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Shaker side table #2: stock preparation and joinery

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Blog entry by Mike Gager posted 11-25-2009 03:35 PM 3717 reads 2 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: planning and Sketch up drawings Part 2 of Shaker side table series no next part

First up in this project is to sort through the wood I have available and find pieces that I want to use for each part. As I mentioned in part 1 the wood im using i salvaged from a house remodeling project and its some sort of pine and some douglas fir. here is what im working with

Some of the wood is really dirty with caked on dirt and grime along with some roofing tar (these pieces were in the attic). not sure that i wanted to subject my planer and jointer to that much abuse i decided to build a jig to clean off the boards before running them through the machines.

in hindsight i think it would have been fine to run the boards through but my jointer is only 6” wide so not only did this process clean the boards it also gave me a flat surface for the planer on the wider boards.

i made the mistake of cutting some of the boards to length before running them through the planer which is a problem because my planer has a tendency to snipe pretty badly. i had to think of a way to get all the boards the same thickness so i came up with this idea. i used a hotglue gun and stuck on 2 strips of wood to the side of the piece i needed to plane, this worked like a charm. i saw this idea in a magazine somewhere



my camera batteries died after this pic was taken so i didnt get a pic of the boad coming out of the planer but here it is after the strips were removed

this piece will be the front apron and drawer front for the table. im cutting the drawer front out of the single piece to keep the grain running through the whole front. i went ahead and cut the drawer front out by cutting the piece into 5 pieces, removing the center section and glueing the remainder back together



then i figured out what boards to use for the top and got that glued up

next up i cut the legs. i used the doug fir 2×4 to make the legs and i should mention here I DO NOT like working with douglas fir! It has the tendency to splinter quite badly. i had heard this before but didnt realize just how bad it really was.

after the legs were cut i began working on the dovetails on the end of the legs



and then i did the tapers on the legs by building a simple taper jig


after that was done i began work on the dovetails on the ends of the aprons

this was done simply by standing the boards on their ends and running them along my tricked out custom router fence

Sweet huh?

next up i did the slots that will hold the tenons on the drawer slides/guides

i then turned my attention to some assembly as norm would say. i routered the joinery for the drawer and put it together. it uses sliding dovetails with some glue to hold it all together

finally im ready for a dry fit of everything so far

here is the way the drawer slides fit into the table


lastly here is the drawer fit into the table with a nearly perfect gap around its edges. im really happy with the way it turned out

Thats all for now, hope you guys like it



13 comments so far

View Mike Gager's profile

Mike Gager

615 posts in 1932 days


#1 posted 11-25-2009 03:40 PM

i tried to resize the pics but it didnt seem to work :(

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1763 posts in 2755 days


#2 posted 11-25-2009 05:31 PM

Looks good. Have you worked out a finish yet?

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1190 posts in 2224 days


#3 posted 11-25-2009 05:33 PM

Very nice! I love the continuous grain on your drawer front. Those are the kinds of details that make your work top notch. That extra effort really pays off, and I think it’s actually easier to build the apron that way. I’m not clear about why the boards had to start out the same thickness. What about using a belt sander to take the grit and grime off the boards first? I’ve only done one project from reclaimed wood, and it was a lot of extra work. I love seeing projects that start out as Sketchup drawings and end up with photos of the real thing.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

3443 posts in 1859 days


#4 posted 11-25-2009 05:46 PM

Very nice, Mike, and a really clean, neat fit. The Shakers would be proud. I have several books on Shaker furniture, and I remember seeing this piece in one of them, or a close replica. You done good. I really like making Shaker pieces. No frills, and functional with simple form. Post the finish results when you’re done.

-- " I started with nothing, and I've still got most of it left".......

View Mike Gager's profile

Mike Gager

615 posts in 1932 days


#5 posted 11-25-2009 06:03 PM

hey capt, i tried originally with the belt sander but kept gouging the wood. as far as the wood being the same thickness, i needed them all to be the same so i could use one set up for the dovetails

i havent figured out what im going to do for finish just, any ideas? i was thinking possibly just leaving it alone and putting on some clear poly

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1763 posts in 2755 days


#6 posted 11-25-2009 06:07 PM

I suggest shellac. If you want more protection on the top do a de-waxed shellac with satin poly.

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1190 posts in 2224 days


#7 posted 11-25-2009 06:37 PM

I agree with giz. It’s an authentic finish. I’d use amber though to give it an antique look. About 1-2 pound cut should do it, diluted as needed with denatured alcohol.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View Mike Gager's profile

Mike Gager

615 posts in 1932 days


#8 posted 11-25-2009 06:50 PM

ok i had actually thought about shellac as well. thought it might give it a little bit of an aged look like you mention. do they sell the dewaxed stuff at the box stores?

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13341 posts in 2338 days


#9 posted 11-25-2009 07:58 PM

The table turned it out nice.

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View Vincent Nocito's profile

Vincent Nocito

437 posts in 2029 days


#10 posted 11-25-2009 11:15 PM

Nice project. Well done.

View ProbablyLost's profile

ProbablyLost

82 posts in 2183 days


#11 posted 11-30-2009 08:47 AM

Nice work Mike, you have been busy. Did you ever decide to buy a lathe?

-- Chris

View woodchic's profile

woodchic

831 posts in 2023 days


#12 posted 01-24-2010 05:52 PM

Nice work….....thanks for the great post on it.

AKA…..........Woodchic

-- Robin Renee'

View Mike Gager's profile

Mike Gager

615 posts in 1932 days


#13 posted 02-09-2011 07:35 PM

i did end up finishing this table about a year later. one of these days ill post some pics of it. it actually turned out pretty nice

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