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The Craftsman's Path #54: Modern Shaker Table - String Inlay and Glue Up

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Blog entry by Mark Mazzo posted 01-18-2009 05:38 AM 2418 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 53: Exposing the Jointer... Part 54 of The Craftsman's Path series Part 55: Modern Shaker Table - Completion »

I moved on to milling and installing the string inlay on the table before gluing it up and readying it for finish. Take a look at the latest post on my blog for the details. Thanks for reading!

Gluing the stringing

-- Mark, Webster New York, Visit my website at http://thecraftsmanspath.com



7 comments so far

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

2914 posts in 2649 days


#1 posted 01-19-2009 02:50 AM

Mark – your posts are always informative. I learn something almost every time!

What type of glue do you use for your inlays? I ask as I wonder about the swelling of the string as you apply it—wondering if hide glue is what would be used.

Also – with such small stinging – do you apply the glue to the string or into the inset? Either way—- what do you use to apply it?

One more—- how proud of the top is the stringing?

Thanks in advance—looking forward to the next post.

-- Like a bad penny, I keep coming back!

View motthunter's profile

motthunter

2141 posts in 2552 days


#2 posted 01-19-2009 03:09 AM

good progress…please keep us posted

-- making sawdust....

View Mark Mazzo's profile

Mark Mazzo

352 posts in 2665 days


#3 posted 01-19-2009 04:04 AM

Betsy,

I just used yellow wood glue for the stringing. I put a small amount of glue directly into the channels and then spread it a bit with a brush. I was as careful as possible, but it was definitely not a neat operation ;-) However, I knew that the stringing would be scraped/planed down to the surface so, that would take care of any squeeze-out. FYI – the stringing was about 1/16” of an inch proud of the surface before I scraped/planed it down even.

If you work quickly you can keep ahead of any swelling. Though, because of the tightness of the fit there is a bit of hydraulic pressure to deal with from the glue.

This stringing was 3/16” of an inch wide, so it was not as delicate as some. I would think that the more delicate the stringing the bigger the issue with potential swelling. Hide glue might be a good choice – though the open time for hot hide glue is not too long.

-- Mark, Webster New York, Visit my website at http://thecraftsmanspath.com

View Mark Mazzo's profile

Mark Mazzo

352 posts in 2665 days


#4 posted 01-19-2009 04:05 AM

Motthunter,

Keep a lookout for the final post of the finished product soon!

-- Mark, Webster New York, Visit my website at http://thecraftsmanspath.com

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

2914 posts in 2649 days


#5 posted 01-20-2009 04:02 AM

Thanks for the answers Mark. I’m looking forward to the next entry.

-- Like a bad penny, I keep coming back!

View baron's profile

baron

10 posts in 1315 days


#6 posted 10-31-2011 07:16 AM

why do you use string rather than thin strips of different color wood that slip into the kerf and can be planed off? Is there a reason for string other than it’s pliability?
John

-- Baron von App Wood Working

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1392 days


#7 posted 10-31-2011 07:38 AM

The strings are thin strips of contrasting wood.

Nice work you are doing there. :=)

A good video: http://woodtreks.com/making-and-applying-decorative-string-inlay-woodworking/477/

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

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