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The top-secret project..... #4: The Parts Department

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Blog entry by MSlumberjocks posted 01-18-2012 04:16 AM 1590 reads 0 times favorited 23 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: William goes to glue up....... Part 4 of The top-secret project..... series Part 5: The Assembly Line »

Ok, the cat is fighting to get out of the bag, because after this post, everyone should know what we’re building. So I guess our top secret project will be only a bottom secret project, or no secret at all. Anyway, although it’s been rough the last few weeks for me, I’ve gotten some work done in the parts department. While this project has a very well thought out design, some of the parts are headscratchers. I am learning a few new techniques on this project.
So here we go.

After some glueup and cutting, here are the upper and lower wheelblocks.

This next part was made on a day that I was hurting so bad I really didn’t have any business in the shop. That’s never stopped me before though. It took all day to make. The 11.5 cm piece for the bottom has a lip on it. I cut that piece four times before I got it good enough that I was happy with it. I thought I was happy anyway. Then I went home for the evening. I woke up in the middle of the night and walked over to the shop and set the upper wheelblock frame on the body frame. Something was bothering me, and the view you see above proved my suspisions. Something was off on the measurements.
So I brought the piece back home with me, along with a tape measure, to figure out how in the world, with all me checking and re-checking, did I mess it up.
It came down to this. There are notches that are 1.5 cm wide and 2.5 cm deep cut into the 3.2 cm sides where the top and bottom meet it. The sides are 3.2 cm deep and 4 cm wide. The plans did not give you the measurement for the cutout, only that it was 1.5 cm deep. So I had to subtract 1.5 cm from the width. Well, somehow I got confused and subtracted it from 3.2 instead of 4 cm and came up with 0.7 cm. This threw everything off.
Does that make sense? I threw all those numbers out there to show how easily it was to get confused with it. Since making this mistake, I have came up with a method on these types of parts on this project. Before making a cut now, I draw it out with an ink pen on the wood. to make sure I don’t get confused.
However, that didn’t help with this part. I thought about trying to cut it apart and redo. Since this will have plenty of tension on it though, I felt it was best to just throw these in the firewood pile and start over on them.

While the glue up was drying on the new upper wheelblock frames, I cut the L-brackets that they’ll slide into.


Dinasours roamed the earth the last time I done a spline joint, so I had no way of cutting them. I once had a fancy jig I’d built for a saw that has long since left my shop, but it is as gone as the saw. So I glued up a quick and dirty jig to cut the splines in the upper wheelblock frames. It worked well enough that I saved this jig. It isn’t as fancy as the one I used to have, but it got the job done.
As for the splines, their drying at this very moment for me to trim up tomorrow. The plans call for splines on these joints for strength.
Splines.
What can I say about the splines?
It’s been a long time and my memory isn’t that great. I don’t know if I done something wrong or if splines are just simply the messiest one techniques a woodworker could ever have to do.
The splines are an alternate method in the plans. The ideal way to make the frames is finger joints. I have no way of making finger joints that thin or deep though. So I went with this method.

Remember we’re building two of these. So here are the two trunnion support beams. In the front is the front top side of one of them. In the rear is the back bottom side of the other. I snapped this photo to show the cutout areas in it.
The front has a cutout for the blade guide that I cutout by setting the depth on the table saw and running it back and forth across the blade. Then I finished up the angle of the cut on my band saw.
The top leading edge has a forty five degree piece ripped off to allow the tilting of the table without interference.

After that cut was made, then I had a blade’s width relief area that had to be trimmed off of each end. I just stood the piece up on it’s angled side and set up my miter gauge to trim this off of each end. This is to provide clearance for the trunnions.


On the back side, there is an area that has to go to make clearance for the bottom wheel. The plans give two different ways to accomplish this. You can hog it out with hand tools, or you can set up and make stopped cuts on the table saw. Since I consider myself the power tool guy (I don’t do hand tools unless I have to), you can see which method I chose.
I just set it up to make the cut to the depth I needed with my miter gauge. Then I clamped a bar clamp to my saw table to prevent the miter gauge from going any further than that. Then I kept running the piece over the blade continuously while holding it against the miter gauge until I had everything cut out that I needed.
Sooooo, that’s where we’re at now. Since I’m sure everyone knows what we’re building now, I’ll go ahead and tell you with my parting photos.
Here, arriving in the mail today, is my Woodslicer blade from Highland Woodworking:



23 comments so far

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Dave

11168 posts in 1493 days


#1 posted 01-18-2012 05:03 AM

Wow you guys have come a long way. It seems you and William have both had a few do overs. Are the wheels done? It wont be long now. And if you don’t mind help to remind me to bring that motor your direction when I come to see you, please.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

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William

9024 posts in 1495 days


#2 posted 01-18-2012 05:06 AM

My fault SuperD.
I made this post. I was suppose to put that in there. My memory has a few holes in it these days. Little bits of information just keep leaking right out.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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Dave

11168 posts in 1493 days


#3 posted 01-18-2012 05:16 AM

You know I should have know. Lucas is never this long winded;) Great progress anyway William.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

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William

9024 posts in 1495 days


#4 posted 01-18-2012 05:26 AM

Work has been keeping KTMM so busy that his free time to make the trip over is limited. I could have just pushed the project aside and waited to work on it when he’s here. However, ya’ll know that would drive me crazy. So I decided I would go on, since my health has been too spotty to really get into my normal detailed projects much, and start working on the parts I could do by myslef.
So, I am constructing most of the basic parts. Then when KTMM gets over, I’m going to sit back with a cup of joe and watch him work his magic with the handtools truing all this up.
Remember, all this has to be as precise as we possibly can get it. KTMM and I agreed, because of this, that it would be best for him to do a lot of the truing and squaring up with hand tools. Our reasoning is that with handtools, he can work on it slowly. With all the work going into this, we’d hate for me to go wild with the power tools and take too much off of something. As we all know here at Lumberjocks, it’s easy to take more off, but nigh near impossible to put it back on.
After all of his part is done, then it’ll just be a matter of assembly. After assembly, we both have different ideas on how we want to do ours covers and guards. Besides, if careful, we can use them without guards if need be. So, we’ll each be doing our own covers and guards.

As for my covers, I have a method to the madness I have in mind.
I want to set this up for one purpose, and one purpose only, resawing wide boards. I have my smaller Craftsman saw for curved and smaller work. However, I have certain visitors in my shop (my brother) who insists on messing with EVERYTHING. So, I plan on a cover that bolts on with long through bolts and nuts. This way, it’ll take more time to get into the saw for any kind of adjustments that it’ll discourage my brother from messing with it. Once I get it set up and tuned, I’d be very angry of he screwed with it.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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Dave

11168 posts in 1493 days


#5 posted 01-18-2012 05:54 AM

Epoxy William is your friend. It will stretch a board and glue your brothers feet to the floor. Its coming on along. I am headed out to the shop to smoke and put another coat of finish on my toolbox. Great job guys….

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

#6 posted 01-18-2012 06:29 AM

Well, I just spent the past hour or so, sharpening tools ( and shooting the poo) with tubmanslim. Good times, I needed a little fellowship to help ease an other wise great/crappy day. The project looks great William (that’s who posted this one). I’m itching to make another trip, but with my recent time away from home, I’m gonna have to wait.

Also, I had a bit of discussion on the MS lumberjocks cookout, day in the park or whatever you want to call it. I’ll get with everyone about it in the future.

-- Practice does not make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect. Vince Lombardi

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William

9024 posts in 1495 days


#7 posted 01-18-2012 02:59 PM

KTMM, take your time. I haven’t been doing too great. I feel like I’m running on empty the last couple of weeks. So I aint in a huge hurry. I’m just trying to get all the little nitpicking stuff out of the way. There’ no sense in wasting the valuable time we have working together on it doing the one man stuff. All of what I’m working on by myself, if we were to do together, we’d be in each other’s way so much someone would wind up getting hurt.
I’m all ears whenever you get time to catch us up on the cookout/picnik/get-together/LJfamilyBSsession.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View William's profile

William

9024 posts in 1495 days


#8 posted 01-18-2012 03:06 PM

SuperD, epoxy is some slick stuff.
No.
I’m mean literally, it is some slick stuff.
I knew a guy one time that was famous for taking shortcuts on things. He was also the type who was going to use everything. He didn’t like throwing away NOTHING. His wife moved a rug right inside their front door. It had some rot going on in the board below the rug. She told her husbands about it.
He cleaned everything up real good. He surveyed the situation. He decided that instead of replacing the spot of rotting wood with fresh wood, he could clean away the little bit of rot and use epoxy to fill it, like wood putty. So he did.
He wound up getting the epoxy looking quite rough. So he built it up higher than the existing wood over the course of a few days. Then he sanded it smooth. The he polished it. Then his wife, who was unhappy with the repair polished it. She waxed it. Nothing she did made her happy with it though and her husband was NOT going to admit it was wrong and fix it right.
So she simply covered it back up with the little rug. Hide it. Well, she tried to hide it. Everytime someone walked through the door and stepped just a tiny bit pushing forward, that rug slipped on that slick spot of epoxy and they busted their butt.

Oh, the husband exentually made a different repair. He duct taped the rug down.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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Dave

11168 posts in 1493 days


#9 posted 01-18-2012 03:42 PM

William was that your repair? Funny…

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View William's profile

William

9024 posts in 1495 days


#10 posted 01-18-2012 03:49 PM

No, I wouldn’t use epoxy to fix something like that.
I know how to throw plywood down so I can hurry up and get back to the shop. Much quicker.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View William's profile

William

9024 posts in 1495 days


#11 posted 01-18-2012 11:55 PM

Well today has not been a good one. A cold front moved in yesterday eveining, and to my understanding, there’s warm front coming in right behind it, sending our roller coaster weather right back up into the seventies. I can’t wait for spring.
Anyway, I did get a little bit done.
I went and took the clamps of of the upper wheelblock frames from gluing the splines in. I had to cut them flush and sand them up.

”Honey, I need a way to cut these carefully. This would be a good time to go get that Marples japanese pull saw I’ve been wanting so badly. They have two different ones. Which one do I need? Well I’m not sure. I can use both of them eventually. I’ve heard they’re real good saws. They cut smoothly. I’ll bet they would even be easier on my back than my old worn out Stanley.”

NOTE: The saws cut wonderfully. My back is killing me though. So I still wound up using power tools to trim the splines. I’ve been looking for a good excuse to get these though ever since SuperD told me how smoothly japanese style pull saws cut, and he was right!

So here is a photo of everything we have done so far taped and clamped into appoximate position. We have the frame, wheelblocks, upper wheelblock frames, L-brackets, and trunnion beam done.
I wanted to start on the trunnions or the guide bar today. I’m just not up to it though. Hopefully I’ll feel better tomorrow.
After I get these two pieces done, I’ll be at a stopping point until KTMM can make it back over. He’s got to do the hand tool work. He’s got to trim the frame until it’s nice, square and true. Then I’ll be able to start attaching some parts.
Also, I can’t work on the blade guides until after he comes because we’re going to change the design on those to incorporate bearings instead of hardwood blocks.
So, after all that is done, this week if my health lets me (I’m hoping it will), I think I may start on my stand and table. I would like to get that done before KTMM’s visit. I want him to see what I build. That way, if he likes mine, I can build up his stand and table identical to mine.

Hey Krunk!
I have been thinking.
Dangerous, I kow.
You need to start thinking about an emblem I can cut on the scroll saw so you can put on your covers. I think we should each have a personalized emblem to attach to these to identify them as ours. I also need to know what color your covers are going to be so I can cut in out of something that’ll contrast it, unless you want to paint yours. Either way, let me know.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

#12 posted 01-19-2012 12:16 AM

I have a box of casters for the stand(s) don’t let me forget them. I’m going to be tied up this weekend for sure, but next weekend is looking free, hopefully by then I’ll have my lee-valley order in, sharpened and ready to go.

-- Practice does not make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect. Vince Lombardi

View Dave's profile

Dave

11168 posts in 1493 days


#13 posted 01-19-2012 12:41 AM

Oh no William is hooked. Go in the house and get a candle, Rub the sides of the saws a bit and oh my god, you won’t believe it. My first 2 years cutting dovetails was done with that marples flush cut. It’s not bent and still has all the teeth.

put that on yall’s saws;)

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View William's profile

William

9024 posts in 1495 days


#14 posted 01-19-2012 12:46 AM

I don’t even own a candle SuperD. My wife wouldn’t go for me messing with her fancy smancy scented ones either. I use coleman lanterns when the lights go out. Since I don’t think coleman fuel will help then, what about Johnson’s paste wax?
Yes, I know. I use Johnson’s for EVERYTHING.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View William's profile

William

9024 posts in 1495 days


#15 posted 01-21-2012 05:00 AM



Here’s the guidebar and clamp I finished cutting today.
The second photo shows how they will be mounted to the frame. The pen area you see below the clamp on the right side of the guide bar will be against the frame. The abgle along the left of the clamp will push the bar into the frame, keeping it rigid and square.

I wound up making the clamp out of sycamore. In order to do it with red oak I would have to glue up material. I actually started making it with oak before I realized the problem with that. No matter how I glued it and cut it, it was going to make it so that the thin angled piece that pushes the guide bar against the frame would only have a tiny piece of wood that would be glued on, without anough contact surface to hold well enough for me to be comfortable with.
The sycamore was the only other wood I had in which I would be able to make this part out of solid wood, that is not glued up.
I also think we will be making a few other piece out of sycamore. I have realized that a few parts just do not lend well to glued up material and will be better with plywood or solid stock.
Some things, like the trunnions for example, I may make from sycamore and ply, then see which one will work better.

Also, I had a little adventure today while hogging out material for the clamp. You can read about that here.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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