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Can a cartoon about woodworking be considered woodworking?

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Blog entry by Liggy posted 03-29-2013 04:20 AM 3703 reads 0 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I’m just wondering if a cartoon or cartoons about woodworking can be considered a form of woodworking? Does a person have to make three dimensional objects in wood to be considered a woodworker ? If this is the main criterion, then what about someone who specializes in marquetry? Is not a pencil a wooden tool? Is not paper a wood product? Can a cartoonist about golfing, for instance, be a lousy golfer, but still be considered a golfer? Is it not perhaps even beneficial for that cartoonist to be a lousy golfer in order to express his unique self as a golfer? What if a person is mentally or physically challenged as a woodworker, and is only able to do woodworking in his own mind? Is success as a woodworker what makes one a woodworker? Or is it about the journey, the enthusiasm, the planning, the piecing together of of woodworking concepts and ideas, and even the mistakes made along the way? I feel some kind of weird pressure to be a successful woodworker before having the gall to share my cartoons with people. But really I think I already am a successful woodworker just based on my cartoons about woodworking. They all take a knowledge of the tools and techniques of woodworking. They often make unique statements about the life of woodworking, its characters and players. It requires a lot of discipline and planning and experimentation to hone in on a given woodworking topic and fit different situations with different characters and props and over arching themes or current trends or foolishly held sacred cows. I am also a little confused about this requirement to post at least 5 postings before I can send a message to someone on lumberjocks. I have shared a link to you of my over 100 postings of my woodworking cartoons , can’t you consider that in lieu of your 5 posting requirement? I’d really like to start sending messages to some fellow woodworkers. Can you please help me ? I’m very new to blogging or navigating websites like this? Plus I’m very shy, many cartoonists are very shy. Embrace the shy.

-- Liggy, at woodlaughs.com



15 comments so far

View redryder's profile

redryder

2235 posts in 1856 days


#1 posted 03-29-2013 05:49 AM

woodlaughs.com

funny.....starving artist I’ll bet…........................

-- mike...............

View camps764's profile

camps764

827 posts in 1114 days


#2 posted 03-29-2013 12:06 PM

Welcome. 5 Posts doesn’t take much…go find some projects that spark your interest and comment on them…problem solved!

To answer your post – in my honest opinion that would make someone an artist or cartoonist – but not a woodworker.

Being a woodworker isn’t just a state of mind – sure, that’s part of it – but being a woodworker is about creating physical, tangible objects out of wood. The skill level of the projects created doesn’t dictate one’s ‘woodworking’ status – a simple birdhouse or box is still a woodworking project after all.

Similarly, I don’t think just because someone takes pictures of woodworking topics they are automatically a woodworker. That makes them a photographer.

All that being said, I think what makes a woodworker, or an artist, or a cartoonist, or a (insert title here) is subjective and personal – so what defines a woodworker to me might not be the same as the next. To some a woodworker might have to work exclusively in wood – to others a woodworker might be someone who does it completely using hand tools – or power tools – or using traditional joinery only.

Just my $.02 Thanks for a thought provoking post first thing in the morning! Look forward to seeing others weigh in on the topic.

-- Steve

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

3703 posts in 761 days


#3 posted 03-29-2013 12:28 PM

”I’m just wondering if a cartoon or cartoons about woodworking can be considered a form of woodworking?”
.
I’ll bet DKV or Dan’um would say it does :-)

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View clieb91's profile

clieb91

3317 posts in 2689 days


#4 posted 03-29-2013 01:19 PM

Liggy, I am not sure I can say that cartoons about woodworking are woodworking. See them more as a different type of artistry. I just browsed through a number of your strips and they are quite good. Have you considered possibly during wood burning and maybe burning a few into wood panels?
As to the posting, I would agree with Steve above just post a few comments to other woodworkers letting them know you like or even don’t like their work. It is just a way that the site is using to manage spammers, and since this is one place that I get very little spam from it seems to work pretty well.

Look forward to seeing more.

CtL

-- Chris L. "Don't Dream it, Be it."- PortablePastimes.com (Purveyors of Portable Fun and Fidgets)

View StumpyNubs's profile

StumpyNubs

6272 posts in 1554 days


#5 posted 03-29-2013 01:29 PM

I would think that to be a woodworker you would have to “work” with “wood”. Being a cartoonist who deals with woodworking subjects doesn’t make a woodworker any more than a political editorial cartoonist is a politician.

With that said, if you have an interest in woodworking, build something. Then you WILL be a woodworker. Being a woodworker isn’t about tools or skills or anything like that. Anyone who regularly builds anything out of wood is a woodworker.

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

16043 posts in 1621 days


#6 posted 03-29-2013 01:33 PM

Let’s ask a similar question. If someone loves the sport of boxing and knows and writes about the sport does that make him a boxer. Some people might ask the guy to get into the ring with a good boxer and prove that you are a boxer. Who could blame them for asking? By the same token there is nothing wrong with what they do. To each his own.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View StumpyNubs's profile

StumpyNubs

6272 posts in 1554 days


#7 posted 03-29-2013 01:38 PM

Where do you share your cartoons now? (Besides your website) What do you hope to achieve with them?

I think your cartoons are great! Do you get much exposure?

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

3703 posts in 761 days


#8 posted 03-29-2013 01:57 PM

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Liggy's profile

Liggy

35 posts in 932 days


#9 posted 03-29-2013 02:20 PM

Thank you everybody for your thoughtful posts. Great analogies and honest feedback. I’m sorry if I sound a little whiney, I’ve just been rejected by dozens of publishers and am trying to just let it go and move onto another big drawing project and just continue to pursue woodworking as it always has been , a hobby I love. Thank you stumpynubs(ha ha) for your questions and compliment, As far as where I’ve shared my cartoons, we’ve done basically no advertising. We no little about marketing. The publishing world is hard to get the attention of, I did have atleast one editor at a very fine woodworking magazine say he/or she liked a few of my cartoons, but needed to sway some kind of a jury. I guess I don’t fare well with juries (ha ha) So now I just really want to put my cartoons out there,because at the core of all this is just an honest desire to entertain my woodworking community. And hopefully in a non-insulting or too snarky of a way. I love the boxing analogy too, I used to box with my pals down on the block as young kid. Please be patient with me as a woodworker, I used to own a bunch of awesome machines (they appear in my cartoons) but had to sell them out of necessity. Because I study Disney and others I just see this as a challenge or limitation that might bear gifts in the end. I am forced to act like a young woodworker who can’t just go out and buy all his machines at once. I am forced to think about just using hand tools. An imagineering book I liked said that limitations are often a good thing for a creative project to have. Well I gotta run now, but thanks everybody even if some of you take a gentlemanly opposing stance, I still appreciate your input. :)

-- Liggy, at woodlaughs.com

View StumpyNubs's profile

StumpyNubs

6272 posts in 1554 days


#10 posted 03-29-2013 02:29 PM

I’ll send you a PM later today. Maybe I can help you.

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

View Dez's profile

Dez

1125 posts in 2831 days


#11 posted 03-29-2013 06:19 PM

Interesting question that I don’t have a definitive answer for.
If you are a woodworker you’ll get the jokes and if you aren’t you probably won’t.
Therefore I’ll be brave and say that you probably have to be a woodworker to be able to create woodworking cartoons.
I know you have successfully created projects out of wood so I would say that you are a woodworker first and a woodworking cartoonist second because of that knowledge. I’ve seen some of your non woodworking cartoons so I have no doubt about that skill. I think a niche like that requires specific insight before you could be very successful.
See, I told you I didn’t have a definitive answer! :D

-- Folly ever comes cloaked in opportunity!

View Liggy's profile

Liggy

35 posts in 932 days


#12 posted 03-30-2013 03:02 AM

Joe in tennessee I saw that cartoon somewhere and thought it was hilarious, but I didn’t see the caption below, and it is even funnier now, Thanks for sharing that with me. I love cartoons. Stumpynubs, I like your videos they look helpful. Go ahead and PM me anytime! oh and thanks red ryder, unfortunately most artists are starving artists, I am fortunate not to actually be starving, and if I would ever be in that situation I’d just visit the friends I volunteer with at a homeless shelter and ask if I could work for my meals until I got on my feet. Here is a quote I think about a lot since this site garnishes itself in a lot of interesting quotes,I’ll share it, “the more I study painting, the less I know”——Degas

-- Liggy, at woodlaughs.com

View StumpyNubs's profile

StumpyNubs

6272 posts in 1554 days


#13 posted 03-30-2013 11:27 AM

I sent you a PM already. You must not have gotten the notification email. Click on the little emvelope icon next to the “pulse” button at the top of this screen.

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

View Liggy's profile

Liggy

35 posts in 932 days


#14 posted 03-30-2013 10:07 PM

Ok i’m reading my comments above called “Can a cartoon about woodworking be considered woodworking?’’ And I would like to first say that I did take the suggestion to make at least 5 posts about projects and woodworking people on this site have done. I want them to know my comments were sincere. They all grab me for one reason or another. I also look forward to seeing and appreciating many more as I come across more time.
I also should say that I have successfully produced two kitchens entirely from scratch using a powermatic 10’’ tablessaw, Powermatic Drill Press, *”Powermatic Jointer, Delta 13”Planer, Ulmia workbench, sunhill mortising machine, black and decker biscuit joiner, and dewalt plunge router. I made my own crosscut table saw jig, from an article in fine woodworking. I attempted to make a Frank Klausz inspired bench, but got stymied pretty much by the complicated top and wound up selling the base which I did succeed in making to the guy who eventually bought my aforementioned biscuit joiner and delta 14”bandsaw I failed to also mention. Give me a little time and i will post photos of both kitchens and my machines. My machines appear in most of my cartoons because I am very intimately aware of how they are put together and taken all apart. Don’t ask me why. Ok , I’m a push over. The reason was space issues.( Probably the space between my ears more than anything else) I think it was Carol Burnett Who said” Comedy is tragedy plus time.” Well enough time is going by that I’m starting to be able to laugh at the loss of my machines. I do still have a nice set of Lee and Nielsen handplanes and expect too give them a workout very soon. I own a low angle jack plane, a low angle smoothing plane, a low angle block plane, a shoulder plane and a scrub plane. I also own an Ulmia Jointer plane and smoothing plane. And I still have my Dewalt Plunge router. I still have a good vise I bought at woodcraft store, and am thinking of making a tail vise out of it using a 3”x3” square length of aluminum I own for some reason. I have a bunch of Family obligations all next month so I probably won’t be able to finish that project until may or april. Plus I might just give in and buy an inset tail vise from LeeValley for 90 or so dollars. Or I might take Ian Kirby’s advice I read somewhere that, a tail vise might not even be needed at all. Just a stop needed for handplaning. I may practice that a few months before giving in on a new vise.

-- Liggy, at woodlaughs.com

View Liggy's profile

Liggy

35 posts in 932 days


#15 posted 03-31-2013 12:20 AM

oh I should mention that piece of aluminum is a hollow tube with 1/8” thick walls. Looking at it , I can visualize it becoming a tail vise with a little bit of router work done to it to allow a normal bench dog to penetrate both the top and bottom of the tube. I will use 3X3” by three or four inch blocks of maple or oak to epoxy in the tube, I will probably just let the acme threads ride on a hole through the end most block and have the other block attach to the swivel nut. Since I intend to make small things for awhile it should serve me well as a way to clamp 3 or 4 ” wide boards 1/4 to 1/2” thick. of course only one of the blocks will be epoxied because the other must ride or slide in the tube. Am i making sense? Probably not. lol

-- Liggy, at woodlaughs.com

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