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FW:Starting a new project

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Blog entry by Martina posted 12-29-2009 02:50 AM 1407 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Ok – so I finished the settee and it was great and then I had a few friends come over and as soon as they sat down it made a funny noise, and then SLAM!!! To the ground! Everyone was ok only thing damaged was my pride. So needless to say I think I will just buy a chair and leave the seating furniture to the pros… It took 5 days just to get it done. I was so happy. It was made out of MDF and Walnut.

I am now on to bigger and easier projects… :) I am building a dinning room table for my Sister, needless to say I have no idea what I am doing, but Rockler here I come and if that doesn’t work then I will go to the library and if that fails then I will go to the store take a long good look at one and duplicate! I am buying the chairs! I dont want to have a disclamier when I give them to her… HAHAHA!

We will see. I will keep yall in the loop!

Happy Holidays!!!

Just an update…
No I didn’t get pictures before it happened.

I looked at the joints, and support.

The frame was walnut, the seat base and sides were mdf, and the back was 3 thin sheets of walnut grooved together. The joints gave and the support screws striped out. All in the entire seat base gave and there was so much weight that the frame went to. I think I had too many cuts and joints. Once I get over the shock I will try again.

Another Update…
I tried to “fix” the ends by cutting the old “broken” joints. This made the “length” 3.5’ instead of 4’. I started by making a few holes in the side supports and then saturating it with wood glue and clamped it to dry, I will follow up with some kreg system pocket screws “in each joint”, and then I will reassemble the rest back together, let dry for 24 hours, test it out, and hopefully it holds, if it does then I will upholster and make the seat cushions. Then I will post! I hope to finish it this weekend, but not sure.

-- Martina, Houston, TX



9 comments so far

View nailbanger2's profile

nailbanger2

1041 posts in 2608 days


#1 posted 12-29-2009 03:04 AM

Martina, step away from the MDF!

Just kidding, there are a lot of people on here who can help you (not necessarilly me, but I will try).

-- Wish I were Norm's Nephew

View lew's profile

lew

11340 posts in 3220 days


#2 posted 12-29-2009 03:06 AM

Hey, we’ve all been there and done that!! It’s called learning!

When you build the table, go look at some at a flea market (fewer sales people to bug you). Take a camera and get some pictures of the joinery and construction techniques. Then duplicate something you like!

Remember, we don’t have failures- we have design modifications.

Lew

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View bent's profile

bent

311 posts in 3133 days


#3 posted 12-29-2009 03:22 AM

mdf and walnut? intresting material combination. did you get any pictures before the mishap?

you should be able to tell from the way your settee failed what the problem was (i.e. fastner pullout, material buckling, etc.), so that you can correct it in the future.

View ABB's profile

ABB

24 posts in 2542 days


#4 posted 12-29-2009 03:29 AM

Unfortunately, negative experiences are how we learn-at least for me! Do as suggested and figure out what went wrong but don’t give up!

-- Allen, WA

View Martina's profile

Martina

43 posts in 2689 days


#5 posted 12-29-2009 03:40 AM

No I didn’t get pictures before it happened.

I looked at the joints, and support.

The frame was walnut, the seat base and sides were mdf, and the back was 3 thin sheets of walnut grooved together. The joints gave and the support screws striped out. All in the entire seat base gave and there was so much weight that the frame went to. I think I had too many cuts and joints. Once I get over the shock I will try again.

-- Martina, Houston, TX

View Chris Wright's profile

Chris Wright

540 posts in 2946 days


#6 posted 12-29-2009 05:43 AM

Sorry to hear about the settee, seats and chairs can be tricky. Tables are pretty straightforward, most difficult thing is attaching the legs to the skirt. But don’t fret, there’s a lot of great books out there. This is one of the best reference books for woodworking (http://www.amazon.com/Encyclopedia-Furniture-Making-Ernest-Joyce/dp/0806971428/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1262057775&sr=1-1-spell), it shows you pretty much everything you’ll need to know. Another great book with a lot of projects is (http://www.amazon.com/Popular-Woodworkings-Arts-Crafts-Furniture/dp/1558708464/ref=sr_1_12?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1262057972&sr=1-12). Good luck and I I can’t wait to see your next project.

-- "At its best, life is completely unpredictable." - Christopher Walken

View rustfever's profile

rustfever

716 posts in 2775 days


#7 posted 12-29-2009 06:33 AM

I will not admit to anyone the number of failures I’ve experienced.
Try to always use good wood.
What constitutes ‘Good Wood’? Time and experience will give you those answers.

-- Rustfever, Central California

View Timber4fun's profile

Timber4fun

217 posts in 3065 days


#8 posted 12-29-2009 03:25 PM

You’ll have to get back up on that horse. We all make mistakes.

Walnut should provide for a solid frame. When in doubt, over-compensate. In other words, it is better to have too much strength than not enough.

For your joints, you may want to consider pocket hole joints along with some wood glue. All you need is a drill and pocket hole jig. Results are quick. Investment is minimal. Requires very few tools and very little work space. The pocket holes provide solid strength along with some wood glue. I think you’ll be surprised on how easy and useful this method is for completing a project. The biggest challenge is designing the project to hide the pocket holes. Anyway, I strongly recommend the Kreg pocket hole jigs. There are several to choose from. Rockler carries them, as well as just about everyone else. I have three different styles and they all work well. I use Titebond II wood glue for additional strength, but optional. That is my two cents. I use pocket hole joinery in combination with other styles of joints all the time. Works well. Tim

-- Tim from Iowa City, IA

View bigike's profile

bigike

4050 posts in 2753 days


#9 posted 02-27-2010 03:21 AM

hope to see it, u should post the pics and have us help fix it?

-- Ike, Big Daddies Woodshop, http://www.icombadaniels@yahoo.com

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