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Router Table Idea's #1: What to do?

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Blog entry by MBAJIM posted 11-22-2017 11:08 PM 476 reads 0 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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Hi everyone,
I have a router table that we’ve attached an old Bosch 1615EVS Plunge Router to, and here’s my problem; I need something that will raise and lower the router bit WITHOUT me having to get under the router, release the lock, and then crank the up / down spindle. I’ve searched for this for a few months and can’t find anything that would allow me an easier way to raise and lower the bit.

Thanks everyone,

Jim

-- Talking out of turn? That's a paddlin'. Lookin' out the window? That's a paddlin'. Staring at my sandals? That's a paddlin'. Paddlin' the school canoe? Oh, you better believe that's a paddlin'.



13 comments so far

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

552 posts in 442 days


#1 posted 11-22-2017 11:59 PM

You may be trying to avoid the expense but there is really no substitute for a commercially made router plate/lift. Not only are they extremely handy but the accuracy that you can achieve is second to none. Sometimes you can get lucky on Craigslist. $175 is about the lowest price for new then there is the DIY ones on you tube.

The plunge base isn’t really the handiest for mounting under a table even though it intuitively seems so. The fixed base is better. They do make these for the Bosch 1617 & 18 series but not sure if they fit the 1615.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

View Rich's profile

Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


#2 posted 11-23-2017 12:49 AM

Generally, that sort of setup has the router mounted to a drop-in plate that you can lift out and set on the surface.

For a solid table, about the only thing I know of that you can do to make an under-mount plunge router easier to use is to hinge the table top in the back so that it can be lifted and propped allowing you to access the adjustments and collet from in front of it.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View MBAJIM's profile

MBAJIM

21 posts in 290 days


#3 posted 11-23-2017 01:01 AM

The thing is I only paid $25 for the router, and its 3 1/4 hp. It is mounted to a drop in plate that screwed to the table with 4-screws. Honestly I’ve never thought about just pulling the plate and adjusting the router before, that might be the way to go, it would be easier than getting under the stupid thing to do all the adjustments.

-- Talking out of turn? That's a paddlin'. Lookin' out the window? That's a paddlin'. Staring at my sandals? That's a paddlin'. Paddlin' the school canoe? Oh, you better believe that's a paddlin'.

View Rich's profile

Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


#4 posted 11-23-2017 01:09 AM


It is mounted to a drop in plate that screwed to the table with 4-screws.

- MBAJIM

Yeah, you can leave the screws off since the weight of the router will hold it in place and then just grab inside the opening and lift it out. You’ll be able to change bits and do your adjustments standing up.

Edit: For safety, either unplug the router or put it on a switched power strip so you don’t risk bumping the switch on the router and turning it on when you are maneuvering it.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View MBAJIM's profile

MBAJIM

21 posts in 290 days


#5 posted 11-23-2017 01:12 AM

@Rich,

I don’t know why, but that has never entered my mind before… Thanks man, I think I’m just going to do that, not have the expense of trying to buy a router lift.

-- Talking out of turn? That's a paddlin'. Lookin' out the window? That's a paddlin'. Staring at my sandals? That's a paddlin'. Paddlin' the school canoe? Oh, you better believe that's a paddlin'.

View Rich's profile

Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


#6 posted 11-23-2017 01:30 AM

Glad to help. You might still get some more ideas on here. There are some really creative folks on this site.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View MBAJIM's profile

MBAJIM

21 posts in 290 days


#7 posted 11-23-2017 01:42 AM

I was thinking about trying to make some sort of platform that raised and lowered via a crank… but, I don’t think like that, and don’t know what I would need to make something like that work.

-- Talking out of turn? That's a paddlin'. Lookin' out the window? That's a paddlin'. Staring at my sandals? That's a paddlin'. Paddlin' the school canoe? Oh, you better believe that's a paddlin'.

View PlanBWoodworks's profile

PlanBWoodworks

87 posts in 320 days


#8 posted 11-23-2017 01:56 AM

When I built my router table, I didn’t want to buy a lift, either. This was my solution.

-- Hardwoods shouldn't be so expensive. Unlike money, hardwoods literally grow on trees!!!

View MBAJIM's profile

MBAJIM

21 posts in 290 days


#9 posted 11-23-2017 01:58 AM

@PlanBWoodworks,

That’s a really good idea…

-- Talking out of turn? That's a paddlin'. Lookin' out the window? That's a paddlin'. Staring at my sandals? That's a paddlin'. Paddlin' the school canoe? Oh, you better believe that's a paddlin'.

View PlanBWoodworks's profile

PlanBWoodworks

87 posts in 320 days


#10 posted 11-23-2017 02:59 AM

Thanks. The top is made from laminated mdf. I put a couple of hinges on the back of the cabinet and another hinge on the piece that holds the lid up. My router table build is described in more detail in my projects. I can tell you that I have been using this table since June and am very happy with it. Feel free to let me know if you need any further information.

-- Hardwoods shouldn't be so expensive. Unlike money, hardwoods literally grow on trees!!!

View eflanders's profile

eflanders

219 posts in 1689 days


#11 posted 11-23-2017 03:06 PM

Is your plug base spring loaded? If so, I’ve seen on another website where a guy put an old scissors jack directly under the router to adjust the height. I think he strapped the handles to the jack.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

1702 posts in 1061 days


#12 posted 11-23-2017 03:27 PM

Many (most?) routers these days have access holes from the base (your table top) that allow a crank to raise/lower the depth from above.
For pure ease of use you can’t beat a commercial router lift, but the prices can be steep compared to shop built alternatives.

If you do go commercial, I’d recommend a “sidewinder” (woodpeckers) type crank that sits on the side of the table. Makes it a lot easier to adjust when your table top has the lift hole covered with the fence or a jig.

View KevinOsborn's profile

KevinOsborn

1 post in 21 days


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