LumberJocks

The Craftsman's Path #22: Queen Anne Side Table - Cutting tenons on the aprons

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Mark Mazzo posted 2419 days ago 1146 reads 1 time favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 21: Queen Anne Side Table - Leg mortises, knee blocks and posts Part 22 of The Craftsman's Path series Part 23: In search of a smoothing plane »

Well, after milling the stock and making a new tenoning jig for the table saw I was ready to cut the tenons on the aprons of the table. The jig was worth the effort and I was able to do a first dry fit of most the table parts. There’s more info in this post on my blog along with pictures of the new jig and the process. Take a look and thanks for reading!

Cutting Tenons

-- Mark, Webster New York, Visit my website at http://thecraftsmanspath.com



9 comments so far

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 2630 days


#1 posted 2419 days ago

That tenoning jig based on a Frank Klasz design isn’t it? Nice process that you’re going through. I recently cut very similar twin tenons on the foot board of a bed I’m currently working on. You’ve gotta love what that shoulder plane can do!

The photo of the chisel hanging over the edge made me a bit nervous – I think I would have opted to play it safe and use a chisel narrower than the width of the stock but wide enough to clean up the waste there. Wouldn’t want to hit that outside edge!

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View rikkor's profile

rikkor

11295 posts in 2508 days


#2 posted 2419 days ago

Can’t wait to see the finished product.

View Mark Mazzo's profile

Mark Mazzo

352 posts in 2546 days


#3 posted 2419 days ago

Dorje,

Thanks for the comments.

I know which Klausz jig you are referring to, but that one is a bit more elaborate (it actually has a piece at a right angle to the fence allowing the stock to also be placed there. He does have the cam clamps though. This one is actually adapted from one I saw by Bill Hylton in Popular Woodworking some time ago. It was well worth the time invested to make it.

I agree on the shoulder plane. I really like how I can clean things up for a near perfect fit with it. What a great tool!

I probably could have used a narrower chisel (that one was 3/4” – as wide as the stock). 1/2” may have been a good choice. However, my method was to pare away small slivers of the waste until I had gone across the entire area – this is in contrast to trying to take the whole bite at once which is difficult. The reason for a wider chisel than say 1/4” is that I wanted it to eventually bridge across to the two outside shoulders to give me my flat reference and to avoid any dips via a narrower chisel in between. Probably a lot of ways to do this – this is just one.

-- Mark, Webster New York, Visit my website at http://thecraftsmanspath.com

View Mark Mazzo's profile

Mark Mazzo

352 posts in 2546 days


#4 posted 2419 days ago

Rikkor,

It’s kind of exciting to finally see the table taking shape with the first dry fit of the joinery. I’m just as anxious for the finished product! Thanks.

-- Mark, Webster New York, Visit my website at http://thecraftsmanspath.com

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 2630 days


#5 posted 2419 days ago

Got it! Makes sense -

It was the cam clamp that reminded me of Klausz’ design but couldn’t remember the specifics…Bill Hylton/Pop Wood….I’ll have to check it out.

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View Mark Mazzo's profile

Mark Mazzo

352 posts in 2546 days


#6 posted 2419 days ago

Dorje,

If it helps, I think that the Bill Hylton tenoning jig may have been in Popular Woodworking in either October or November of 2004.

-- Mark, Webster New York, Visit my website at http://thecraftsmanspath.com

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 2630 days


#7 posted 2419 days ago

Thanks – I’ve always been interested in the possibility of building a jig like that. I’ve used the table saw for shoulders, band saw for cheeks method up to this point. Router on larger/longer pieces.

What do you think/feel are the advantages to this jig?

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View Mark Mazzo's profile

Mark Mazzo

352 posts in 2546 days


#8 posted 2418 days ago

Dorje,

I’ve done the table saw/band saw method tool. I’ve sometimes used the router in special cases as well.

This jig first of all gives you very clean cut tenon cheeks – I can never get them this clean on the band saw. I also feel that I can tune the size of the tenons much more precisely than on the band saw – though I still fit with the shoulder plane as I described in the post. Using the jig I feel that the stock is very controlled while cutting the tenon.

One downside is that if you are tenoning the end of a very long piece then it may be more difficult to stand it on end without obstruction, etc.

You could certainly make a very simple jig that rides over your table saw fence a do some quick tests before investing too much time in a more extensive version of the jig. Let me know the results if you try it.

-- Mark, Webster New York, Visit my website at http://thecraftsmanspath.com

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 2630 days


#9 posted 2418 days ago

Will do – Thanks for the added info Mark…I’m always afraid to get too close with the band saw, preferring to trim to fit (with the shoulder plane), but have felt that I’m probably trimming by hand more than necessary sometimes. Sneaking up even closer on the fit (off of the machine) would be nice. Sounds like this type of tenon jig does that for you…

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase