LumberJocks

The top-secret project..... #7: The Race To The Finish Line

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Blog entry by MSlumberjocks posted 872 days ago 1542 reads 0 times favorited 51 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 6: The Wheels On The TSP....... Part 7 of The top-secret project..... series no next part

So now that KTMM has his band saw at his shop, and I (William) am left alone with mine, all that is left is for each of us to finish up the details.
I must admit, if you’eve kept up with the blog, that I am ahead of him already. So it really isn’t a fair comparison. Still the same though, I though I’d start a new blog entry for the seperate finishing. I’ll post mine here, and I hope KTMM will do the same.

I mentioned yesterday, way down at the bottom of the last entry, that I’d changed my mind a bit and worked out how I would mount my saw. After that slavedriver (KTMM) took so much out of me yesterday, I thought about not even going to the shop today. Chad though, my twenty ywo year old son, suggested this morning that if I wanted him to, he’d help me get the saw and motor on a stand. I couldn’t pass up the help while it’s here. He normally runs off on Sundays with his buddies. So off to the shop we went. I didn’t do much today, but since it seemed Chad was in a very helpful mood, and Billy (my twenty year old) finally found his way to the shop too, a lot got accomplished.

Here is the motor and saw mounted on it’s stand. The stand isn’t completely finished. The front opening you see there in the front, I’m going to mount a door there to contain the sawdust. There is a hole in the table surface for it all to fall through. I put a serperator panel between this, and another opening on the backside that is identical to this one. On the backside, I’m going to build and install a drawer to hold bandsaw accessories.

I mentioned yesterday, this cabinet is one I picked up from the garbage that someone had put on the curb. It has four inch casters. It is made out of partical board. After taking the top off and reinforcing most of it with solid wood though, I think it’ll last me a long time.

After some measuring, I cut three inches off the sides to make it all come out to a height I was comfortable with. Then I glued, brad nailed, and screwed the seperator plate in. This added extra rigidity. I was going to completely replace the top. In the end though, I decided to instead, keep the top and overlay it with a sheet of pecan, which from my experience, is the hardest and most durable wood I have in my shop currently. My only complaint with pecan is how hard that stuff is. It was a job drilling and installing screws into it.

Originally, the top was nailed on with brads. When I put it back, I used lag screws. I wanted to make sure it didn’t go nowhere. Then my sons turned it upside down on my work bench so I could install screws through that, into the pecan top, from underneath. After everything was done, the boys were playing and pushing each other around the shop on it. So yes, it is strong enough I believe.

Notice anything about these previous two photos?

You can’t see the holes in the wheels that you may have noticed if you’ve been keeping up with the build. Yes, I snapped these photos with it running under it’s own power. After getting everything lined up, built, and mounted, I decided to just turn it on and let it run a while. I allowed it to just run for about thirty minutes. I figured that if any immediate problems that needed attention were going to crop up, now would be the time to catch them. There were none.

I have to admit, another reason for letting it run so long was pride. I am proud of this one. I couldnt’ help but let it run, while I sat with a cup of coffee with a smile on my face, admiring this work of art in motion (in my opinion).

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So what was next on the list?
Yes, I know, it’s dangerous even running this without the guards made yet, but I had to test it.
KTMM and I both have cut thin wood on our saws already, even if it was unsafely done, but what kind of test is that?


Ten inch wide piece of scrap cottonwood.
No fine tuning yet. Just kiss the blade with the fence, moved it back a hiar, and locked it down.
Sliced off a, well, slice, a sixteenth of an inch thick, like a sharp knife through hot butter.

If you think I was smiling before, admiring it running, now I was grinning from ear to ear.
.

So the next task is to build the guards and covers. Then I’ll disassemble everything to apply finish. The finish line draws nearer each workable day.

.

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UPDATE 2/23/12

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My (William) saw is built. All I have left to do is tear it all back down and apply finish. Then I can reassemble it and fine tune everything.

I went with basic squared covers. I didn’t want anything fancy.

I just noticed from this photo that I do have one tiny detail to do before getting ready for finish. I never did put that tiny guard around the blade, above the upper blade guide assembly. I’ll get that done in short order. It’s no big deal.
The rear of the saw. I wasn’t planning on covering those little holes at the back of the saw. I decided in the end though, since KTMM had left me enough of this good oak ply, what the hey. I may as well do it up right.

Using the old Total Shop unit gave me a nifty little spot to hang the cord on the side of the motor unit when I’m not using it. I used a new cord and switch to wire it the way I wanted. I’ll show that in a minute.
I hope ya’ll like pictures. I took a lot. Oh, I won’t try posting them all. Don’t get too worried.

On the backside of the stand I put a drawer to hold any bandsaw accessories, like extra blades and such.
I started to cut the bolt off along the backside of the motor unit. Then I realized it made an excellent drawer stop. When you pull the drawer all the way out, that bolt keeps it from falling out unless you purposely pick up on the front of the drawer and angle it out.

On the front side of the frame, on the side of the partitiion where the sawdust will fall, I wired a switch behind a locking door. This way, I can lock the saw up so that noone will be able to mess with it without my keys.

So there you go guys.
My next post on the build will be place in the projects section.
I hope you all have enjoyed it as much as me.
Stay tuned anyway though. KTMM will still be back to impress us with how much better he’ll do his, I’m sure.
For now though, unless something happens (like the shop burning down), I’m proud as can be of my saw. It has been a lot of work. It has been well worth it though everytime I see a piece of wood pass the blade, as I’m sure it will be everytime.

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EDIT 3/9/12:
So KTMM took his bandsaw home. I went to visit his shop and he had had about zero shop time, so he hadn’t had time to work on his. That bothered me to no end. I wanted to see it done so badly. So from that point forward, I dropped every hint I could for him to allow me to finish it until he finally agreed. He still wants to do his covers and such, but he agreed to allow me to get it to a point so he could at least use it to cut his covers. So that is what I’ve been privately working on.
Since I now had the experience from finishing my own, I think in some ways I done a better job on his than I done my own.





Here it is!
I won’t say it is the safest thing in the world at this point, but with care, KTMM can cut his covers on it.
His table is larger than mine. That is something he said he wanted. After seeing it though, I want a bigger table as well.
His got two coats of poly, while I only done one on mine.

KTMM and I had been talking about all the different opinions each of us had heard concerning which was better, bearing guides, or blocks. So he brought me some blood wood to make the blocks out of. This stuff is HARD. Anyway, he and I both now have bearing guides and blocks. I made two complete sets of guides so we can easily switch them out depending on what we find we like best.

This is a half horse motor that SuperD brought me to replace my lathe motor that is on it’s last leg. Luckily I hadn’t mounted it yet.
KTMM has the two horse powerplant that will eventually power the bandsaw at his place getting it cleaned up and ready to run.
I clamped this half horse to it just for a test run. I did not have the correct size belt and didn’t see a point in rushing out to buy one for a test run. So I substituted trotline string. I wasn’t sure, but figured it was worth a shot. The string worked for a test. It ran for about five minutes until the string got loose. I’m assuming from heat. Then it started slipping too bad on the motor pulley to do much good.
The testing was a success though. It is now ready for KTMM to use. All he has to do is mount the saw and motor in place and go.

As a sidenote, I told KTMM that I would gladly help him for nothing. He said he didn’t feel right with me doing all this for nothing. So he generously brought me a full set of Marples chisels. I’m talking about the older ones that were made in Sheffield England. I think they will become my chisels of choice compared to my other ones.
The set goes up to a two inch chisel. That thing is MASSIVE. I have been sharpening on it off an on all week. It is so big, that I can’t do it all at once. I’d say I have about two hours into it already getting an initial bevel on it. It is looking nice, but not quite there yet. You will all see it, and the set, in a future blog.
I just wanted to throw this in here and say, thank you very much KTMM. You didn’t have to do that, but it is much appreciated. It is the most complete set of nice chisels I’ve ever owned.



51 comments so far

View Dave's profile

Dave

11133 posts in 1424 days


#1 posted 872 days ago

All right William. Now the scrolling projects ahead of you. Cool and a great job. I am happy for you. Congrats!
I am not going to tell shop smith what you did.
~
~
~
~
They might want to build one;)

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View boxcarmarty's profile

boxcarmarty

8890 posts in 944 days


#2 posted 872 days ago

So why do I feel like a retard in a room full of bouncy balls? Oh what the he. Congratulations William…..

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

12586 posts in 1259 days


#3 posted 872 days ago

FANFREAKINTASTIC!!! CONGRATULATIONS!!!
Looking really good.

Now drop the coffee & have a cold one, a shot & a glass of champagne!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

#4 posted 872 days ago

Well, I hit a railroad tie with a table saw on this one. My motor is crap, I just knew a new capacitor would fix it. Imagine my disappointment when I replace it this evening and the motor wouldn’t spin up on its own. After a busy day with family today, I only got a couple minutes in the shop, and that got burned on the motor…. oh well, we’re not in the final inning yet…..

-- Practice does not make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect. Vince Lombardi

View William's profile

William

8840 posts in 1426 days


#5 posted 872 days ago

KTMM, how hard would it be to run a single 220 line in your shop?
I still have that one horse 220 motor.

Also, I still haven’t been able to get anyone to tell me for sure how or if it can be rewired for 110. I was told by someone that any 220 motor could be converted, but I don’t know how.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Dave's profile

Dave

11133 posts in 1424 days


#6 posted 872 days ago

I will look for another motor KTMM.
I am still going to tell shopsmith.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View boxcarmarty's profile

boxcarmarty

8890 posts in 944 days


#7 posted 872 days ago

William I have done it before and can tell you how I did it. I don’t know if all motors can be changed.

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

View Dave's profile

Dave

11133 posts in 1424 days


#8 posted 872 days ago

Call Tesla….

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

#9 posted 872 days ago

Most motors under 1.5 horses can be rewired 120 or 220. I think that motor is 220 only from what I can tell. I can likely wire up 220 on an outlet if I have to, but I think ill just use the other motor I have and see how far I can go with it.

-- Practice does not make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect. Vince Lombardi

View William's profile

William

8840 posts in 1426 days


#10 posted 872 days ago

The words that Marty refers to in post #2 of this blog entry has been edited out.
I just got an email from someone. I’m not sure of they are a Lumberjock or not, but the point of their email was heard loud and clear.
I wish to offer my deepest apologies to anyone I may have offended with that statement. I am sorry.

I am an old country boy. Sometimes, my sayings may not be exactly politically correct, for lack of a better word. I don’t mean any offence by any of it. If, at any time, I type something that offends anyone, please let me know, either publicly or privately. I am man enough to accept criticism and will delete any offensive words and offer my apologies.

Again, I am sorry if I offended any of you.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View William's profile

William

8840 posts in 1426 days


#11 posted 872 days ago

KTMM, if you can come up with the wire, my shop breaker box has three 220 breakers that are not being used. So that will cut some of the expense out. If you decide to go that route, let me know and I’ll get things moved back so I can get to the box and take one out for you before your next trip.

I can reach the breaker box now, but I won’t do things such as remove breakers while reaching over things, so some of the stuff (lawn mower, tiller, and such) would need to be moved.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View William's profile

William

8840 posts in 1426 days


#12 posted 872 days ago

Super, youo go right ahead and tell Shopsmith.
That is actually a Total Shop, which was ripped off from Shopsmith already. So I don’t recon they’d mind.

Actually, I aquired the Total Shop system in a trade. I really had no need for it. It sat in my shop for ages collecting dust.
I then thought I wanted a drill press. So I had the boys help me set it up as that. It didn’t work out to well because for some operations, you had to move the motor up or down on the way tubes. It was just too heavy for me to even attempt. So it seldom got used.
Then I wound up removing the motor head from the frame. I sometimes used the disk sander on it, but the frame took too much floor space for just a disk sander. Then I caught a sale and bought the Ridgid oscillating belt/spindle combo sander. I haven’t touched the disk sander since.

So, I tried to sell the Total Shop. I even tried giving it away a few times. Noone wanted it around here. Now though, I’m kind of glad I hung onto it. It’s a great motor for my saw.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View William's profile

William

8840 posts in 1426 days


#13 posted 872 days ago

I will check tomorrow KTMM.
I thought that 220 motor was a one horse.
My son just told me it’s a two horse.

The offer still stands though. If you need the motor and a breaker, it’s all yours.
A two horse motor on it woul turn a beast into a complete monster.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View boxcarmarty's profile

boxcarmarty

8890 posts in 944 days


#14 posted 872 days ago

See if this makes sense

.....

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

View William's profile

William

8840 posts in 1426 days


#15 posted 872 days ago

Marty, thanks for the offer, but I don’t get into rewiring motors and such. My brother, when I can get him around without some other agenda, knows how to do such things.
When I mentioned it to him though, he completely ignored me and started figuring out how he wanted to run a 220 plug to wherever I wanted it in the shop. His deaf ears to what I wanted missed the part I told him about me wanting portability.
This motor is the one I wanted on my saw until I started considering how I wanted mine portable around my shop. With the size of KTMM’s shop though, if he doesn’t mind running a 220 line, I think it’d be perfect for his saw.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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