LumberJocks

Blue Ice #2 "Not A Turning"

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Blog entry by Mark Wilson posted 10-15-2015 01:36 AM 1091 reads 0 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I present this as a blog because, as the series title would indicate, I’m not sure I’m done with it.
The subject, a chunk of Mulberry, found its way to my hand today. I thought, Where will I put a hole in it to mount it on the lathe?

What’ll I be, said he.

Mebees a candle Holder?

Mebees, Woodsmith. But, aren’t I a bit thin for that?

Good point.

I am an awful pretty piece of timber though, no? I like me the way I am.

Mebees just a little shine and a little color?

Okay. But don’t make me look like a clown. I like what you did to Jacaranda last week.

Some planing and sanding made history of the chainsaw stink.

Some more rubbing with SP and MM. And some BLO.

Some 400 WD makes it smooth again.

Then, Woodsmith gets all uppity and tries something different. I have some Envirotex on the way – I’ll get it Friday – and I want to know what’ll happen if I pour on WOP like I will the resin. As a kind of practice before the practice. Well, it doesn’t flow like it, and it doesn’t shine like it. But, I like it. And Mulberry didn’t say he didn’t like it.

It needed some serious rubbing. So, on to the 320 and 400 WD (W).

Some Pummice.

Rubadubdub.

A brisk massage with a rag. (I know I left out all the coloring detail – it’s an Acrylic Wash, using thinned-out Titanium White, Phthalo Blue, and Blue Lake.)

Rottenstone is next. Watch what happens.

Rubbadubdub.

A brisk massage with a rag.

I know, huh?

Now, about those shavings and all that sunlight.

It could be wetter-looking, and Things like this will get wetter and wetter, with time and experience.

Thus spake Mulberry.

Enjoy.

-- Mark



13 comments so far

View doubleDD's profile (online now)

doubleDD

5238 posts in 1509 days


#1 posted 10-15-2015 03:53 AM

Whatever you have there, the coloring is awesome. It will be interesting to see where you go from here.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View fatman51's profile

fatman51

335 posts in 1302 days


#2 posted 10-15-2015 06:29 AM

Love what you are doing with the chunk of mulberry. Amazing finish. I am glad you are posting your blue ice stuff. The finish would look awesome on a jewelry box.

-- The Constitution only gives people the right to pursue happiness. You have to catch it yourself. Benjamin Franklin

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fatman51

335 posts in 1302 days


#3 posted 10-15-2015 06:48 AM

You know? That almost looks like turquoise

-- The Constitution only gives people the right to pursue happiness. You have to catch it yourself. Benjamin Franklin

View Mikesawdust's profile

Mikesawdust

274 posts in 2505 days


#4 posted 10-15-2015 07:23 AM

I’m in northern Italy and they have a lot of Mulberry, from when they used to produce silk. Now they are protected and I can’t cut them down, but I’ve wondered what I would find. I look forward to the day I can get to wood that looks that amazing.

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

1756 posts in 529 days


#5 posted 10-15-2015 08:10 AM

John, I have all this Mulberry and Jacaranda lying around, along with other locally cut trees, waiting for me to do something with it. Big slabs of the Mulberry and many sticks of the Jacaranda. And no big-boy bandsaw with which to cut it up. And no friends with such a saw. And no money to pay someone who has one to cut it. And, I’m a sorry excuse with a chainsaw. Excuses, excuses, excuses. Leave me be. I’m trying to work this out. (Since you’re likely unfamiliar, John, that’s me and my Echo hashing things out. I tend to subject my readers to these little confrontations. Bear with me.) So, get out the bucksaw and the planes and break a sweat, Woodsmith. (My Echo always talks loud cause he thinks I’m not listening.) On a side-note: It looks like Turquoise to me, too, a little. Imagine how it’s gonna look when I get good at it. Where was I? Oh. Yeah. That’s what’s need. I need to get up off my lazy tukus and do what I need to, to get some of this wonderful timber into a box-making way. The Jacaranda’s easier. I can pull an already bucked piece of that off the shelf and mount it up. And, it’s getting prettier as time goes by, it really is. Your opinions mean a great deal to me, John.
Mike, you’re new to me. I shall Buddy Thee. Where in Italia are you? Are you a native, or an expat, or a guy sent there by your boss? Italy is a country I dream of visiting. Particularly the parts of Italy the tours don’t generally go. I’m that way about most of Europe. Hey. You’re my first Buddy in Italy. Congratulations. You win the prize. Have you ever been to San Marino? How about Montebello” I want to visit that little enclave simply because it bears the same name as the sacred Land Of My Birth. (Montebello, California.) About the Mulberry: Yes, it’s a stunningly beautiful wood. I got mine when my neighbor, two doors down, a Croatian expat, had his tree removed from his front yard. I’d been lusting after that wood for years. He’d been cussing out-loud at it for years because of its high maintenance costs. Now, I don’t know how Italy, or your locality treat of trees on private property. But here, they’re fair game. You might look into it. I also don’t know anything about who cuts and trims trees there. But, if they’re private contractors, you could look them up, and assuming the privately-owned trees are fair game, ask all the local tree trimmers to, pretty please, let you know when they’re going to be cutting one and relieve them of the burden of carting off the detritus. Someone’s trimming them – they get really out of hand (ask my neighbor). Also, I’m certain that you’re free to pick up any branch that’s knocked of by the wind or a careless truck driver. Note that the branches have an entirely different, almost White Oak character than the trunk material, which has amazing heart/sapwood burly qualities. It’s all lovely.
I just spent a little time in your Gallery, and, I gotta say, I’m glad to know you. And, I now know what EOD stands for.

-- Mark

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Tooch

1351 posts in 1341 days


#6 posted 10-15-2015 09:03 AM

The grain looks sick, and the faint blue coloring adds an amazing mystique to it. Now, can you make that into a floating shelf without sacrificing the live edge on the bottom? that would be a possibility for this lovely piece.

-- "Well, the world needs ditch-diggers too..." - Judge Smails

View fatman51's profile

fatman51

335 posts in 1302 days


#7 posted 10-15-2015 11:42 AM

Mark, I will post a blog the next time I am planking a log in my yard. Fortunately I know people with saw mills, there are three in my little area and a guy with a wood mizer, so I do not always do it myself. When I do, I grab a wife, neighbor, or passer by and ask them to hold a pencil wile I sight down the log and decide where I want them to mark it on each end. I chalk a line and nail a 2x to the line with big nails. This 2x guides my co-op special 20 inch Poulan as I make my rip. I use a skip tooth or even a safety chain, filed to rip, which you can learn do do from youtube. Once I have flat sides of two halves or a flat side of one, I turn that down on my duddage so my work piece is stable. I can then decide if I want to quarter saw or just slab it out for wider planks. Sometimes the logs are too big to be easy, I once cut an enormous(by CO standards) big leaf maple that I had to whittle apart by making plunge and horizontal cuts to remove one timber at a time. The most difficult tree I ever processed was a Chinese elm. I ended up giving a lot of that to turners who who were willing to work harder for it than I was. Lately, I have been gathering pine (lodgepole and ponderosa), douglas fir and spruce from a browned and burned out hill top(9600 feet) that get less moisture than the hills around it. The timber has tight rings and is some of the nicest densest softwood that I have seen on new material of that kind. It will make great furniture, doors, siding, trim, whatever I need it for. on another note, I sure wish that sycamore were common here.

-- The Constitution only gives people the right to pursue happiness. You have to catch it yourself. Benjamin Franklin

View lew's profile

lew

11342 posts in 3221 days


#8 posted 10-15-2015 12:45 PM

You lost me with SP, MM and WD

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

1756 posts in 529 days


#9 posted 10-15-2015 08:42 PM



The grain looks sick, and the faint blue coloring adds an amazing mystique to it. Now, can you make that into a floating shelf without sacrificing the live edge on the bottom? that would be a possibility for this lovely piece.

- Tooch

It’s only 9-1/2” X 2-1/2”. So its a little impractical for a shelf, Tooch. It’s a great idea for bigger things like this. Like this, being, the leftover slab from milling a log. Thanks.

John, thanks. 1) What is “duddage”? B) I don’t have any logs that are suitable for planking (no tree trunks/large, lower branches). All my wood is whacky or slabs. In any case, smaller than you’re accustomed to.
I long for trunks and whatnot, and an Alaskan mill. As it is, when I have a small “log” (3-4” and <12>ll probably do it again. Check your messages in a bit. I have more to say to you.
Lew: Sand Paper; Micromesh; Wet/Dry

-- Mark

View John's profile

John

465 posts in 735 days


#10 posted 10-16-2015 12:35 AM

Mark, no Mulberry up my way, beautiful wood. I read up on it a bit, guys are saying it turns brown over time, is there any way to stop that? Your piece is looking like blue marble, very nice.

-- John, Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada.

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

1756 posts in 529 days


#11 posted 10-16-2015 08:15 AM

Thanks, John (not Fatman). I’m only a few months into this species, so I have no POV on the way it’ll behave over time yet. The heartwood is very brown to begin with. What the sapwood will do, I do not know. Blue Ice #2 is, of course, sapwood. Check the movement in that stuff, though. I certainly hope it doesn’t get obscured by darkening. I don’t expect it to. It is encased in plenty of Acrylic Paint and WOP. Let us wait and see, shall we?

-- Mark

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7483 posts in 1472 days


#12 posted 10-16-2015 08:09 PM

Looks pretty cool now. Will be interesting to see how it ages.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

1756 posts in 529 days


#13 posted 10-17-2015 12:07 AM

Thanks, Joe. I smell a new blog.

-- Mark

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