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Southwest end tables #8: Top levelled and ready for the sides.

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Blog entry by MarkTheFiddler posted 09-29-2013 01:02 AM 747 reads 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 7: Finishing the Border Part 8 of Southwest end tables series no next part

Howdy,

Not much time for woodshop lately but I have been able to put a little time in here and there.

Today was about 4 hours. Here is where I’m at.

I did some hand planning to get it in earshot range. I used a stiff metal yardstick like a scree to reveal high spots. Len – listen up please. I grabbed a card scraper and took down some of the ridges left by the planning. I know I need to keep working on the scraper edge. I ended up using the ROS after my hands got tired. 40 grit at first. Put my straightedge away. 30 grit until all the glue spots were gone.

Now I want to step back a pace. I emptied out the ROS dust collector before I started with the 30 grit. I sanded only the areas with walnut/maple. When I was done with that, I used the sanding dust to fill small gaps in the walnut/maple border. I emptied out the dust collector again then sanded the sapele/maple center portion. Again I used that dust to fill gaps in that area. In case this is getting boring – ditto for paduak/maple area.

I started that entire process over again with 150 grit. I inevitably miss a few spot the first few time through.

When I was done with that, I sanded the remaining filler spots off with 150.

NEXT step for me was to make sure the edges were squared up to the top of the table.

I turned the table top upside down and secured it to a half sled. I shaved about 1/32 of an inch off an edge. That took care of any misaligned wood and any clumps of glue squeeze out. I turned the table top one time clockwise and got a perpendicular edge straightened out. I turned another 90 degrees and set the top down right in from of my saw. Off came the sled and I used just the fence to shave the final 2 sides.

If during the course of my leveling, I had taken more wood off one side than the other, my sides would not have been square. Technically speaking, I could have planed half an inch off one end of the table top and 1/16th off the other. Heck, I could literally have one corner that is 3 inches thick and the other that is one inch thick. Turning the table top face down to the table saw and shaving 90 degrees off with make the edges perpendicular to the top again. Sorta makes sense to me.

If I had a thickness planer under the tree this year – I could save 5 hours of work!

Any how – this top is ready for the sides. Yep – she’s a movin’ along. Thanks for looking.

-- Thanks for all the lessons!



11 comments so far

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11480 posts in 1762 days


#1 posted 09-29-2013 01:10 AM

Wow, that is nice but sounded like a lot of work! You did good!

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View HillbillyShooter's profile

HillbillyShooter

4601 posts in 948 days


#2 posted 09-29-2013 01:15 AM

Looking good—really good!

-- John C. -- "Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth." George Washington

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10883 posts in 1346 days


#3 posted 09-29-2013 01:52 AM

That looks too wide for a thickness planer but you would have really enjoyed a wide/open end drum sander.

Some people take projects like yours to a cabinet shop and have them run through a wide belt sander to save hours of labor.

Looking good. Carry on.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View MarkTheFiddler's profile

MarkTheFiddler

1784 posts in 844 days


#4 posted 09-29-2013 02:30 AM

Thank you much guys!

Andy, I could have planed before glue up. I had several thicknesses. 3/4 is my thin stock. It would be easier if I could prep plane everything else to 3/4. Yer durn tootin about enjoying an open ended drum sander. Until a few minutes ago, I thought they were all closed on both sides.

I like you suggestion about visiting a cabinet shop. I’ll look into it.

-- Thanks for all the lessons!

View GrandpaLen's profile

GrandpaLen

1514 posts in 928 days


#5 posted 09-29-2013 12:55 PM

Well done Sir.

...she’s going to be a beautiful addition to your journey.

Work Safely and have Fun. – Len

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

3407 posts in 1850 days


#6 posted 09-29-2013 10:48 PM

Mark,

Stellar job on the end table…It still blows my mind as to how you get that Southwest pattern….I don’t think I could ever master that, but you have it down pat…..If this one turns out like your other one did, you’ll have a beautiful pair…....I’ll continue to keep and eye on this project, as well…..Carry on, Mark, and keep fiddling…...........!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

-- " I started with nothing, and I've still got most of it left".......

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10883 posts in 1346 days


#7 posted 09-30-2013 12:12 AM

The theory behind those drum sanders that are open on one end is great but in actuality, they will leave a groove or ‘step’ when the piece is turned around to sand the second side. That said, they do save a ton of time.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View MarkTheFiddler's profile

MarkTheFiddler

1784 posts in 844 days


#8 posted 09-30-2013 03:04 AM

Thanks for the vote of confidence Len and Rick. Always good to hear from you all.

Andy – the Step – makes sense to me. Thanks for elaborating. Both you and Len keep telling me I need a drum sander. Recently I have been thinking the same exact thing! One thing gave me pause. The only one I have seen had a garnet drum. Really? They took a super nice piece of equipment and installed a garnet drum? I’ll have to see what else is available for drum replacement.

-- Thanks for all the lessons!

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10883 posts in 1346 days


#9 posted 10-01-2013 12:19 AM

“garnet drum” What are you referring to? Garnet paper on the drum? You don’t replace the drum. You just change the paper. Or we are talking about different “drum sanders” than I am used to.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View MarkTheFiddler's profile

MarkTheFiddler

1784 posts in 844 days


#10 posted 10-01-2013 01:19 AM

Lol Andy, just showing how little I know. I thought the drums were replaceable sanding tubes that would fit over a spinning cylinder. I believe I’m a little more educated now. Ty.

-- Thanks for all the lessons!

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10883 posts in 1346 days


#11 posted 10-01-2013 01:59 AM

Mark. Keep checking CL for a used drum sander as they are REALLY proud of the new ones. I bought a new Jet 10-20 which is a POS and a used 18-36 Craftsman which is arguably my favorite tool.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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