LumberJocks

Multi-Axis Turning #2: I Tried Again

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Blog entry by Mark Wilson posted 10-06-2018 08:38 AM 342 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Try #2 Becomes someThing Else Part 2 of Multi-Axis Turning series no next part

I tried it again. I thought I was doing much better this time. In point of fact, an important thing I learned from yesterday was that the wood I’m using is pretty fragile at the points where the spur- and live-center make contact, being all angular and whatnot – the centers are placing pressure through the cylindrical piece like an earthquake fault shearing across its opposing face. Knowing this going in, I took measures to prevent the two faces of the fault from slipping entirely past one another. That is, after I rounded the blank and cut the depth tenons, and after I located the three points for the off-axis mounting, I soaked the areas around those points with thin CA glue (the real, expensive stuff I got at Rockler, not the Loctite or Gorilla Super Glue I’ve always been using). With great confidence and aplomb did I go into this. And, I got the first face of the twist to my liking, reasonably smooth, shaped the way I wanted it on the 1-2 centers, then moved it to the 2-3 centers. It broke again.
I think that, next time I try this, I’m gonna have to use a harder wood than the Jacaranda. I actually looked at what Rockler had when I was there yesterday afternoon to buy the CA. I didn’t see anything that struck my fancy. I have lots of Maple logs lying around, and Eucalyptus, too. Oh. And that gorgeous Mulberry, as well. Those are very hard, very tight-grained woods.
I think, for now, I’ll step away from the whole “twisted cup” scheme and bust into some of those hard woods and get to know them better.
As for the piece of Jacaranda that’s still on the lathe, after re-mounting it between the main-axis centers and goofing around with it with a few different tools, there’s no one on Earth saying that it can’t still be a Thing. The jury’s still out, and we’re still young, aren’t we?

-- Mark



7 comments so far

View lew's profile (online now)

lew

12319 posts in 3897 days


#1 posted 10-06-2018 01:50 PM

I wonder if something like this would help reduce the breakage-

I really like mine.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

2253 posts in 1205 days


#2 posted 10-06-2018 05:43 PM

Lew, I went looking for one with all those many points. What I got was a small one with four points. Lead me, sir, to that prize.

-- Mark

View lew's profile (online now)

lew

12319 posts in 3897 days


#3 posted 10-06-2018 10:08 PM

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

2253 posts in 1205 days


#4 posted 10-07-2018 07:05 AM

Thanks, Lew. Nut, riddle me this:
When I decided that I could live without the Sorby name, and only pay $20 instead of $70, and I clicked on the “Buy it now” button, the page just stared at me. Tried it repeatedly. Tried it in a new tab. Blank stare.
Neveryoumind. I just ordered it from Penn State.

-- Mark

View bushmaster's profile

bushmaster

3232 posts in 2425 days


#5 posted 10-07-2018 02:38 PM

I have found that these dont grip that well, to many points to drive into hard wood. That one I made for my home made lathe does not slip. four concrete nails, tap it in the wood and then drill four holes. Made with a nut and metal welded on then center and spur holes drilled for the nails

-- Brian - Hazelton, British Columbia

View lew's profile (online now)

lew

12319 posts in 3897 days


#6 posted 10-07-2018 08:30 PM



Thanks, Lew. Nut, riddle me this:
When I decided that I could live without the Sorby name, and only pay $20 instead of $70, and I clicked on the “Buy it now” button, the page just stared at me. Tried it repeatedly. Tried it in a new tab. Blank stare.
Neveryoumind. I just ordered it from Penn State.

- Mark Wilson

I think that’s where I got mine. I know I wouldn’t pay anywhere near $70 for one of these.


I have found that these dont grip that well, to many points to drive into hard wood. That one I made for my home made lathe does not slip. four concrete nails, tap it in the wood and then drill four holes. Made with a nut and metal welded on then center and spur holes drilled for the nails

- bushmaster

That is part of the idea. If a catch occurs, the teeth slip instead of tearing out the wood.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

24379 posts in 3993 days


#7 posted 10-08-2018 12:47 AM

Yes, I have one of those centres like Lew’s. i use it a lot but I have doubts about the stress it would suffer on multi access turning. I think you need a large chuck mate.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

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