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All Knotted Up #1: Or, RBS brings the Woodsmith a Stick

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Blog entry by Mark Wilson posted 11-16-2015 09:02 AM 948 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of All Knotted Up series Part 2: or, How Design Changes Take Place »

It’s early Sunday afternoon. Dad turned ninety on Friday. And I think it’s gonna rain.

RBS and the kid she married forty-some-odd years ago, were wandering around in a forest in Oregon, sometime in recent days of yore, and, the woman sees a fallen tree branch on the ground of about five to six inch’s girth and four to five feet long, and tells the fella, “Hey, maybe LB can use that.” Being the obedient manchild he is, the fella carries it all the way to their car, where it stayed (I know not how long) til it came into my possession yesterday. Yellow Pine, I think, it is. Cracked, I KNOW, it is. Dry as a bone, and looking for all the world like something that would, one day, become a fence post, albeit a short one.

This morning, while the kids were off to somewhere in their Sunday-Go-To-Meetin;-Clothes, the voice in my head says to me, he says, Woodsmith, make something with that, that they may have something to take with them when they bug out on Tuesday.
I cut, with my handsaw, a length of about ten inches. I milled it on my table saw-cum sawmill, into a rectangular blank. I mounted it ‘tween centers, and was well on my way to having something like a cylindrical, cracked blank, when I hear in my head, Didn’t you leave out step two?

A brief explanation: I saw, a few days ago, one of my Buddies, turning a Celtic Knot sphere. And, it was lovely. And, I think I can do that. Or, leastwise, the voice in my head seems to be convinced. That’s what I’m aiming at. So, anyone knows that cylindrifying the blank is step three. Step two, after milling the rectangle, is, of necessity, cutting kerfs and installing the wafers that make up the Knot. Step three is turning a cylinder. That, somewhat cylindrical, blank is now in a box, and I milled another blank.


_
Now they go together well enough. Then, because I had two separate pieces with forty-five-degree chamfers and a wafer to sandwich betwixt them, I need a way to clamp it in a straight line. Being very proud of my accomplishment, I set about watching glue dry. I went in the house and made myself a Dagwood, brought it with me to the Dungeon and began going through my fan mail. That done, I removed the clamps. All the clamps, that is, except the one I’d neglected using. That would be the one that would have smashed the whole shebang down, aligning the bottom face, which I couldn’t see. You remember the popular heavy-metal band, KISS. Picture the S’S in their logo. That’s what it looked like. Sort of a lightning bolt. “Not a problem,” says the Voice. And he was right. I re-milled it into a rectangle (the Sphere in my head is as small as I care to have it, now), and determined that, henceforth, I would behave differently. This means putting the confounded miter saw back in its unholy cage. I set up the miter gauge on the table saw with a stop for making a kerf a little wider than the blade. I made the, nice straight, kerf, inserted and glued the second wafer, and began watching glue dry. This involved cleaning up the grill (because RBS wants to use it), and writing this. Tuesday approaches, forthwith and post-haste.

Well, sir, my miter saw sucks. It’s likely because I have a twelve-inch blade on it that flexes. The stinkin’ thing can’t cut a straight line to save its life. Also, I made the cut too deep and the kerf became a through-cut while I was trying to insert the Ficus Wafer. (A note about the kerfs in these Things: You can leave quite a bit of lumber at the bottom of the kerf – when you turn the rectangle into a cylinder, you’re going to go right through the floor of the kerf. Different words: A rectangle [squre-in-profile] loses a lot of meat on its way to becoming a circle – the floor of the kerf is only left in order to make the glue-up easier by keeping the two halves of the blank aligned.) Not to be dissuaded by the whacky cut, I set up the disc sander on the Shopsmith and tried really hard to make them sandwich that Wafer in an acceptable fashion. That not working, I recut both sides on the table saw. That’s better.

TBC

-- Mark



8 comments so far

View lew's profile

lew

11339 posts in 3218 days


#1 posted 11-16-2015 03:13 PM

Happy B-Day to your Dad! My Mom was 90 on Saturday.

Celtic Knots are easier to clamp if you don’t cut completely thru the blank at the 45° angle. Leave 1/16 to 1/32” holding the blank together. That way the pieces don’t slip as you clamp the insert in place. When the turning takes place, the “un-cut” part gets turned away.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View DocSavage45's profile (online now)

DocSavage45

7703 posts in 2306 days


#2 posted 11-16-2015 04:38 PM

Mark,

You turn a good tail! Play on words? LOL! I tried out some blades on my cabinet saw that worked well on my old craftsman table saw, and they sang a not so sweet I’m out of balance song. Damn and they are relatively new.

Keep telling myself it doesn’t pay to buy cheap, but there I go again. ( Not laughing at this one.)

Looks like you have found another mystery to uncover in exploring mother natures gifts?

It also looks like you have longevity on your side. Hope he had a great birthday!

As it gets colder here in MN I will be posting my summer with Murphy, you asked for a blog on my wood/lawn tractor shed. It’s being built like your turning experiences, with what I have sitting for someday to use.

Looking forward to the next installment of your journey.

Keep makin sawdust!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Bob Collins's profile

Bob Collins

2318 posts in 3147 days


#3 posted 11-16-2015 08:46 PM

Jeeeez Mark you play with wood I and many others would ignore. Look forward to seeing the out come of this adventure. I agree with Lew above and have used that method off not cutting all the way through. Keep at it and enjoy.

-- Bob C, Australia. I love sharing as long as it is not my tools

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

1752 posts in 526 days


#4 posted 11-17-2015 06:03 AM

Yeah. I got the theory straight.
To quote Me: ”. (A note about the kerfs in these Things: You can leave quite a bit of lumber at the bottom of the kerf – when you turn the rectangle into a cylinder, you’re going to go right through the floor of the kerf. Different words: A rectangle [square-in-profile] loses a lot of meat on its way to becoming a circle – the floor of the kerf is only left in order to make the glue-up easier by keeping the two halves of the blank aligned.) ”
Bob, on Thursday, or thereabouts, I was looking around for a bit of Pine in log form. RBS says to me, “Ron’s bringing something for you when he gets here Saturday.” Weird, huh? I didn’t have any Pine in log form, and wound up with a stick from Oregon, a thousand miles away, two days later. I couldn’t not use it.

-- Mark

View lightweightladylefty's profile

lightweightladylefty

3138 posts in 3176 days


#5 posted 11-17-2015 06:22 AM

Mark,

This must be a busy time of year for birthdays! My dad turned 98 on Friday, and still keeps busy mowing the grass, plowing the snow, walking a mile a day, etc., etc. I think he might be in better shape than I am!

I’ve always wanted to turn one of the Celtic knots. Thanks for sharing your escapades!

L/W

-- Jesus is the ONLY reason for ANY season.

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

1752 posts in 526 days


#6 posted 11-17-2015 09:11 AM

I’ve been working so hard on the videos I’ve been posting today in my Blog herein (Monday), that this Thing is still on the lathe, trying to decide what it’s gonna turn into. RBS and Company are leaving tomorrow (Tuesday, which is what today is, now – 0105). I’m done with the videos for now. Mebees, I’ll do some more work on this Thing before I shut down. Try to have something they can take with them. It’s okay if I don’t get it done – they don’t know I’m doing it for them.
And, WOW, ninety-eight years is a long time to spend on one planet. We haven’t met before. Thanks for stopping by. For this reason, I do Buddy Thee.

-- Mark

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

1752 posts in 526 days


#7 posted 11-20-2015 07:54 AM



Jeeeez Mark you play with wood I and many others would ignore. Look forward to seeing the out come of this adventure. I agree with Lew above and have used that method off not cutting all the way through. Keep at it and enjoy.

- Bob Collins

The next installment is on its way, shortly. In a few minutes, in point of fact. The “outcome” comes tomorrow.

-- Mark

View lew's profile

lew

11339 posts in 3218 days


#8 posted 11-21-2015 04:52 PM



Yeah. I got the theory straight.
To quote Me: ”. (A note about the kerfs in these Things: You can leave quite a bit of lumber at the bottom of the kerf – when you turn the rectangle into a cylinder, you’re going to go right through the floor of the kerf. Different words: A rectangle [square-in-profile] loses a lot of meat on its way to becoming a circle – the floor of the kerf is only left in order to make the glue-up easier by keeping the two halves of the blank aligned.) ”
Bob, on Thursday, or thereabouts, I was looking around for a bit of Pine in log form. RBS says to me, “Ron s bringing something for you when he gets here Saturday.” Weird, huh? I didn t have any Pine in log form, and wound up with a stick from Oregon, a thousand miles away, two days later. I couldn t not use it.

- Mark Wilson

Sorry about that- Guess I should learn to read instead of just looking a the pictures!

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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