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Redo Blanket Box Lid

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Blog entry by MikeInPenetanguishene posted 01-22-2010 06:30 AM 1102 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

About two years ago, when I first started woodworking, I attempted a blanket box that came together with the help of a friend (thanks Dan). Unfortunately, we ended up moving and I didn’t have shop to finish the project in – and after a while it slipped into another time-zone. The construction was complete, but it’s still ‘raw’ wood with no stain/varnish/protection of any kind.

The problem is that in that two year period, the chest has been in and out of garages, basements and rooms and the top is now ‘dis-jointed’. I did a pretty good job on joining the boards, but I had a ‘frame’, kind of, of poplar with mitre joints around the lid that have since expanded, leaving a gap in the mitre. Argh!

So, now that I have a shop, I’m determined to finally finish this project the way it should’ve been done to begin with.

I’m going to put together a new top/lid for the chest. It’s all going to be one one section of 5 lengths of Poplar – forget the mitre joints – I’m just not good enough with knowing wood movement to compensate for it at this time.

I’ve got the wood, now just determining the final dimensions and how I’m going to tackle this to make it work. The wood is dressed (that’s the word, isn’t it) from HD, so I’m thinking of cutting the lengths approximate. Gluing it all together and clamping. When dry, cut to final dimension and then using a smoothing plane or scrapers (neither of which I have) to ensure that it’s all flat and smooth. At least I think that’s the route I need to follow.

I’ve got another day or so to think about it and will tackle it this weekend.

-- Mike Guilbault, Penetanguishene, Ontario



6 comments so far

View Ecocandle's profile

Ecocandle

1013 posts in 2530 days


#1 posted 01-22-2010 07:44 AM

I can’t wait to hear about your progress. I am sure it will be great.

-- Brian Meeks, http://extremelyaverage.com

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2798 days


#2 posted 01-22-2010 07:25 PM

Don’t forget to glue the boards together with the grain all running in the same direction. otherwise it will be a nightmare planing it. And you will need to plane it. A cabinet scraper will help you get the squeezed out glue off and for smoothing off tool marks from planing, but that’s about all you can expect from a scraper. Also, if you are new you might want to search lumberjocks and other websites for glue-up procedures including good clamping technique etc. I hope you will post the journey or the result. Good luck!

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View MikeInPenetanguishene's profile

MikeInPenetanguishene

57 posts in 2524 days


#3 posted 01-23-2010 08:01 PM

Thanks for the advice on the grain.

-- Mike Guilbault, Penetanguishene, Ontario

View MikeInPenetanguishene's profile

MikeInPenetanguishene

57 posts in 2524 days


#4 posted 01-23-2010 08:23 PM

Here’s the box as it sits right now, unfinished. That’s Rosie, my Shop-dog, laying in front of it. She doesn’t care if the joints don’t exactly fit. I love her for that!

Finished Blanket Box but lid needs to be redone.

and this is the problem with the mitre joints on the top.

Mitres have separated.

As I mentioned, I’m thinking of foregoing the mitre joint and just making a straight top. I have an antique moulding plane, with just a slight curve, that I’ve been dying to try out on something, so thinking of just using it on the edges to round it out a bit.

My only concern is the end-grain that will be, of course, on either end of the top. Any suggestions? Do you leave the end grain showing?

-- Mike Guilbault, Penetanguishene, Ontario

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2798 days


#5 posted 01-24-2010 12:02 AM

Hey Mike. That is a really nice chest. There are lots of ways to hold mitered corners together as I’m sure you know. One of the ways I like best is to use bowties. It really is an effective way the keep your miters tight. It’s easy enough to do. You can cut the mortises for them on the bandsaw. Then you can glue up the top frame and trace the bowtie pattern from the actual holes. If you save your layout lines when cutting the bowties they should be a tight fit. I’ve done this on some baskets which you can see on my homepage under projects. There’s some detailed photos there if you are interested. Whatever you do, good luck with your project.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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MikeInPenetanguishene

57 posts in 2524 days


#6 posted 01-24-2010 03:48 PM

Unfortunately, I really don’t know ‘lots of ways’ to hold mitred joints together. The bowtie sounds interesting though – I’ll check out your photos. Don’t have a bandsaw yet either – but go the go ahead last night to add some power tools to the shop!! yippee!! Can’t do it all at once.. but the door’s open. :)

-- Mike Guilbault, Penetanguishene, Ontario

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