So I spent most of yersterday morning jointing, planing and cutting. All the stock is now to the correct size. The Peruvian Alder has a pleasant smell when cutting. It’s fairly easy to work. The biggest challenge was the planing as the ribbons have a tendency to tear out a bit and on the ends of the board, the tear out actually ends up being a chunk torn out. Though this was typically limited to the last 1/4 of the board which I’m going to cut off anyway.

So after a couple of hours I had a nice pile of jointed and thicknessed stock to use.

Overall the stock prep went smoothly. After planing, I cut everything to width on the saw with the fence and then cut to length using my sled and an offset block on my fence. The only exceptions being the top center pieces and the shelves. Instead of cutting them to final size, I planed and jointed these pieces and then went forward with the glue up instead to form the larger panels. then I’ll cut the panels to final size. Often I leave this step until later in a build and I always seem to end up with some flat time as I have to wait for the panel glue ups, or I have to clear off the saw top to make some additional cuts after cleaning up. So starting a bit earlier will let me do the final panel shaping more in line with the other cutting.

On a side note, I know I only used one set of clamps for the shelves, but I took care during the jointing. So I only needed enough clamp pressure to bring them together tightly, so they aren’t tightened enough to bow noticeable.

After getting the stock prepped, the first few things I decided to do was to work the back and side panels. Since the back panels will be screwed to a top and bottom rail and the side panels will float in a dado, these are some parts I can set aside until I get to final fitting and finishing.

I cut the shiplap in the back panel and then put a small chamfer on the edge to give it a little visual detail. the chamfer is hard to see in the pics. While it looks good up close, I’m starting to think this may be one of those details I’m the only one will know about as I think it’s going to get a bit lost in the final piece.

After doing the shiplap, I then moved to cutting the dadoes in the side panel center divider and in the top and bottom rails for the side. I did a test fit of the side panels into the center dividers and they are a little snug at the moment, but my plan is to give the side panels a very light sanding on the inside to thin the outside 3/4” of the panels on the back side by about 1/32” so the sit in the dadoes snugly but without binding.

So end of the first real day working on the piece and I’ve got my stock ready, the wide panels are glued up and I’ve got a good start on the joinery. The next step will be to switch to the legs and do the joinery work on the legs as I want to have the mortises cut first so I can size down the tenons to be a good fit.

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......



2 comments so far

View htl's profile

htl

2222 posts in 626 days


#1 posted 05-29-2016 04:40 PM

Nicely done and all the little extras will come together to make one project.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View JimYoung's profile

JimYoung

227 posts in 1053 days


#2 posted 05-30-2016 12:42 PM

Looking nice. The grain on the Alder is cool.

-- -Jim, "Society is well governed when its people obey the magistrates, and the magistrates obey the law." -- Solon

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