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DoDecaHedron Light Fixtures #3: Sanding is looking nice

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Blog entry by MarkTheFiddler posted 09-09-2012 03:18 AM 3898 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: It's actually looking OK Part 3 of DoDecaHedron Light Fixtures series no next part

I’m actually rather surprised and and rather pleased about how the dodecahedron light fixture is coming. So much so that I want to take advantage of the grain showing through. I used poplar. Unfortunately I do have a little wood filler here and there and the inside is also filled. Any advice on what type of stain. In a ddition, can you provide some advice on sealing it. What ever I use will have to stand up to a little heat given it’s purpose as a pendant light.

-- Thanks for all the lessons!



12 comments so far

View lanwater's profile

lanwater

3084 posts in 1591 days


#1 posted 09-09-2012 06:18 AM

It’s looking great Mark!

I usually seal my project with zensser seal coat sanding sealer.

I have read few books and many articles about finishing but I still don’t know much in this area (lack of practice).

There are some really knowledgeable people who know tons about finishing on this site. Hopefully they will chime in.

If not it does not hurt to ask the question in the forum.

-- Abbas, Castro Valley, CA

View GrandpaLen's profile

GrandpaLen

1519 posts in 930 days


#2 posted 09-09-2012 12:36 PM

Mark,

The framework is impressive and well done, I like it.

Not quite certain what look you are going for here. Will there be any light diffuser panels inside the framework, glass, plastic, fabric or string art?

With as many hours as you have invested in completing this project, I can appreciate your hesitation in wanting to get the finish right the first time and not have any remorse when the finish dries.

I would think the darker the finish the less conspicuous the filler would be, if it will be exposed.
An extremely diluted wash, of Ebony or a Dark Mediterainian Oak , on a piece of scrap poplar with patches of sanded filler, may help you decide what best will disguise the filler and still allow the grain on the outside to be seen.

In regards to your concern of heat buildup, there are many styles of ‘cool temp.’ fluorescent bulbs available that should fit the need here. They are available in “cool white”, “daylight” and “a warm glow”.

Work Safely and have Fun. – Len

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

View MarkTheFiddler's profile

MarkTheFiddler

1786 posts in 846 days


#3 posted 09-09-2012 02:46 PM

Thank you much Lanwater. By the way, I ultimately did go with the “Sausage” approach. It worked pretty well except I needed to use a glue with a little longer set time.

Grandpa Len – thank you for the compliments. I really appreciate your advice. I’ll try to be more clear.

In the case of this pendant light cover, I’m not going to use a light diffuser of any sort. When I saw these light covers on a telvision program – I fell in love with the look. They didn’t have diffusers.

About the heat buildup – I had an ulterior motive to my question. I wanted to use bee’s wax. Realistically, I believe any heat would ruin it. Also, I don’t believe the wax would really work on the filler.

I guess my ignorance showed through when I asked what I should seal it with. I guess I’m trying to take a shortcut here without doing a bunch of research. Now that I have confessed I’d like to reask my question.

After I stain the pendant light cover, what should I finish it off with. I want to avoid gloss.

-- Thanks for all the lessons!

View KOVA's profile

KOVA

1311 posts in 1036 days


#4 posted 09-10-2012 02:37 AM

TE QUEDÓ GENIAL MARCOS!!!!!!
UN PAR DE MANOS DE BARNÍZ AL AGUA CON UN
POCO DE TONALIZADOR Y UNA LÁMPARA DE BAJO
CONSUMO QUE NO EMITEN CALOR ;-)

-- KOVA, EL CARPINTERO DEL PUEBLO https://www.facebook.com/pages/El-Carpintero-Del-Pueblo/148976618479733

View lanwater's profile

lanwater

3084 posts in 1591 days


#5 posted 09-10-2012 05:03 AM

Glad it worked Mark.

Have you decided on the color?

I have seen one with a black stain and it look terrific. It will probably be the focal point.

-- Abbas, Castro Valley, CA

View MarkTheFiddler's profile

MarkTheFiddler

1786 posts in 846 days


#6 posted 09-10-2012 09:53 PM

Howdy Lanwater, I went with a minwax STAIN color called english chestnut to match the wood floors in my dining room. I am incredibly disappointed at the outcome. Since the outer facets are all crosscuts, the stain got sucked in like a sponge. Whatever beauty I had from all that sanding is completely gone. All the beautiful waving grain stripes are history. Yet, I feel like there were no two ways about it. I wasn’t about to start over and attempt to recut another one with no gaps.

I have a little hope that I can recover some of the beauty. I leaned, that you can’t use linseed or tung oil on a stained surface. Again, I believe that beeswax and any heat from the light source wouldn’t do well together. I did find a rub on poly product from minwax. It’s 50% to 100% more expensive than the afore mentioned but it works with stain. I hope it works well. I’ll let you all know either way.

Mi amigo Kova. Muchisimas gracias por el complimento. Compre otra cosa para el acabado. Lo siento pero voy a usar google para ayudarme con un traduccion.

¿Crees que un acabado de poliuretano será demasiado inflamable o peligroso?

Ojala que no, pero you puedo regresar el producto con facilidad si este es el caso.

-- Thanks for all the lessons!

View MarkTheFiddler's profile

MarkTheFiddler

1786 posts in 846 days


#7 posted 09-11-2012 01:30 AM

Relief! The wipe on poly has a solvent. It’s evening out some of the stain and the grain is once again revealed. I’ll keep on with it.

-- Thanks for all the lessons!

View GrandpaLen's profile

GrandpaLen

1519 posts in 930 days


#8 posted 09-11-2012 01:57 AM

Mark,

I’m a day late and a dollar short with this advice, but the next time you are dealing with unruley woods, known for blotching, such as pine, poplar, and cherry, hit it first with this;

Charles Neil’s Pre-Color Conditioner – Blotch Control

Part Number CNW-100100

avaliable here; *https://charlesneilwoodworking.3dcartstores.com/Charles-Neils-Pre-Color-Conditioner--Blotch-Control_p_47.html*

Many of the LJs have sang their praises to this product.

Hope you can get a handle on your blotching problem and everything shapes up for you.

Work Safely and have Fun. – Len

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

View KOVA's profile

KOVA

1311 posts in 1036 days


#9 posted 09-11-2012 03:22 AM

ES QUE LOS ARTESANOS LOCALES USAN ACEITE DE LINO O BARNÍZ AL AGUA O UN TONALIZADOR
A BASE DE OLEO O ACEITES NATURALES: VEO QUE NO LE DAN MUCHA IMPORTANCIA, HASTA HE VISTO
LÁMPARAS ENCERADAS Y LUSTRADAS CON UN PAÑO ;-D
RECUERDA QUE LAS NUEVAS LÁMPARAS DE BAJO CONSUMO NO PRODUCEN CALOR: O SEA QUE USES LO QUE
USES, NO SE VA A CALENTAR ;-D
SUERTE AMIGO (._.)
:

-- KOVA, EL CARPINTERO DEL PUEBLO https://www.facebook.com/pages/El-Carpintero-Del-Pueblo/148976618479733

View lanwater's profile

lanwater

3084 posts in 1591 days


#10 posted 09-11-2012 05:02 AM

You are very persistent. It will pay off.

Finishing is my nightmare.

-- Abbas, Castro Valley, CA

View MarkTheFiddler's profile

MarkTheFiddler

1786 posts in 846 days


#11 posted 09-11-2012 04:41 PM

Howdy Gents,

Grandpa Len – Thank you sir! I would add this post to my favorites but I can’t favorite my own post. That is an invaluable suggestion! There is still a lot of staining in my future. My next project will involve Oak. I’ll take it down to at least 220 grit before staining. Do you advise any pre stain treatment for that?

Kova – Otra vez te digo muchisimas gracias. Creo que digas la verdad. No voy a tener problemas con el foco. Voy a dejar este problemita y no voy a pensar lo in el futuro. No se porque tengo que complicar las cosas faciles. Si Dios me permite, no voy a morar tanto por las cosas chicas.

-- Thanks for all the lessons!

View GrandpaLen's profile

GrandpaLen

1519 posts in 930 days


#12 posted 09-11-2012 05:17 PM

Mark,

I don’t believe you will have any blotching issues with Oak and for years I have used verious stains on Oak with good results, however, I now prefer to use dye rather than stains, as stain darkens the porous grain much more than the harder grain. That is not a bad visual if that contrast is what you want, but if you are looking for a more even color/tone on your project the dyes will accomplish this better, IMHO.

Prior to your finishing phase of projects you may want to stop by Charles Neil’s site and browse thru his Tips & Techniques for ideas and what to watch out for in finishing your choice of wood on a particular project.

Awaiting with best wishes, pics of the finished product of your DoDecaHedron Light Fixture.

Work Safely and have Fun. – Grandpa Len. ;-)

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

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