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Bailey number 5 restoration #2: Disassembly

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Blog entry by MarkStewart posted 06-09-2016 02:24 PM 846 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: The Acquisition Part 2 of Bailey number 5 restoration series no next part

Disassembly of the plane was surprisingly straightforward; everything came apart readily with a single flat bit screwdriver.

Here are the photos of it all in pieces:

I noticed a few things as I opened it up.
  • lever cap – chip out of left corner, nickel coating flaking
  • frog – chip out of left corner
  • Iron and chip breaker – mild to moderate surface rust with some minor pitting
  • depth adjustment knob – slight nick in the knurled surface
  • bed – mild rust, chipping paint
  • all brass – heavily tarnished, in some cases beyond recognition as brass
  • knob and tote – both broken beyond usability

Firstly, the frog has a slight chip out of its left corner, and so does the lever cap. I’m not sure what effect this will have on function, but there was a fluffy pinch of shavings under the frog that may hove gotten there through the chip.

Second, the brass nuts that retain the knob and the tote are plain cylinders . Referring to the documentation I found for typing and dating planes, this leads me to the conclusion that this plane was built earlier rather than later within that 1902-1907 range mentioned previously.

Third, there is a raised 4 under the tote. I searched high and low for some mention of this particular feature, but I came up dry.

Another notable detail about the plane itself is that the depth knob is left-hand threaded. This is not really an important detail, but it messed with my “righty tighty” mindset for a few seconds.

So let’s inventory the damage and imperfections:

In my next post of this series I will clean and derust or polish all the metal parts. my process for this will be based on this video by woodknight on youtube.

I will then move on to constructing a new tote and knob. I’m looking for suggestions on the species I should use for these.

PS: this is the dosument I am using for dating this plane



7 comments so far

View Dwain's profile

Dwain

377 posts in 3319 days


#1 posted 06-09-2016 03:46 PM

These are always fun to follow. It look like you have a very good plane to start from. Looking forward to seeing it through. Oh, one more thing. Please, PLEASE don’t paint it maroon. I like the look of Walnut on my totes and handles. If you want to go all out, an exotic like bubinga would also be really cool. Try to use a close grained hardwood, whatever you do.

Good luck!

-- When you earnestly believe you can compensate for a lack of skill by doubling your efforts, there is no end to what you CAN'T do

View MarkStewart's profile

MarkStewart

11 posts in 182 days


#2 posted 06-09-2016 03:54 PM


Please, PLEASE don t paint it maroon.

Never in 1000 years! This is going to stay black.

Try to use a close grained hardwood, whatever you do.

Sounds like great advice! I like the bubinga suggestion.

View jwisbey's profile

jwisbey

24 posts in 1873 days


#3 posted 06-09-2016 11:41 PM

Great find. The bug has bitten you. I have used cocobolo on 3 totes and they match the original when finished very close. Lee Valley has a great pattern and plan for the totes…

https://www.leevalley.com/us/html/16j4010k.pdf

View CO_Goose's profile

CO_Goose

120 posts in 1251 days


#4 posted 06-10-2016 01:31 AM

Try this type study, it has pictures.

http://www.rexmill.com/planes101/typing/typing.htm

There are several others, but I prefer the Rexmill one with the pictures.

Also check out http://www.timetestedtools.net/ Don is on these boards alot, especially in the “handplanes of your dreams” thread, and the “show the restoration” thread. Lots of good information right on Lumberjocks!

-- Just making sawdust

View MarkStewart's profile

MarkStewart

11 posts in 182 days


#5 posted 06-10-2016 02:51 PM



Try this type study, it has pictures.

http://www.rexmill.com/planes101/typing/typing.htm

There are several others, but I prefer the Rexmill one with the pictures.

Also check out http://www.timetestedtools.net/ Don is on these boards alot, especially in the “handplanes of your dreams” thread, and the “show the restoration” thread. Lots of good information right on Lumberjocks!

- CO_Goose

Thanks for the resources!
still no mention of the raised “4” under the tote.

however, (assuming the iron is original) it seems that this plane is pre-1904 according to the cutter dating guide here

This drills down the date on this plane to between 1902 and 1904, which is very exciting!

View Don W's profile

Don W

17955 posts in 2028 days


#6 posted 06-11-2016 04:17 PM

As best as I can tell, you have a type 9, http://www.timetestedtools.net/2016/01/27/stanley-type-9/

1902-1907

The #4 is probably just a casting mark and my guess is it has no significance at all. You will see a lot of random marks like this.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View Don W's profile

Don W

17955 posts in 2028 days


#7 posted 06-11-2016 04:20 PM

I’d personally fix that tote, here is some help on that,
http://www.timetestedtools.net/2016/01/27/repairing-the-bench-plane-tote-the-dw-way/

But if you want to make a new one, try this
http://www.timetestedtools.net/2016/01/27/making-a-bench-plane-tote/

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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