LumberJocks

methods of work #33: Through tenons for a dining chair

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Loren posted 06-16-2014 07:41 PM 1077 reads 1 time favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 32: "Composing" a bent wood dining chair Part 33 of methods of work series Part 34: 2 curvy dining chair prototypes »

Chair dry assembled. Through tenons (instead of blind tenons) are kind of a hassle but they are the right choice for this chair for structural reasons. On the legs they are not needed but I figured why not go all and do them anyway. The seat is from another chair prototype and I think not the right shape for this chair. I’ll make another one tapered in at the back and see how that works.

-- http://lawoodworking.com



5 comments so far

View Kaleb the Swede's profile

Kaleb the Swede

1248 posts in 692 days


#1 posted 06-17-2014 10:46 AM

Those through tenons are nice Loren. How did you cut them out? And, how did you not damage them when you put them in? I like the gentle curve on the back of the chair also.

Looking good so far

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

View Loren's profile

Loren

7809 posts in 2371 days


#2 posted 06-17-2014 03:30 PM

The mortises are trickier to cut than the tenons. I
used a hollow chisel mortiser. I am still figuring
that machine out. You have to flip the work
and cut from both sides. The tenons I just cut
overlong so that’s why they are sticking out. I’ll
cut them off flush after I glue.

I cut the tenons on the table saw for the ones on
the legs and in the back, the band saw for the
ones piercing the front rail. In this case I cut
them as “speed tenons” on the table saw.

I put wedges in the tenons when I glue up. I think
I want to ebonize this chair to hide some flaws in
the material and I’m considering how to have the
little wedges not ebonized. I think what I’m gonna
do is use temporary wedges and glue it up with the
tenons wedged out, remove the wedges, cut
the tenons off, sand and stain, then put new little
pale wedges in for contrast.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

15138 posts in 1061 days


#3 posted 06-17-2014 03:43 PM

Mortises are something that I need to spend a lot more time learning. Yours are looking great.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View Loren's profile

Loren

7809 posts in 2371 days


#4 posted 06-17-2014 03:55 PM

I taper the mortises so they open out at the wedge end. I
use an iwasaki file. The wedging action compresses the wood
enough at the ends that when cut off the tenon tends
to have a pretty clean look. Try a few for practice and
you’ll see. It looks cool.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Kaleb the Swede's profile

Kaleb the Swede

1248 posts in 692 days


#5 posted 06-17-2014 06:12 PM

I see now. Very cool . I may have to try through mortises at some point now. And thanks

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase