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Cocktail table for my wife's room. #3: Diamonds and rain

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Blog entry by MarkTheFiddler posted 650 days ago 3168 reads 0 times favorited 18 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Top is being mounted Part 3 of Cocktail table for my wife's room. series Part 4: Base is built!! »

I added the diamonds to the table top.

It was a bit of a chore because of the imperfect line up of the pentagons. I spent a lot of time tweaking a few angles by half a degree and sneaking in the exact length. Instead of making a bunch of diamonds and trying to cut them perfectly, I used triangles. In retrospect, diamonds would have been a nightmare and the triangles look good. Despite my plans to use maple, I went ahead and used oak. The oak came from a drawer front that was kicked to the curb. That’s hysterical to me. The most expensive piece of wood on the whole thing is the birch plywood I’m mounting everything to. I picked it so the bottom side of the table would look decent.

Cutting triangles is pretty easy on the miter saw. In my case, the tip of the triangle had to be 36 degrees. I started with a 3 inch wide length of oak. Cut 18 degrees off the end. Rolled the board and cut another 18 degrees to get a triangle. Roll, cut, roll cut etc..

When I was cutting the triangles to length, I left the miter at 18 degrees and shaved off the base, When the length was right, It fit into half the diamond. I’d get the other side to fit, glue the whole thing up then work the entire diamond in. The glue added a little thickness so I had to urge the triangles in to place with a rubber mallet. It worked fine because the brazillian cherry and the oak could take that kind of ‘persuasion’.

I wanted to do more but I couldn’t get my table saw outside in the rain. Ah well – I’m pleased enough. The oak is about 1/32 thicker than the cherry but a good sanding will straighten that out.

-- Thanks for all the lessons!



18 comments so far

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

4695 posts in 1162 days


#1 posted 650 days ago

Very nice work Mark!

View lanwater's profile

lanwater

3070 posts in 1519 days


#2 posted 650 days ago

It’s coming along nicely.

Can’t wait to see the finale.

-- Abbas, Castro Valley, CA

View JR45's profile

JR45

538 posts in 897 days


#3 posted 650 days ago

Looking good. It will be interesting to see how the colours pop when you apply your finish.
Jim

-- It always looks better when it's finished!

View MarkTheFiddler's profile

MarkTheFiddler

1719 posts in 773 days


#4 posted 650 days ago

Hey guys, thank much!

I’m thinking that I need to sand it real well then apply some Lin seed oil. Do you sand between coats? Is ther a pretreatment before the oil? Should I use something other than the oil?

-- Thanks for all the lessons!

View GrandpaLen's profile (online now)

GrandpaLen

1438 posts in 857 days


#5 posted 649 days ago

Mark,

I made a Chess Board from Onyx and Marble a few years ago for my son and getting all the pieces squared and trued was a bit teadious.

Your pentagons and diamonds make that seem like childs play.

Kudos to the patience you must have to accomplish this extraordinary design in dimensional lumber, which would have been quite a task if made from veneers.

RE: Finish. Have you ever used tung oil as a finish?

Very nicely done, can’t wait to see the finished table. – Grandpa Len.

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

View MarkTheFiddler's profile

MarkTheFiddler

1719 posts in 773 days


#6 posted 649 days ago

Len – thank you so much for the very kind comments.

It looks like you are recommending Tung Oil. That’s exactly the kind of thing I needed to know. As of now, I plan on using tung oil.

-- Thanks for all the lessons!

View MarkTheFiddler's profile

MarkTheFiddler

1719 posts in 773 days


#7 posted 649 days ago

Change in plans:

I was planning on building a dodeahedon base for the table. As a matter of fact, I wasn’t planning to do much with the table top and the base was going to make the statement. In my minds eye, I believe I would be insulting the work I did on the top with a dodecahedron base. I’d have 2 parts of the table saying Look at me and I feel the table would be too busy.

The base will consist of legs with 2 rails connecting the perimeter legs. The First at 5 inches above the floor. The second will support the table top.

-- Thanks for all the lessons!

View MarkTheFiddler's profile

MarkTheFiddler

1719 posts in 773 days


#8 posted 649 days ago

I had to work 6 hours today which really cut into my time. At least it wasn’t raining when I got home. It went a bit faster today.

I finished up the top but the little tiny gaps in the inlay translated to big gaps in the longer pieces. Be that as it may I am pleased. I added the last pieces to the pattern the grabbed the circular saw and cut all but 2 inches of ply wood from the edges of the inlay. Then I was able to cut another inch and a quarter off with the table saw.

The next part was the outer trim (oak). I cut a corner out of the oak on the table saw and it fit rather well. The only way to see the plywood now is to look under the table.

The table top has lost a lot of it’s luster beacuse I am resanding to level out the oak diamonds to the cherry. In a few cases, I’m having to sand down a few other spots that are not level. I was getting a bit tired but I had to see if one of the tricks I learned on lumberjocks would work. I made wood putty from my sanding dust and glue. Since the dust was a combination of oak and cherry, I only filled gaps between oak and cherry. The oak to oak and cherry to cherry gaps are still there. The little bit I filled looks good. I’ll do some more tomorrow if I get a chance. I guess I have about 5 hours of work to do to finish levelling and filling the table top. Then I’ll progress the sanding to 80 grit if needed, 120, 150, 220, and finish with 320.

Since I’m going to finish with tung oil – I may consider taking it down to 500 grit. The only problem is a pack of 500 grit is $20. I don’t think I can jump from 320 to 500 so another intermediate pack is needed. That’s $40! I need a cheaper source of ROS sandpaper.

-- Thanks for all the lessons!

View GrandpaLen's profile (online now)

GrandpaLen

1438 posts in 857 days


#9 posted 648 days ago

Mark,

This Table is going to be ‘Stunning” you are really stepping up your level of expertise.

Your cost concerns of sandpaper are well known and widely accepted by most, but there is an alternative. A good quality ‘Cabinet Scraper’ will go a long way to minimize this cost.

eg. Cabinet Scraper; 2 for $18.99
@ http://www.woodcraft.com/product/2000259/569/cabinet-scrapers-set-of-2--best-value.aspx.

Very nicely executed.

Work Safely and have Fun. – Len

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

View MarkTheFiddler's profile

MarkTheFiddler

1719 posts in 773 days


#10 posted 648 days ago

Len – I can see that there is another aspect to my woodworking education. I never heard of such a thing. I will invest in a set but for a later project. I’m hoping I can find a post here on lumberjocks that will teach a dummy like me how to use them.

Your compliments mean a lot to me. Thank you sir!

-- Thanks for all the lessons!

View GrandpaLen's profile (online now)

GrandpaLen

1438 posts in 857 days


#11 posted 648 days ago

Mark,

Here are a few Links to ‘Use and Maintenance/Sharpening’ of Cabinet Scrapers a.k.a. Card Scrapers.
Bookmark them for future use.

1st a review –
http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/1690

Then use and sharpening tutorials – (these are just a few from LJs)
http://lumberjocks.com/toddc/blog/6848
http://lumberjocks.com/thewoodwhisperer/blog/22382
http://woodgears.ca/scraper/index.html

Work Safely and have Fun. – Len

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

View MarkTheFiddler's profile

MarkTheFiddler

1719 posts in 773 days


#12 posted 648 days ago

I got the table top level. I need to hit a few more gaps. The glue and sawdust method is working so well that I targetted the tiniest of gaps. I was planning on letting those pass. No need!

My time spent sanding is really greatly reduced with the rigid ROS. I predict I’ll be done with the rough sanding and filling 2 hours early. I am amazed how the top keeps looking better and better. Once I get the rest of the gaps to be just so and I finish up with the 80 grit, The beautification will begin. I can’t to what it looks like when I get it sanded to the glass like finish.

Len thank you so much! I bookmarked all the links and spent a few minutes reading the last. I really appreciate the time you spent finding them for me. I can plainly see that I will be a better carpenter once I get the swing of the scrappers.

-- Thanks for all the lessons!

View lanwater's profile

lanwater

3070 posts in 1519 days


#13 posted 648 days ago

I must admit that I have a set of scraper I never used.
I bought onsale it 2 years ago but never sharpend it for use.

I don’t know about my vision but I see some “stuff” poping out…

The pentagone in the center give the top some depth.

I am sure it will turn out fantastic.

-- Abbas, Castro Valley, CA

View MarkTheFiddler's profile

MarkTheFiddler

1719 posts in 773 days


#14 posted 648 days ago

Hiya Lanwater, I just had to run my hand across the center to see for myself. It’s as smooth as can be. Thanks for the reality check! I know it will look a lot better when I finish sanding. It’s really hard to put it away every night because I like to see the improvement for every minute of work.

-- Thanks for all the lessons!

View GrandpaLen's profile (online now)

GrandpaLen

1438 posts in 857 days


#15 posted 648 days ago

”It’s really hard to put it away every night because I like to see the improvement for every minute of work.”

...another A-Ha moment!

A woodworker with a passion for his Craft, and his crafts.

BE VERY CAREFUL!! ...you are rapidly approaching an addiction often referred to as
‘Pride in Craftsmanship’.

Welcome to the Therapy Group, we meet here every day, although meetings are not required, you will find them as addictive as your passion for Woodworking.

Work Safely and have Fun. – Grandpa Len

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

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