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methods of work #29: Fitted tool tray made with the overarm router

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Blog entry by Loren posted 12-30-2013 10:39 PM 1366 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 28: Armchair armrest design Part 29 of methods of work series Part 30: Steam bending a wide board »

There’s not much I’ve seen written about how to operate an
overarm router, so I try to make an excuse now and then
to learn more about use of the machine from doing
non-critical projects on it.

My layout tools had been rattling about in a drawer. I went
though them and decided that these 5 are ones I use
most and could fit together in a little tray I could put in
the tool well at the back of my bench. I also have this
theory that having a nice little fitted tray back there will
encourage me not to use the tool well as a bin for
odds and ends as often happens.

I cut the template out of hardboard on a scroll saw and
refined it with files. With a pin router the template goes
under the work and the router bit plunges in from the
top. Each cut-out in the finished tray is a different depth.

-- http://lawoodworking.com



8 comments so far

View theoldfart's profile (online now)

theoldfart

4307 posts in 1117 days


#1 posted 12-30-2013 10:50 PM

Loren, what does an overarm router look like? I don’t think I’ve ever seen one.

-- "Aged flatus, I heard that some one has already blown out your mortise." THE Surgeon ……………………………………. Kevin

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

539 posts in 379 days


#2 posted 12-30-2013 10:55 PM

Year i am a bit lost here as well. Would love to see the machine in action!

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View Loren's profile

Loren

7623 posts in 2314 days


#3 posted 12-30-2013 10:57 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yBHgl35czps

The machine is called an overhead router, pin router or overarm router.

Before CNC machines they were a production workhorse
in factories for cutting out templated parts.

You can make your own version of an “inverted pin router”
buy mounting an arm on a router table. However the
pneumatic or foot-pedal plunging action of an
industrial pin router makes for faster work.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View theoldfart's profile (online now)

theoldfart

4307 posts in 1117 days


#4 posted 12-30-2013 11:05 PM

Thanks, so the material moves?

-- "Aged flatus, I heard that some one has already blown out your mortise." THE Surgeon ……………………………………. Kevin

View Loren's profile

Loren

7623 posts in 2314 days


#5 posted 12-30-2013 11:12 PM

Yes. The pin is often used just like a bearing on the end
of a flush trim router bit. The difference is the cuts can
be done in steps so thicker material can be cut out in
multiple passes. And of course the bit can plunge and
make flat-bottom mortises like I did here.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

539 posts in 379 days


#6 posted 12-30-2013 11:30 PM

Ahh. Much clearer now. Neat machine! I could see a machne likt that be realy effficient for repeated cuts. Perhaps most for rounded stuff…

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View rhett's profile

rhett

699 posts in 2333 days


#7 posted 12-31-2013 12:39 AM

All my planes are made on an overarm.

Here is a pic of my Delta RU-50, next to one I built from 80/20. It weighs about 600lbs more than the little aluminum guy. Had to replace all the pneumatics but thats to be expected on older machines.

Much can be done with an overarm router, given an attentive and inventive operator.

They were replaced by CNC’s as Loren said, though you would be hard pressed to find a CNC with a spindle or motor as robust.

-- It's only wood.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

4977 posts in 1243 days


#8 posted 12-31-2013 02:56 PM

http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=43038&cat=1,43000

One can be had through Lee Valley at an equitable price of 169.00 plus shipping etc.

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