LumberJocks

A perl script for sizing Sawmill Creek style cutting boards

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Blog entry by Llarian posted 1675 days ago 1671 reads 4 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I’m lazy and like to use computers to do things for me, so I threw this together quickly. =)

I wanted to make some Sawmill Creek style cutting boards, sized to fit in a medium flat rate box, and didn’t feel like doing the math. (Cutting board tutorial here: http://www.sawmillcreek.org/articles/2/)

The length doesn’t matter, but you need to take into account kerf size and such when figuring how much wood you need to make these, and I made it calculate the blade offset for each cut as well.

So here’s what you get when you run it:

The first run is the help file:

llarian@cerberus ~ $ ./cb
Usage: ./cb <width> [<kerf>]
Calculate cut offsets and total wood needed for a Sawmill Creek style cutting board.
See: http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?t=2692

WIDTH: Total width (in inches)

KERF: (Optional) Size of kerf in 32s, default 3/32” (thin kerf)

The second is a 10” cutting board, using the default kerf size (3/32”, or a thin kerf blade):

llarian@cerberus ~ $ ./cb 10
1: Slat: 1/32”, Offset: 1/8”, Total: 1/32”, Used: 1/8”, Doubled: 1/16”
2: Slat: 1/16”, Offset: 5/32”, Total: 3/32”, Used: 9/32”, Doubled: 3/16”
3: Slat: 3/32”, Offset: 3/16”, Total: 3/16”, Used: 15/32”, Doubled: 3/8”
4: Slat: 1/8”, Offset: 7/32”, Total: 5/16”, Used: 11/16”, Doubled: 5/8”
5: Slat: 5/32”, Offset: 1/4”, Total: 15/32”, Used: 15/16”, Doubled: 15/16”
6: Slat: 3/16”, Offset: 9/32”, Total: 21/32”, Used: 1 7/32”, Doubled: 1 5/16”
7: Slat: 7/32”, Offset: 5/16”, Total: 7/8”, Used: 1 17/32”, Doubled: 1 3/4”
8: Slat: 1/4”, Offset: 11/32”, Total: 1 1/8”, Used: 1 7/8”, Doubled: 2 1/4”
9: Slat: 9/32”, Offset: 3/8”, Total: 1 13/32”, Used: 2 1/4”, Doubled: 2 13/16”
10: Slat: 5/16”, Offset: 13/32”, Total: 1 23/32”, Used: 2 21/32”, Doubled: 3 7/16”
11: Slat: 11/32”, Offset: 7/16”, Total: 2 1/16”, Used: 3 3/32”, Doubled: 4 1/8”
12: Slat: 3/8”, Offset: 15/32”, Total: 2 7/16”, Used: 3 9/16”, Doubled: 4 7/8”
13: Slat: 13/32”, Offset: 1/2”, Total: 2 27/32”, Used: 4 1/16”, Doubled: 5 11/16”
14: Slat: 7/16”, Offset: 17/32”, Total: 3 9/32”, Used: 4 19/32”, Doubled: 6 9/16”
15: Slat: 15/32”, Offset: 9/16”, Total: 3 3/4”, Used: 5 5/32”, Doubled: 7 1/2”
16: Slat: 1/2”, Offset: 19/32”, Total: 4 1/4”, Used: 5 3/4”, Doubled: 8 1/2”
17: Slat: 17/32”, Offset: 5/8”, Total: 4 25/32”, Used: 6 3/8”, Doubled: 9 9/16”

And last, a 4/32” or full kerf blade (still a 10” board):

llarian@cerberus ~ $ ./cb 10 4
1: Slat: 1/32”, Offset: 5/32”, Total: 1/32”, Used: 5/32”, Doubled: 1/16”
2: Slat: 1/16”, Offset: 3/16”, Total: 3/32”, Used: 11/32”, Doubled: 3/16”
3: Slat: 3/32”, Offset: 7/32”, Total: 3/16”, Used: 9/16”, Doubled: 3/8”
4: Slat: 1/8”, Offset: 1/4”, Total: 5/16”, Used: 13/16”, Doubled: 5/8”
5: Slat: 5/32”, Offset: 9/32”, Total: 15/32”, Used: 1 3/32”, Doubled: 15/16”
6: Slat: 3/16”, Offset: 5/16”, Total: 21/32”, Used: 1 13/32”, Doubled: 1 5/16”
7: Slat: 7/32”, Offset: 11/32”, Total: 7/8”, Used: 1 3/4”, Doubled: 1 3/4”
8: Slat: 1/4”, Offset: 3/8”, Total: 1 1/8”, Used: 2 1/8”, Doubled: 2 1/4”
9: Slat: 9/32”, Offset: 13/32”, Total: 1 13/32”, Used: 2 17/32”, Doubled: 2 13/16”
10: Slat: 5/16”, Offset: 7/16”, Total: 1 23/32”, Used: 2 31/32”, Doubled: 3 7/16”
11: Slat: 11/32”, Offset: 15/32”, Total: 2 1/16”, Used: 3 7/16”, Doubled: 4 1/8”
12: Slat: 3/8”, Offset: 1/2”, Total: 2 7/16”, Used: 3 15/16”, Doubled: 4 7/8”
13: Slat: 13/32”, Offset: 17/32”, Total: 2 27/32”, Used: 4 15/32”, Doubled: 5 11/16”
14: Slat: 7/16”, Offset: 9/16”, Total: 3 9/32”, Used: 5 1/32”, Doubled: 6 9/16”
15: Slat: 15/32”, Offset: 19/32”, Total: 3 3/4”, Used: 5 5/8”, Doubled: 7 1/2”
16: Slat: 1/2”, Offset: 5/8”, Total: 4 1/4”, Used: 6 1/4”, Doubled: 8 1/2”
17: Slat: 17/32”, Offset: 21/32”, Total: 4 25/32”, Used: 6 29/32”, Doubled: 9 9/16”

The left number is the number of the cut.
The Slat size is the width of the offcut that you actually use.
The Offset is how much you need to move the fence to the left for this cut.
The Total is the total width of the slats you’ve cut (of that wood type) so far.
The Used is the total used (of that wood type) so far, including kerf.
The Doubled value is the combined total of the two wood types.

So, I wanted around a 10” wide board in the thin kerf example above, so my last cut gives me a 17/32” slat, and the total width of the board will be 9 9/16”. About perfect for a medium flat rate box. =)

And here’s the script: (Uses the Math::Fraction module from CPAN)

http://www.llarian.net/~llarian/cb

(I tried to put the code in here, but the LJ posting editor really doesn’t play well with perl. heh)

-- Dylan Vanderhoof - General hobbiest and reluctant penmaker. http://llarian.etsy.com



5 comments so far

View Bret's profile

Bret

162 posts in 2081 days


#1 posted 1675 days ago

I hadn’t ever seen a cutting board like that—thanks for doing this!

Though I’d have used Python, myself. ;-)

-- Woodworking is easy as 3.14159265358979323846264338327950288419716939937510...

View Llarian's profile

Llarian

128 posts in 2194 days


#2 posted 1675 days ago

haha. Perl is where I’m most comfortable, but I like Python too. =)

What I really should do is web enable the script and toss it on my server somewhere so anybody can use it without having perl installed. Maybe after work.

-- Dylan Vanderhoof - General hobbiest and reluctant penmaker. http://llarian.etsy.com

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12239 posts in 2684 days


#3 posted 1675 days ago

Perl is a great language…..

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Jimi_C's profile

Jimi_C

506 posts in 1822 days


#4 posted 1675 days ago

I’m a python man. I’d rather use Java than Perl… :D

-- The difference between being defeated and admitting defeat is what makes all the difference in the world - Upton Sinclair, "The Jungle"

View Dan Lyke's profile

Dan Lyke

1464 posts in 2712 days


#5 posted 1674 days ago

I’ve been frustrated with a couple of CAD systems recently, and have started thinking that it might be worthwhile to do certain sorts of layouts (I’m specifically thinking about the walls and such for my upcoming workshop building) with Perl. I may have to try to modularize the notion of studs and siding and sheathing and see if I can do this by code rather than drawing.

Thanks for the impetus. And the pointer to Math::Fraction.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke

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