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Wheel Tread routing jig for T and J toys.

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Blog entry by LittleBlackDuck posted 02-26-2016 03:39 PM 1042 reads 1 time favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This simple routing jig to be used on 4” diameter x 1 1/2” piece of wood to rout treads using a 8mm guide bush. The jig was designed in Sketchup. The top plate (pattern) can be changed as required as long as the “channel” is 8mm wide and is positioned on the jig using 4 locating dowels. The jig is small approximately 200mm x 140mm x 130mm and is designed to be used with a trimmer. There is a side viewing window to line up indexing marks as you spin the wheel around and a hole to either use a 19mm dowel (or your thumb/finger) to stabilise the wheel. Alternatively you can use a wedge between the base plate and the wheel.

SKP file can be made available on request.

-- There's two ways to do things... My way or the right way.. LBD



6 comments so far

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2022 posts in 1636 days


#1 posted 02-26-2016 03:59 PM

Interesting jig Alex! Thanks for sharing.

With this jig you have to accept that the grove depth over the full tire width will change. The depth differences will be bigger with wider treads or in diameter smaller wheels.

-- My englisch is bad but how is your dutch?

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

613 posts in 288 days


#2 posted 02-26-2016 10:28 PM

My original design was for 5” x 3/4” wheels with the result no different than if you did it on the tablesaw (as per the T & J suggestion in their plans). I have customised this model to accommodate your wide tyres and the fact that your wavy tread goes across the tyre which should minimise. I have posted it just to introduce the jig without complications. I have used a similar concept with arced walls and the guide bush following template made out of 3mm MDF which was bent around an arc using 1.5mm deep kerfs (though not as tight an arc as we are using for the wheels and I did customise a baseplate for the trimmer to the shape of the arc on a spindle sander). At times we put more effort into jigs than their use to create the end product.

-- There's two ways to do things... My way or the right way.. LBD

View crowie's profile

crowie

1499 posts in 1418 days


#3 posted 06-03-2016 10:34 AM

G’Day Ducky,
I’m in the middle of making 16 lug tyres for 4 monster trucks and have cut 32 circular blacks with a 93mm T/C Holesaw in the drill press; 16 outers with a 1.5” forstner recess in one side.
The 18 cuts in each blank are to be done on my table saw with a jig at 15deg; 16 on the right & 16 on the left ensuring I do equal numbers of inners & outers each side.
The next step is to glue the 2 halves together and when the glue is set use another jig to chauffeur the edges on the disc sander…..
I’m surely interested in seeing how you jig works as using the dado blades on the tablesaw looks a little harsh.
The 4 monster trucks are to be used as fund raisers for the local community club were our family volunteers.
Thank you in advanced…

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

613 posts in 288 days


#4 posted 06-03-2016 11:37 AM

eiworc yaD’G, back to you.
As always I started writing another epic and after reading your description the second time I got somewhat confused and put the brakes on as you posted it against this jig but you were taking about routing and sanding seperately. I am hoping you don’t have some poor bugger in a suit in your workshop when you mentioned chauffeur and meant chamfer. If you did mean chauffeur, in the words of Pauline “Please explain”.

Now if you mean chamfer, I already have the sanding jig SU model already on the DropBox site. If you mean a routing template see below. While I use my laser to cut the pieces, other than the gears, all other parts are easily accommodated by standard workshop equipment. Again (again only if you had read the bit I typed before and left below this) if you want an A4 PDF layout I can see what I can do.

LBD.

This is what I started and decided to leave in after actually answering what you really asked).
I basically designed the jig, hacked it together and gave it to a friend so unfortunately I cannot give you a demo. The jig was actually designed for something else and I customised the “template following top” in the posted picture to demonstrate to Dutchy how the jig may be used for simple treads. The initial requirement was for a pattern marking process on cylinders… I didn’t know about toy wheels back then.

The jig is designed to accept a MDF pattern that slots over the top positioning dowels with any pattern (or combination of overlays) basically for repeatability. I can upload load it up into dropbox and send you the link. Not aware of your SU expertise level, however, if you want a layout diagram of the 4 pieces (2 sides with basically the same shape except 1 has a slot to view indexing lines), the bottom which is static and glued in place and the top which is designed to be modified as required and slotted over the dowels. There is an optional top stiffener that can be glued into place if your router/trimmer has the reach I probably could arrange a PDF format and should print on A4 paper. Might take a day or so to do though.

-- There's two ways to do things... My way or the right way.. LBD

View crowie's profile

crowie

1499 posts in 1418 days


#5 posted 06-03-2016 11:52 AM

Sorry for the confusion Ducky with wrong works and talking about tablesaws & drillpress….

What I was trying/attempting to do is describe the process I’m currently using to make lug wheels….

I was hoping to gain some insight as to whether your router jig could do the process easier as the current system is slow, labourious and at times very frustrating….

I hope that makes my question a little clearer than mud….thanks you..

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

613 posts in 288 days


#6 posted 06-03-2016 02:00 PM

Crowie, Love a good mud bath.
For straight lines I don’t see any benefit of my routing jig, in fact it might be much slower. If I read you right you are cutting a straight cross kerf into a soon to be wheel. For that operation alone I have found that the appropriate saw blade or router bit with a decent backing board (I use 6mm MDF and move it sideways when the runout kerf get ragged) works the best. I use the traditional T&J documented tread making setup and haven’t found a better way for standard kerf. However, in all fairness a similar question to the wheel making monarcs htl and Dutchy would probably be of more assistance and in fewer words.

Failing that keep asking questions and I’ll try answer briefly.

-- There's two ways to do things... My way or the right way.. LBD

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