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Lathe Disc Sander table with T-track

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Blog entry by LittleBlackDuck posted 09-24-2016 06:13 AM 602 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Boy and Girls, This blog is to supplement a project I penned earlier, regarding Lathe disk sander with micro adjustment. Please click on the link to read about the micro adjustment feature of the brains behind the underlying mechanism. Just a quick memory twister….

This table was designed using Sketchup and here is a link to it for anyone interested. Again I have not provided measurement as everything depends on the person undertaking the build and their respective timber and hardware availability. Just as a rough comparison, the table is 300mm x 350mm and the track is 400mm long (too lazy to shorten it and aluminium swarf is a bugger to clean up). If you want to use my measurements, simply download Sketchup Make (freebie) and use the tape measure. Here is a link to a quick start I wrote for anyone not familiar with SU (be warned… there are many more out there much better).

I have cut a lot of parts using a lazer (because I can and it’s an easy transition from SU to the lazer table), however, most are straight cuts and can easily be performed using standard cutting tools and a router. In either case these pictures are just to get anyone interested, started.

The 19mm x 19mm “runner” is designed to provide an anchor for the 2 way vise’s jaws and greater meat for the t-track’s screws.

The jig needed a front support to brace the work against the rotation of the disc. I curved it to minimise contact as I sneaked the whole contraption up to the sander and it also served as a zero clearance to stop “burring”. It will eventually wear back and need replacing. Made out of the same thickness (6mm MDF) as the “sled”.

The supports were made out of 2 pieces of 3mm MDF, for no other reason than to automatically provide a slot for the t-bolt’s head. 6mm dowels were used to align the strategically lazer cut holes for glue up alignment.

The movable “sled” was designed to mount a 5/16” dia. bored wheel at one end and a 1/4” dia. at the other, locked in by a t-bolt.

The “sled” is braced by 2×5/16” dowel at each end, that was the same width as the t-track opening.

Spare supports were made to cater for differing requirements. The curved support had to be cut right back to facilitate small circles like wheel’s rims (min 34mm dia.) or use a strip of narrow MDF clamped to the table as required.

The jig in use giving a small shave to a MDF stunt double of a construction vehicles’ wheel.

Thank for taking the time to get this far.

-- There's two ways to do things... My way or the right way.. LBD



5 comments so far

View htl's profile (online now)

htl

2181 posts in 621 days


#1 posted 09-24-2016 01:31 PM

Super nice project, it’s so pretty!!!
All it needs now is a way to feed in the wheel and then be able to stop it at the right depth, micro adjustable stop block.
You may have it but just not seeing it in this post. I forgot your using your adjustable vise under the table for this but if some one sees this post and doesn’t read much [who do we know like that] they’ll miss the best part of it.
Need pictures of the underneath in this post.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View Pjonesy's profile

Pjonesy

110 posts in 288 days


#2 posted 09-24-2016 09:00 PM

I like the whole concept, it has got to make the set up for different size wheels a snack. However I do worry that sometimes we spend more time on making jigs etc, than we do on the actual models.

-- Peter New Zealand

View htl's profile (online now)

htl

2181 posts in 621 days


#3 posted 09-24-2016 10:32 PM



I like the whole concept, it has got to make the set up for different size wheels a snack. However I do worry that sometimes we spend more time on making jigs etc, than we do on the actual models.

- Pjonesy

LOL Anyone with more than 3 or four models doesn’t need to worry about jigs cause they may just may be addicted to modeling, me thinks.
So an extra jig or 5 won’t even be seen amungst all them toys. LOL

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

588 posts in 282 days


#4 posted 09-24-2016 11:51 PM


Need pictures of the underneath in this post.

- htl


Thx #4, Right again.. as always. Have added a pickie.

I like the whole concept, it has got to make the set up for different size wheels a snack. However I do worry that sometimes we spend more time on making jigs etc, than we do on the actual models.

- Pjonesy

LOL Anyone with more than 3 or four models doesn t need to worry about jigs cause they may just may be addicted to modeling, me thinks.
So an extra jig or 5 won t even be seen amungst all them toys. LOL

- htl


PJ, you are right and #4 hit the nail on the head.
However, I will add that the underlying thought was to provide a generic micro adjustable “sanding mechanism” and I used the “wheel mounting” sled as an example.

No offence meant, but as we all make similar models, it’s our jigs and method of operation that makes us all unique and I have to admit, I like making jigs. Needless to say, I often throw jigs away as years later I can never remember what it was designed for (or how it was used :-(...).

-- There's two ways to do things... My way or the right way.. LBD

View htl's profile (online now)

htl

2181 posts in 621 days


#5 posted 09-25-2016 12:33 AM

Much more better!

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

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