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The Craftsman's Path #53: Exposing the Jointer...

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Blog entry by Mark Mazzo posted 1921 days ago 956 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 52: Modern Shaker Table - Making the Aprons Part 53 of The Craftsman's Path series Part 54: Modern Shaker Table - String Inlay and Glue Up »

With a little bit of white chalk, I exposed my jointer today. The whole sordid tale is covered in the latest post on my blog. Thanks for reading!

Chalked edge

-- Mark, Webster New York, Visit my website at http://thecraftsmanspath.com



4 comments so far

View kiwi1969's profile

kiwi1969

609 posts in 1940 days


#1 posted 1921 days ago

Mark you either have a crappy jointer or dont know how to use one. Try pushing the stock slower, and your outfeed table looks to low if your getting snipe at the end. In 15 years in the industry i have NEVER had a board look like that. A good tool set up properly with sharp knives will be more than enough to create a clean sprung joint ready for glueing.

-- if the hand is not working it is not a pure hand

View Mark Mazzo's profile

Mark Mazzo

352 posts in 2411 days


#2 posted 1921 days ago

As for the quality of my tools and/or my ability to use them, I think I’ll let my work speak for itself.

I think if you read my blog post completely you’ll see that I stated that if you pass the work over the knives slower you will get a less pronounced effect. However, there is not any debate as to whether a jointer will leave a scalloped edge on a board (no matter how slowly you feed the stock or how finely tuned the tool is) the physics of the machine assure that this will happen, at least to some degree.

What you see revealed in the pictures revealed is almost imperceptible without the help of the chalk – so the error is very small, however real. My intent with this post was to illustrate that even with a good tool and reasonable care to pass the work over the knives there may be room for improvement in the quality of the surface.

Even with your 15 years of experience, I am wondering if you have ever rubbed a piece of white chalk over the edge of jointed Walnut. You may want to try a test yourself to see what is revealed. It may surprise you.

-- Mark, Webster New York, Visit my website at http://thecraftsmanspath.com

View kiwi1969's profile

kiwi1969

609 posts in 1940 days


#3 posted 1920 days ago

mark, My first sentence was a bit out of line, your workmanship is top notch and I certainly didn,t intend it to sound like I was taking a shot at you or your craftsmanship, which rudely I did, so I apologize for that. I guess my point was, Is it really worth concerning yourself with if it has no negative effect on the joint itself. again I apologize for any offence.

-- if the hand is not working it is not a pure hand

View Mark Mazzo's profile

Mark Mazzo

352 posts in 2411 days


#4 posted 1920 days ago

Daryl,

I appreciate you reconsidering your comment. Thanks for that.

I understand your question and it is a valid one. It is true that I could have probably glued the joint in question up and it would have held together easily with the strength of modern glue.

However, the point that I was attempting to make in the post was that it did not really feel/look to me that the joint was good enough. Something was bothering me and that’s what triggered me to see what that piece of chalk had to say.

I realize that I did not show the finished glued-up joint in the post but, I can tell you that after the hand planing of the surfaces, the fit was perfect – holding the unglued pieces together and then separating them provided that “suction” fit of a perfectly mated edge joint. The seam was invisible even before gluing. The result was well worth the 60 seconds it took me to plane the two surfaces.

-- Mark, Webster New York, Visit my website at http://thecraftsmanspath.com

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