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Custom Buffet #3: Basic Cabinet construction complete

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Blog entry by MT_Stringer posted 10-09-2013 02:31 AM 1193 reads 1 time favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: A good start Part 3 of Custom Buffet series Part 4: Raised Panel Doors - UGH! »

Today, I finished leveling the cabinets and screwed them together. Then they were screwed to the wall. Nice and solid.

I still have to trim the two ends and do a little touch up painting.

Next up are drawers, doors and drawer fronts. I bought a new rail and style router bit set so this will be a new venture for me. Same goes for the dovetail construction on the drawers.

We also ordered the brick for the wall. It should be delivered in a week or so.

The cabinets will be painted and then treated with a glaze. I will post some pics soon.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas



12 comments so far

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1196 posts in 1309 days


#1 posted 10-09-2013 04:40 AM

hey Mike:
Couple of things with the cabinet doors. Square is good, Flat is ESSENTIAL. Build or buy a cope sled. Got clamps? Start thinking about hinges NOW. Buy or make a jig to locate pre drill holes for handles and/hinges. Flat or raised panels? You have an excellent start the finish line is near.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

1975 posts in 1916 days


#2 posted 10-09-2013 05:24 AM

Thank you sir. I have the hinges – Blumotion full overlay. I have already got my drill press fence set and pre-drilled a test piece to verify the cup depth an location.

For the doors and drawer fronts, I have the lumber milled to exact widths – 1 1/2 inch for the drawer fronts and 2 1/4 for the door rails and styles.

I am thinking seriously about a coping sled. I have the plans from shop notes ready to go. Building the carcases went so fast and easy, it is going to be a drag doing the rest. Test cut, test cut, test cut. :-)

Raised panels – Man that is a dangerous looking router bit. I will be extra careful with that thing. Thankfully, the Bosch 1617 can be slowed down while using the big bit.

I have an open end sander (Grizzly 18-36) to sand the doors with once I get them assembled. I already have the panels glued up and sanded flat on both sides.

It’s OK if I screw up now. Lumber is fairly cheep, so now is the time to get the work right. Hope to do the kitchen next year.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View stefang's profile

stefang

13243 posts in 2019 days


#3 posted 10-09-2013 07:36 AM

Looks good Mike, I’m sure this will be a fine looking buffet when finished. The brickwork will be nice too.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1196 posts in 1309 days


#4 posted 10-09-2013 07:07 PM

A coping sled is nearly essential. The ends gotta be square for gap free joints. I made a simple one in just a few minutes. I’ll find a pic of it.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1196 posts in 1309 days


#5 posted 10-09-2013 07:24 PM

look

Looking from the left to right; the frame, the sliding clamp with a sandpaper edge to hold the working piece, the working piece, a replaceable backup, the frame. I did end up putting in another screw on the frame piece. This entire thing went against the fence and kept the working piece square. Worked very well.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1196 posts in 1309 days


#6 posted 10-09-2013 07:36 PM

Those big bits kinda freak me out too. I might be tempted to take a little of the material with the table saw first. You said you were going to paint them; are you using Poplar? I found poplar to be very easy to work with. Our doors have been up for two years and look as good as the day I hung them.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1196 posts in 1309 days


#7 posted 10-09-2013 07:47 PM

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

1975 posts in 1916 days


#8 posted 10-09-2013 10:06 PM

Poplar? Yes sir.
Your cabinets look great.

Thanks for the pic of the sled. I think I can duplicate it.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

1975 posts in 1916 days


#9 posted 10-10-2013 03:13 AM

@Jumbojack – it only took about an hour and a half to make your sled. Thanks for your help. I will break it in tomorrow.
Mike

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1196 posts in 1309 days


#10 posted 10-10-2013 07:14 AM

Scrap pile sled. You saved $80.
The rails and stiles are pretty simple once you get the bit(s) set. Dont forget to make and keep a set up block.
Please post progress photos. I love watching builds in progress.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

1975 posts in 1916 days


#11 posted 10-12-2013 05:56 PM

Face frames have been primed. Time to tape off for the paint to be applied (that’s her project).

The sled worked well. All pieces for the doors have been milled. The dry fit looks good.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1196 posts in 1309 days


#12 posted 10-16-2013 04:28 PM

They look GREAT Mike! I made my own space balls for the panels to rest on in the groove. Wax paper and some silicone. Ran out a 3/16” bead let them cure and then cut 1/4” pieces. Put them in the groove before the panels and they wont rattle. Works great. They are cheap enough to buy them. If you can find some sort of spray rig to shoot the doors DO IT! Priming and painting the doors alone will take as long as the entire build if you go the brush and roller route. Even a cheap gravity fed spray rig will do; but then again I HATE TO PAINT.
Good luck, The project looks really fine.
Oh and kudos on the helper, aside from painting, I think masking is even worse than painting.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

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