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TITEBOND wood glue NOTICE

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Blog entry by Midway posted 09-06-2017 12:26 PM 939 reads 0 times favorited 48 comments Add to Favorites Watch

The thing that irks me is that not 1 ea warning is posted on the product!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Titebond wood glue will DISTROY metal.

If you make a project and put something metal in it the acid in
Titebond will eat at it for years.

I built a case for a revolver and used titebond to glue all pieces
together, i put the revolver in the case and checked it one hour
later and a chemical reaction had allready started.

I called titebond and they said this will hapen and use a different glue
for this project
I will use a different glue for all projects.

I have been trying to figure out the problem of the chemical reaction
for 3 years.
One box 4’x9’x36’ (gun case) the lid waraped 3/16 at both ends, when
i glued it togather all pieces were straight and flat, the warapage happoned
when the glue was drying.
When i finally pinpointed the problem when i used a spot of titlebond on
the felt that lined the locating areas of the gun in the guncase.
Blueing was removed by glue on the felt. On another case the lid chain
had all the plating flaking off and barrel of gun was pitted from the
chemical reaction.
MY ADVISE IS TO THROW ALL TITLEBOND GLUE IN THE TRASH.

-- Midway wichita,ks.



48 comments so far

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

1480 posts in 974 days


#1 posted 09-06-2017 03:04 PM

Great info, thanks for the warning!

View DS's profile

DS

2536 posts in 2172 days


#2 posted 09-06-2017 03:36 PM

Question:
Does the Titebond need direct contact with the metal to react? Or, are there vapors that react with the metal?
If you have some kind of liner, or foam insert for your gun, will that isolate the metal and protect it?
In other words, can this issue be designed around?

Inquiring minds, (and long-time Titebond users), want to know.
I know that the wet glue reacts poorly on metal bar clamps, but, I always assumed the reaction was between the steel and the wood tannin in my project – the glue just being the medium.

BTW, what kind of wood was your project made from? (This is me suspecting that a high tannin wood may contribute to the problem – to me, Oak seems to have a worse reaction than others.)

Also, I would think that once the glue is completely cured, it would be inert to any reaction.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

2619 posts in 464 days


#3 posted 09-06-2017 03:50 PM

I get titebond on my clamps never had a problem :<))
also in cabinet shop that is all we used except for fastcap instant

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View DS's profile

DS

2536 posts in 2172 days


#4 posted 09-06-2017 03:53 PM

Glue, by itself on the clamps isn’t a problem for me either.
It’s when the board, glue and clamps all come into contact, that the glue turns black and stains the wood (reaction).
I end up taping the clamps where there might be squeeze out – works fine.

Not sure if this issue is even related to the OP’s post.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

9402 posts in 3180 days


#5 posted 09-06-2017 03:56 PM

Have built several French fit pistol boxes with TB II and have not experienced any problems. Likewise, no noticeable effect on clamps.
However, I will keep this warning in mind. Thanks.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View DS's profile

DS

2536 posts in 2172 days


#6 posted 09-06-2017 04:02 PM

The Titebond website lists the ph of TB2 at 3.0, which IS acidic. (7.0ph = neutral, 0 to 6 = acidic, 8 to 14 is alkaline)

Maybe there is something to this. I just can’t imagine a thin glue line in a board making any appreciable physical contact with the contents of the box. It would have to be vapors – and those would cure out after a time. (I would think)

More likely, IMHO, the wood itself has more acidic content than any cured glue. I don’t get it… yet.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View DS's profile

DS

2536 posts in 2172 days


#7 posted 09-06-2017 04:04 PM

From the Titebond specs: (emphasis added)

Titebond II Premium Wood Glue is not for continuous submersion or for use below the waterline. Not for structural or load bearing applications. Do not use when temperature, glue or materials are below 55°F. Due to low pH, product may cause corrosion on metal surfaces, test product before using where rusting/corrosion may be of concern. Freezing may not affect the function of the product but may cause it to thicken. Agitation should restore product to original form. Because of variances in the surfaces of treated lumber, it is a good idea to test for adhesion. For best results gluing exotic or oily woods, such as Ipe and Teak, please contact our Technical Support Team at 1-800-347-4583. Read MSDS before use. KEEP FROM FREEZING. KEEP OUT OF THE REACH OF CHILDREN.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2704 posts in 1740 days


#8 posted 09-06-2017 04:18 PM

Interesting….but if you have no squeeze out and the glue has dried will you still have the same problem. I understand if the glue is wet but if it is dry and coat of finish over it?

View socrbent's profile

socrbent

499 posts in 2021 days


#9 posted 09-06-2017 04:40 PM

This may explain a problem I have experienced when doing a glue up with Titebond on my table saw top. The glue up was laid on wax paper which was on the table saw. There was a black reaction that happened between all three where there was glue squeeze out. Took some serious steel wool work to clean the saw top. The strange part was that the problem spots were not from spills or drips of glue directly on the saw. But rather the reaction happened through the wax paper. Took me several times before I realized that I should not do this. Duh!

-- socrbent Ohio

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

484 posts in 2099 days


#10 posted 09-06-2017 05:19 PM

I’ve had numerous Titebond glue lines that were smooth and flush after I sanded and finished a project raise up in the subsequent weeks/months. I’m not sure what is causing it to expand, moisture content, humidity?? who knows. The low pH (acidic nature) of the glue combined with the poor stability after it should have cured makes me think it is time to find a new glue to use on my projects.

Ideas on the best brand or type of glue to use?

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View DS's profile

DS

2536 posts in 2172 days


#11 posted 09-06-2017 06:01 PM

Wow! It seems strange to even be having this conversation.

TB2 is my workhorse glue (no pun intended) for woodworking projects.
There are very few applications when it isn’t the ideal solution for me.

I would not be ready to abandon it for, well, for what replacement?

Surely, it means I will be conscientious about how and where I use it, but that’s about it.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Midway's profile

Midway

61 posts in 721 days


#12 posted 09-06-2017 07:19 PM

I have used this titebond on all kinds of woods and the acid in the glue will attack metal when it is wet
and the man at titelbond said the vapors would not go away after curing.
If you have questions get one of your bottles of glue and call the 800 number.
that is what i did and will be the last call to them.
ALL MY TITLEBOND HAS BEEN DESTROYED.
MIDWAY

-- Midway wichita,ks.

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

3004 posts in 3278 days


#13 posted 09-06-2017 08:29 PM

Here is an interesting article:
http://www.npl.co.uk/upload/pdf/corrosionofmetalsbywood.pdf

There is a table on page 5 showing the pH of common woods. Oak is in the 3’s. It also states on page 3 that kiln dried wood is even more acidic.

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

View DS's profile

DS

2536 posts in 2172 days


#14 posted 09-06-2017 08:37 PM

I am not a chemist, but, it sort of makes sense to match the ph level in the glue with that of the wood.

Does that make any sense? Is there a chemist in the house?

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1525 posts in 399 days


#15 posted 09-06-2017 08:52 PM

WOW … been using Titebond for years and have not seen nor heard of this. By chance do you or anyone in your household work for Gorilla Glue, Inc or Newell Office Brands the makers of Elmer’s Wood glue?

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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